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Renaissance

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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
It never fails. You try to point out that some supposed rule has no validity or make some empirical observation about actual English usage, and immediately comes the God-is-dead-and-everything-is-permitted outcry. It happened today in a Facebook comment on my post "English has no scruples" :  " does this mean that i'm longer entitled to cringe when i hear, 'where did you go to school at?' or 'i wish i would have gone?'"  Nothing that I said about the language being what its users collectively make it obliterates the social and cultural dimensions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 5, 2014
I've been reading "A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction" by Christopher Alexander. This is a mighty must-have-doorstopper for anyone interested in New Urbanism and the vocabulary of spaces that a person would actually want to live in. It was published in 1977, so architects, designers and city planners have had almost 40 years to soak in the intelligence of constructing buildings and developing public spaces that feel humane....
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 3, 2010
I 've long given up predicting where and how Baltimore will reinvent itself. So, one day this week, on a walk down Guilford Avenue, I spotted the construction a few blocks east. I also drew a deep breath. A new structure was rising at Greenmount Avenue and Oliver Street facing the Gothic Revival entrance to Green Mount Cemetery. On a perfect spring day, with the old burial ground's walls enclosing hundreds of flowering and budding trees, it seemed perfectly natural for some new housing to be rising here.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The Maryland Zoo opened its first new major exhibit in a decade on Saturday, pinning its hopes on the endangered African penguin to spark a renaissance for the beleaguered institution. The new, $11 million Penguin Coast is now one of the first things visitors see after taking a shuttle to the park's exhibits. A small island designed to mimic a makeshift South African fishing camp sits in the center of a ring of water, so the penguins can swim in circles past an enclosed underwater viewing area.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
I find it amusing that The Sun fails to see the inconsistency of positions on the rebirth of Baltimore City ("Baltimore and rebirth," July 5). Until the city can achieve property tax parity with the surrounding jurisdictions, stop increasing taxes and fees, reduce crime and improve the school system there is no way it will ever see its population grow. Nothing about Baltimore City - or the state of Maryland - encourages the development of new businesses and jobs. To answer The Sun's own question - "Are we doing everything that can be done to attract and retain business?"
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield | March 1, 1991
There was a time not long past when music lovers -- even knowledgeable ones -- pretty much figured that great music began with Bach and Handel.Early music from the medieval and Renaissance periods was the exclusive province of musicologists and a few dedicated ensembles that performed and recorded in relative obscurity.But as anyone who cruises the CD bins knows, those days are over.Early music has become big box-office as many conductors and their groups have been navigating through this once-forgotten territory, turning up many remarkable pieces and composers in the process.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
What's the best way to "jump- start" Baltimore's renaissance?How about running an east-west branch of the state's light rail line through Lexington Market? Or allowing cars back on the downtown stretch of Howard Street where they're now banned? Or transforming the Lower Jones Falls into a park with jogging trails and biking paths?Those are a few of the suggestions outlined in "The Renaissance Continues," a provocative report that was presented to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke earlier this month.Prepared by the Baltimore chapter of the American Institute of Architects, the 62-page document consists almost entirely of citizens' ideas for making physical improvements throughout downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
September 15, 1992
The Maryland Renaissance Festival in Crownsville is open weekends between 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. through Oct. 18.Special events are planned, such as the Scottish Celebration, Sept. 19 and 20, featuring Highland Games, pipe bands, music and dance; Senior Citizen's Day Sept. 26, when people 62 and older are admitted free; and Deaf Awareness Day on Oct. 3, with stage shows interpreted for the hearing impaired. The Columbus and the New World Celebration is scheduled for Oct. 10 and 11, followed on Oct. 17 by the High School Madrigal Competition.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 1999
They were the first self-made millionaires in modern history: a group of Italian merchant princes whose quest for human self-sufficiency would become the defining energy of their age.The Renaissance, as their era would be called to reflect their interest in the rebirth of classical antiquity, would trigger perhaps the most breathtaking explosion of art the world has known.In burgeoning urban centers like Florence, they prayed, plotted, ran municipal affairs and held court in a style grand enough to inspire envy among the kings and popes who were their contemporaries.
NEWS
By David J. Ramsay | February 17, 1999
THE UNIVERSITY of Maryland, Baltimore, has occupied the same site since 1807 as the founding campus of the University of Maryland.With new buildings and programs, the university has played a pivotal role in the rebirth of the west side of downtown. But problems crying out for urban renewal lie between the eastern borders of our campus and downtown.Our neighborhood's complete rebirth is not possible without more redevelopment. And that will only occur with investment in projects that serve as catalysts, such as the Hippodrome Theater.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
As the Maryland Renaissance Festival prepares to open for its 2014 season on Saturday in Crownsville, hearings are looming on the festival's proposal for a future move to Lothian. The festival is seeking zoning approval to move to a farm in Lothian. Anne Arundel County's administrative hearing officer denied the festival the zoning approvals it needed. The festival appealed to the county's Board of Appeals, which has scheduled six nights of hearings for the case. The first hearing will be held from 5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2014
James Gummer is no ordinary drummer. Not only does he perform in an all- percussion show called the Drum Runners, he also will be playing for the jousts and the chess game at this year's Maryland Renaissance Festival, opening Saturday and running through Oct. 19 in Crownsville. "I like working for the Renaissance Festival because there are so many great performers there," said Gummer, 41. "And I feel like I've grown a lot from being around them. " Gummer, a resident of Perry Hall, has been participating in the festival for 17 years and has no intention of stopping any time soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Around the dawn of the 6th century, the philosopher Boethius noted that "music is part of us, and either ennobles or degrades our behavior. " It's still hard to argue with him. In the centuries after Boethius, artists illuminated music's benefits and potential pitfalls in remarkable ways, producing the sorts of works that form an intimate new exhibit at the Walters Art Museum. "Seeing Music in Medieval Manuscripts," which will be on display into mid-October, was curated by Chiara Valle, the Zanvyl Krieger Fellow in the Department of Manuscripts and Rare Books at the museum.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
The Maryland Renaissance Festival organizers have appealed a zoning decision that prevents the festival from moving to a new site in southern Anne Arundel County. Earlier this month, the county's administrative hearing officer denied requests from the festival for a special exception and variances to allow the festival to operate on a Lothian farm that lacks required "major road" access. The case now moves to the county's seven-member Board of Appeals. A hearing has not yet been scheduled.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
One by one, they came to the microphone and made their case: The Maryland Renaissance Festival is fun, but it doesn't belong in a rural community. The festival annually attracts to Crownsville about 300,000 visitors who gobble smoked turkey legs, guzzle mead and are enchanted by jousters, musicians and artisans in a replica of an English village under the reign of King Henry VIII. Organizers say the festival has become a victim of its own success and needs more room to accommodate traffic, revelers and vendors than the 130-acre site can provide.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
The Maryland Renaissance Festival is seeking a zoning approval to move to a new property in southern Anne Arundel County. The festival and property owner Michael Booth will appear before a county hearing officer on Thursday to make the case for a variance to allow the festival to be located on Upper Pindell Road in Lothian, which is designated as a scenic and historic road and lacks required direct main road access. They also are seeking a special zoning exception, which is required for renaissance festivals, and are also seeking . They also want approval to run the festival for 23 days each fall, up from the current 19 days.
BUSINESS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | January 23, 1991
Declaring that the viability of Maryland is linked to the stabilit of the city, the Greater Baltimore Committee, in a report being released today, is calling for a massive infusion of state and regional aid to fuel a "second renaissance" in Baltimore.The new aid would include $150 million to put the city's much maligned school system on equal financial footing with suburban school systems.The GBC, the city's leading business group, also is recommending changes in the way the state distributes income tax revenues so that jurisdictions like Baltimore with declining tax bases do not lose more revenue.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
In his first hour in Maryland yesterday, Burton Hummell caught a glimpse of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, heard a sales pitch about the state's mass transit system and toured the National Aquarium.Then he ate his lunch -- a Maryland crab cake.It was a hectic start for Mr. Hummell and 79 fellow members of the Nashville Chamber of Commerce, who arrived yesterday for a three-day tour of Baltimore. They are checking out the city's renaissance to see if it offers any lessons to apply toward the redevelopment of Tennessee's second-largest city.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Organizers of the Maryland Renaissance Festival have said for years they might eventually move from the event's current home in Crownsville, but that possibility has grown since the festival's president said this month he has another property under consideration. Jules Smith, president of the company that runs the popular festival, wouldn't share details but has said the site is on a major highway with more fields and woods than the current location. Smith said he's been considering a move for at least seven years, dating to when his lease on the current site was close to expiring.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 23, 2013
So rednecks need to be politically correct now? Wait, before the National Association of Rednecked Persons attacks me, let me be clear that I don't mean "redneck" as an insult. Indeed, Redneck Pride has been on the rise ever since Jeff Foxworthy got rich informing people they "might be a redneck. " (Some clues: if your school fight song was "Dueling Banjos;" if you've ever raked leaves in your kitchen; if your boat hasn't left your driveway for 15 years; if birds are attracted to your beard, etc.)
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