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By M. DION THOMPSON | December 2, 1990
Voices in the Mirror: an Autobiography.Gordon Parks.Doubleday.351 pages. $22.95. The story begins on the Kansas prairie with a newborn baby, apparently dead, being wrapped for disposal. But an assisting doctor intervenes, places the silent child in a tub of cold water and swishes him about. The baby boy screams to life. Such was the beginning of Gordon Parks' life.What a life it has been. He has become a true Renaissance man: photojournalist, film director, composer, author of 12 books of poetry, fiction and non-fiction.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Joe Boylan was sitting with Jimmy Patsos at last Saturday's Loyola-Duke lacrosse game when the former athletic director asked the man he had hired as the school's basketball coach eight years ago if he had any preference as to where Greyhounds would play their first NCAA tournament game in 18 years. "Jimmy wanted to go to Pittsburgh because our fans could get there - and then he said, 'I've set it up for the team to go to the Andy Warhol Museum,'" Boylan recalled Monday. "How many coaches whose teams are going to the NCAA tournament are thinking about that?
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1994
Hyman Solomon Rubinstein -- a man of broad and stunning talents as a neurologist, violinist, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, humanitarian, writer and the inventor of his own shorthand -- died of heart failure March 17 at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 90."During the 1940s, he took in Jewish refugees from Germany, Russia and Argentina and they remained lifelong friends," said Roberta Faith Rubinstein, a daughter who lives in Pikesville. "He visited orphanages and was always giving away money to those who were in need."
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
About two weeks after his 2010 season ended, Jim Johnson walked into a classroom at the State College of Florida-Bradenton campus, settled his 6-foot-5, 230-pound frame behind a table, and put his right arm through an entirely different test. For about two hours, Johnson, wearing a T-shirt, shorts and flip flops, took an exam to complete a written communications course. First, he answered questions, then he penned a short essay. The presence of a major league pitcher in the room couldn't have mattered less.
NEWS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
If anything, Nathan Kealey is an anti-cliche.Take his conflicting off-the-field image. At first glance his braces and short hair appear to reveal your basic boyish-looking 17-year-old senior.That impression is jarred by the medium-sized ring hanging on his left ear and his slight ponytail.Kealey's topics of conversation range from his football exploits at Mount Hebron to points far away.He remembers the details surrounding his stunning 55-yard field goal last month, for instance. But he also enjoys talking about the two-week trip he took alone to Europe as a sophomore.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 14, 1994
Gary Vikan, the newly appointed director of the Walters Art Gallery, could reasonably be called a modern-day Renaissance man.He's a serious scholar, a person who tackles whatever he does with dedication and skill, whether that be creating catalogs on Byzantine art or writing a paper on Elvis Presley's Graceland. He's a man who on first meeting seems reticent, but is warm and even endearing to those who know him well.He possesses a wry sense of humor, plays a fair game of golf and can cook up a storm.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
Edwin Thaddeus Morris could explain the peculiarities of building dams and bridges throughout the continent of Africa. He could hunt his food and transform it into a four-star dinner. Want to know anything about the Congo River? Consult the maps Mr. Morris corrected.Mr. Morris, a resident of Ruxton, did not limit his interests. They were varied and took him all over the globe. From the time he was a young man until well after his retirement, he had great success in almost everything he tried.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunte and Stephen Hunte,Sun Film Critic | June 3, 1994
Da Vinci. Now there's a renaissance man. But . . . DeVito?In fact, it is significant of the confusion that attends "Renaissance Man" that it turns out not to be about either the renaissance or men or even the concept of the Renaissance Man, a polymath like Da Vinci equally adept at a great number of disciplines."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | November 23, 1992
Freshman state Del. John Morgan thinks of himself as a citizen politician for whom government is more of a calling than a career."I think we were better off when the legislature was filled with farmers," the Howard County representative says.In some ways, Mr. Morgan is a throwback to that time. But in others, he seems light years ahead of it.At the age of 28, he has a doctorate in materials science and engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. He is also the second youngest delegate in Maryland, behind 23-year-old Kenneth D. Schisler, a Talbot Republican.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 28, 2008
Paul Newman the actor, director, race car driver, political activist and philanthropist has died - and a buoyant strain of the American spirit has gone with him. He was 83 when he succumbed to cancer at his home near Westport, Conn., on Friday. For all his adult years, he imbued each of his arenas with unique, muscular vivacity. Mr. Newman wore the mantle of his superstardom lightly. Honored as an actor and a humanitarian, respected for putting forth liberal views without condescending to opponents, he was a Renaissance man and a stand-up guy. With Robert Redford in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting , Mr. Newman became part of our national pop fantasy life.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 1, 2011
Edward Charles "Ned" Wilson III, a retired Aberdeen Proving Ground information technology specialist and former board member of Maryland Life Magazine, died June 17 of prostate cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 64. The son of farmers, Mr. Wilson was born in Baltimore and raised on the family farm in Darlington, where he eventually built a home and spent his entire life. After graduating from McDonogh School in 1964, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1968 in English from Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa. Drafted into the Army in 1968, Mr. Wilson was sent to Phu Bai, Vietnam, after completing training in preventive medicine at Fort Sam Houston in Texas.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Mark Gray Falkenhan was a "firefighter's firefighter," a man driven to battle flames and train others to do so. When the Baltimore County volunteer ran into a burning apartment building Wednesday in the Hillendale area, he was doing what he always did, using his instincts and his training, looking for cues about the risks he was taking. "Up until those last few moments, Mark did the right thing," said Division Chief Michael W. Robinson, his former boss at the Baltimore County Fire-Rescue Academy, who had known Falkenhan for a quarter-century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Painter. Scientist. Inventor. Designer. Engineer. Visionary. Genius. Has there ever been a man with more labels attached to his name than Leonardo da Vinci? Probably not. In a world where mere mortals struggle to master just one profession, da Vinci seemed to master them all. He painted "The Mona Lisa" more than 500 years ago, and it's still probably the most famous painting in the world. He was a key developer of the camera obscura, an early projection device whose descendants include the still camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 25, 2009
He writes verse, and one of his poems won an international poetry competition. He paints, and one of his works was displayed on the Web site of a major British newspaper. He blogs for another major British newspaper. He composes music that gets performed in high-profile places. He's the author of a book on prayer. Oh yes, and Stephen Hough also plays the piano. Brilliantly, incisively, compellingly. The British keyboard artist and 21st-century Renaissance man, a recipient of a $500,000 MacArthur Fellowship (the so-called "genius grant")
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
Wilde Lake coach Doug DuVall introduces the Wildecats' kicker Graham Spicer this way: "Here is our Renaissance man," he said, describing him as a student with wide interests who is an expert in several of them. "He is a neat kid," said DuVall. "He got 800 on his math SAT. He couldn't do any better than that." Spicer, a 6-foot, 185-pound senior, has a 3.57 grade point average and has come through in the clutch this season. His other interests include music and playing Ultimate Frisbee.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 28, 2008
Paul Newman the actor, director, race car driver, political activist and philanthropist has died - and a buoyant strain of the American spirit has gone with him. He was 83 when he succumbed to cancer at his home near Westport, Conn., on Friday. For all his adult years, he imbued each of his arenas with unique, muscular vivacity. Mr. Newman wore the mantle of his superstardom lightly. Honored as an actor and a humanitarian, respected for putting forth liberal views without condescending to opponents, he was a Renaissance man and a stand-up guy. With Robert Redford in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting , Mr. Newman became part of our national pop fantasy life.
FEATURES
By Story and photos by Dale M. Brown and Story and photos by Dale M. Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 1997
We reached out and touched Thomas Jefferson ... at least my wife and I felt we did when we entered his world on a recent driving tour of Virginia's Jefferson country. We discovered that the state where this extraordinary American was born, raised and passed his last years is so rich in structures and landscapes associated with him that he is a presence here still. Seeing his world in three dimensions made him seem even more real to us than did the commendable Ken Burns' television treatment of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 2, 2003
A searcher after unfathomable things, a painter of disquieting smiles that suggest the riddles of human personality, and of hands that point to mysteries beyond the earth, he seemed to his contemporaries a sort of magician, and to men in later centuries an Italian Faust."
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | September 1, 2006
Ron Giddings, 25, describes himself as a jack of all trades and a glutton for punishment. This season, he has dedicated considerable time and talent to directing two Annapolis Summer Garden shows: the midseason offering Urinetown and the Broadway Under the Stars 40th Anniversary show opening Sept. 8. The event will raise funds for the restoration and renovation of Summer Garden's building and performance space. "I have had a blast shaping them and pulling new things from all these experienced performers," Giddings said of the cast, embracing the "choreographed chaos that makes a smooth and tight show for the audience and absolute madness for the actors.
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