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TRAVEL
November 19, 2006
WALKS THROUGH MARIE ANTOINETTE'S PARIS Ravenhall Books / $27.95 A life, anyone's life, is bound up in the place or places it is lived. Take, for example, the life of Marie Antoinette. She became famous because she traveled from her native Austria to marry in France. And because court etiquette kept her at Versailles for so much of her life, she eventually created an idyllic getaway resort on its grounds. Author Diana Reed Haig has captured the poignancy of Antoinette's life in what is a fast-paced and compassionate biography.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 27, 2012
We are gathered here today to memorialize a man who revolutionized our lives. So what did Eugene J. Polley do? What was the nature of his great leap forward? Did he invent the PC? Did he invent the cellphone? Did he invent the Internet? No. Eugene J. Polley invented the wireless remote. You young'uns won't remember this, but back in the day, when you wanted to change channels you had to actually get up from the couch and embark upon an arduous trip five, six, sometimes even seven feet across the living room, where you would manually turn a "dial" until the desired channel sprang into view in all its black-and-white glory.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 27, 2012
We are gathered here today to memorialize a man who revolutionized our lives. So what did Eugene J. Polley do? What was the nature of his great leap forward? Did he invent the PC? Did he invent the cellphone? Did he invent the Internet? No. Eugene J. Polley invented the wireless remote. You young'uns won't remember this, but back in the day, when you wanted to change channels you had to actually get up from the couch and embark upon an arduous trip five, six, sometimes even seven feet across the living room, where you would manually turn a "dial" until the desired channel sprang into view in all its black-and-white glory.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | February 8, 2008
Elizabeth Kasameyer has always loved taking photographs, but only recently did she find a satisfying way to share them: She pays $25 a year to use Flickr - Yahoo's photo-sharing Web site. By signing up for the online service, Kasameyer joined a revolution that some call "cloud computing" and others have dubbed the "big switch." With the spread of broadband Internet, Flickr and other Web-based services are becoming increasingly popular. As a result, home and business computing are moving from individual PCs to huge networks owned by companies such as IBM, Google and Yahoo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | March 12, 2001
You spend the night laboring at home on a report that's due at the end of the week. When you arrive at the office the next morning, you sit down at your PC, ready to finish the job, and suddenly you get that sinking feeling. Yup - you're an idiot. You forgot to e-mail yourself a copy of the work you did the night before. So you're downtown and the report is on your hard drive at home. Sound familiar? Maybe you've experienced the reverse - wishing you'd remembered to bring home an important file from your work computer.
FEATURES
By James A. Fussell and James A. Fussell,Kansas City Star | August 18, 1993
Let's try a little experiment.Wives, the next time your husband is camped in front of the boob tube with a death lock on the remote control, snatch it away and ditch it in the dirty clothes.Then stand back and watch the fun begin.That's precisely what Linda Hopkins of Kansas City, a bookkeeper, did to her husband, Jack."I wanted to teach the little stinker a lesson," she says in a na-na-na-na-na voice. "He's always got that controller with him. It's like he'd had it surgically attached to his arm."
SPORTS
By STAN DILLON | April 23, 1995
Ten-year old Patrick Jones of Taneytown comes from a racing family. His parents, Veronica and Scott Chasen, have been weekly competitors at 75-80 Dragway.But that has changed recently. Now, instead of focusing all of their time on drag racing, the family has become involved in Patrick's new hobby, remote control racing.It all started when Scott went to see a friend of his race the remote control cars. It immediately impressed him as something that Patrick would enjoy. Scott and Veronica surprised Patrick at Christmas with the 1/10 scale competition off-course truck.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | January 16, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - I've got good news and bad news from Afghanistan. The good news is that America doesn't need a lot to satisfy its basic security interest here, which is that this distant land never again be so uncontrolled that a tumor like Osama bin Laden can grow in its midst and then metastasize into the world and threaten us. We really don't need much to get that - just a loose Afghan federal government, some basic police and army units, a...
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 4, 2006
I hurried home from work one afternoon this week to be on the scene as a member of our household learned new skills. The student was not one of my kids or my wife. It was a remote control. The remote control for the Yamaha RX V2600 AV Receiver became the smartest one in the room. It absorbed the responsibilities of the remotes that operated the satellite television receiver, the DVR player and the flat-screen television. It would assume its new duties shortly before Sunday's Super Bowl XL. Under the tutelage of Andrew Myer, installation manager of the audiovisual store Soundscape, the receiver remote sat nose-to-nose in turn with each of the other remotes.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 27, 1996
You use it all the time. Odds are, you have more than one, since there now are more of them than there are of us.To most of us, it is simply "the remote" -- as in, "Where's the remote?" That's the thing about it: The only time we give the remote control device any thought is when we're trying to find it. Otherwise, it's just this little plastic box with buttons that we wave in the general direction of whatever it is we want to change.Forty years after its invention, the remote control has changed programming, advertising and even you. It has added firepower to the war between the sexes.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 2, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Citing "credible specific information" about terror tactics, Transportation Security Administration officers nationwide stepped up their scrutiny of passengers carrying remote-control toys aboard airplanes yesterday. The move was not motivated by a specific terror plot, said Kip Hawley, the assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security in charge of aviation security. But there is concern in the United States and internationally that common remote-control toys could be used to detonate a bomb as part of a terror plot.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | June 28, 2007
If you're among the 100 million iPod owners who won't be buying an Apple iPhone when it goes on sale tomorrow, don't worry. There are plenty of gadgets that can satisfy your desire to part with bundles of cash for an improved "i" experience. In fact, for the same $600 that Macolytes are spending on high-end iPhones, you can engage the services of George, an elegant if pricey speaker dock with one of the coolest remote controls I've seen. Yes, that's a $600 accessory for an iPod whose list price tops out at $350.
BUSINESS
By Craig Crossman | April 5, 2007
Are your kids staying up half the night playing online games and chatting with strangers? Are they driving you nuts because they just won't get off the Internet even though you've told them a thousand times to do so? Wouldn't it be great if you could just somehow press a magic button from anywhere in the house and their Internet connections would be instantly severed? It's the ultimate in parental power and control - and available in a new product called Best NetGuard. There are all kinds of monitoring software that will show you where your kids are surfing, when they're going there and what they're doing once they've landed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2006
I'm not so good with buttons, especially those that control video games. When I play, it's a full-body experience with a lot of arm movement as I try to move my little guy on the screen. The physical activity does nothing to influence the game, but it's good exercise and provides plenty of amusement to my brothers, significant others and anyone else watching. Now, though, there's Nintendo Co.'s Wii console with its motion-sensitive controller: Finally, the arm-flailings of novice gamers aren't mocked.
TRAVEL
November 19, 2006
WALKS THROUGH MARIE ANTOINETTE'S PARIS Ravenhall Books / $27.95 A life, anyone's life, is bound up in the place or places it is lived. Take, for example, the life of Marie Antoinette. She became famous because she traveled from her native Austria to marry in France. And because court etiquette kept her at Versailles for so much of her life, she eventually created an idyllic getaway resort on its grounds. Author Diana Reed Haig has captured the poignancy of Antoinette's life in what is a fast-paced and compassionate biography.
FEATURES
By JULIA KELLER and JULIA KELLER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 4, 2006
Rarely does an Adam Sandler movie spark deep critical thinking. But in the new movie Click, Sandler plays a man whose remote control can ride herd over not just his TV, but also over time itself. He can fast-forward, pause, rewind. The remote control seems so ordinary that its extraordinariness is easy to miss. In the half-century since it was first hooked to TVs in American homes, the remote control has become faster, easier, sleeker, more efficient, more sophisticated and applicable to a spiraling number of gadgets: DVD players, ceiling fans, automobiles, draperies, security systems.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 13, 2003
YOU CAN FIX a leaky faucet or a loose towel rack and chances are good that no one in your household will notice. But fix the television's remote control and you will be treated like a hero. I speak from experience. Yesterday, the remote control that governs our family-room TV stopped working. Perhaps it was kaput because the batteries in the unit had died. Perhaps it was not working because someone accidentally hit the wrong sequence of buttons, which also can throw the device into confusion.
FEATURES
By JULIA KELLER and JULIA KELLER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 4, 2006
Rarely does an Adam Sandler movie spark deep critical thinking. But in the new movie Click, Sandler plays a man whose remote control can ride herd over not just his TV, but also over time itself. He can fast-forward, pause, rewind. The remote control seems so ordinary that its extraordinariness is easy to miss. In the half-century since it was first hooked to TVs in American homes, the remote control has become faster, easier, sleeker, more efficient, more sophisticated and applicable to a spiraling number of gadgets: DVD players, ceiling fans, automobiles, draperies, security systems.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIST | June 22, 2006
Now and then I'm seduced by a what-the-heck: a gadget that you don't really need but might be useful - or not. It's so cheap that you say, "Hey, for 20 bucks? What the heck." Then you click the add-to-my-cart button. A friend providently steered me to a great what-the-heck a couple of weeks ago - the RCA Lyra RD900W Wireless Transmitter. The device originally listed for $100, but it shows up on buy.com and other outlets for $20 to $25. The Lyra addresses a simple problem. You have a couple of thousand album tracks stored on your PC. You also have a nice stereo (or even just a boombox)
NEWS
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
My mother is not a control freak. She was perfectly happy with her five-button remote control: She could turn her TV on, move the volume up and down and change channels, one at a time. It did the job. So when I presented her with a new one - with what must have been 118 buttons - she did that silent thing she does, that reaction that consists of really no reaction at all. The new remote control came with her new DVD player, which I'd bought to replace her old VCR. But let's back up. At the beginning of this year, my mother turned 80 and moved from her house into a retirement community.
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