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By Jules Witcover | February 14, 2012
It's not unusual in politics for a party to nominate in haste and repent in leisure. In 2008, many Republicans feared before the election that they had chosen a loser in John McCain, and in 2004 many Democrats felt the same about John Kerry. It's known as buyer's remorse, and in both these cases, the concern was borne out in the outcome. Indeed, the phenomenon goes back at least to 1976, when the Democrats watched peanut farmer Jimmy Carter plod inexorably to their presidential nomination, and then were besieged with doubt about whether they had picked a loser.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Morgan Lane Arnold said she was "glad" her father was dead and wished her boyfriend had also killed her father's girlfriend, a forensic psychiatrist testified in court Wednesday. The Howard County teenager was in a state of active psychosis when she made the comments about her father, Dennis Lane, said the psychiatrist, Neil Blumberg, who testified as an expert witness for the girl's defense. Arnold's lawyers are trying to get her case transferred to the juvenile system. The girl, now 16, is accused of asking her then-boyfriend, Jason Bulmer, to kill Lane.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 29, 2014
In all the reporting of the shootings at The Mall in Columbia, one sentence hit me like a punch in the gut. "His mother right now is struggling for a reason to live," said Ellis Cropper of the woman who raised 19-year-old Darion Marcus Aguilar, who shot two strangers and then himself on Saturday. Struggling for a reason to live. Her son, the younger of her two children, had not only taken his own life - an unbearable tragedy for a mother - he had taken the lives of two other young people.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 29, 2014
In all the reporting of the shootings at The Mall in Columbia, one sentence hit me like a punch in the gut. "His mother right now is struggling for a reason to live," said Ellis Cropper of the woman who raised 19-year-old Darion Marcus Aguilar, who shot two strangers and then himself on Saturday. Struggling for a reason to live. Her son, the younger of her two children, had not only taken his own life - an unbearable tragedy for a mother - he had taken the lives of two other young people.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | January 24, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - Ray Lewis had a chance to make the rest of his life a lot easier. All he had to do was give the Super Bowl media what they wanted yesterday. A dash of humility. A pinch of remorse. A pang of regret over his role in the unsolved double homicide that occurred after last year's Super Bowl in Atlanta. He wouldn't do it. "I'm not here to please the country," Lewis said during an hour-long session with reporters at Raymond James Stadium. Too bad. It wouldn't have taken much from him to drain a lot of the emotion from a tragic, volatile issue that lacks resolution and, thus, continues to simmer, casting a shadow over Lewis' on-field magic.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 24, 1992
On the day that Jeffrey Levitt finally beat the system, an insider in the legal fight over his $14 million swindle blinked his eyes in disbelief.''Parole after 7 1/2 years,'' he said softly. ''I never imagined it. I imagined 12 years, at least. I can't imagine how all those depositors feel.''For openers, Old Court Savings and Loan depositors feel thrilled to have any of their cash back. Levitt was the man who swiped their money with both hands, whose greed set off the state's dizzying savings and loan collapse.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge yesterday rejected a mentally handicapped man's request for a release from prison saying the man showed no "remorse" for a racially motivated attack that left the victim with brain damage.Daniel Spencer Porter, 22, was sentenced last April to a five-year prison term for shouting racial epithets during a July 1990 incident in Highlandtown. The victim, Herbert Jennings, a black man, was chased into traffic and fell under the wheels of a truck, suffering brain damage.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
A 41-year-old Elkridge man was sentenced to a year in jail yesterday in the death of a bicyclist he struck with his car on U.S. 1 in late 1998. Jeffrey L. Morris was convicted in the bicyclist's death after a lengthy trial in November before Howard County Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney. Morris was driving down U.S. 1 on Dec. 2 after a night of heavy drinking at a local bar when he struck and killed the bicyclist, Nick Prieto, 41, of Elkridge. Sweeney sentenced Morris to a year on the charge of homicide by a motor vehicle while intoxicated, and three years of probation upon his release.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has rejected a mentally disabled man's request for release from prison, saying the man showed no "remorse" for a racially motivated attack that left the victim with brain damage.Daniel Spencer Porter, 22, was sentenced last April to a five-year prison term in connection with a July 1990 incident in Highlandtown. The victim, Herbert Jennings, a black man, was chased into traffic and fell under the wheels of a truck, suffering brain damage. Porter was convicted of assault, reckless endangerment and racial harassment.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 2003
JAKARTA, Indonesia - An Indonesian court sentenced an Islamic militant to life imprisonment yesterday for his role in the Bali bombings that killed 202 people last year, many of them foreign tourists. The militant, Ali Imron, 33, an accused member of the Indonesian-based group Jemaah Islamiyah, was the only one of the defendants in the Bali case who had appeared to express remorse in court. The five-judge panel in Denpasar, the capital of Bali, said it had taken Imron's stated regrets into account but declined to hand down a 20-year sentence requested by the prosecution.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 29, 2013
Dear Whomever is in Charge of Customer Service for DirecTV: All I wanted was to watch the game. I was back in my hotel room after a long day, and I figured, what better way to unwind? Now, the game wasn't available on the hotel channels, but I've got that League Pass service you offer and one of its perks -- supposedly -- is that you can watch the game right on the ol' iPad. So I got out the ol' iPad and I fired up the app and I retrieved the password and I tried to sign in and nothing happened, so I called you guys and the robot lady answered and told me to OPRIMA NUMERO DOS if I wanted to conduct my business in Spanish, which I didn't, so I didn't and I said yes when the robot lady asked if I was a subscriber and I gave her my phone number when she asked for it and then she asked me to tell her what I wanted, and I tried to explain twice but she didn't get it, so I told her I had a question about League Pass and she gave me this long spiel about how I could buy League Pass, which I didn't need to do, since I already had it, so I asked the robot lady to connect me with technical support and she said she would and that's about when she hung up on me, so I called again and I went through the whole thing again and this time I got to a human being who listened to my problem and what I had done to solve it, expressed remorse, then told me to do the same things I had done, which had not worked the first time, and when I did and it didn't work again, this person...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 14, 2012
It's not unusual in politics for a party to nominate in haste and repent in leisure. In 2008, many Republicans feared before the election that they had chosen a loser in John McCain, and in 2004 many Democrats felt the same about John Kerry. It's known as buyer's remorse, and in both these cases, the concern was borne out in the outcome. Indeed, the phenomenon goes back at least to 1976, when the Democrats watched peanut farmer Jimmy Carter plod inexorably to their presidential nomination, and then were besieged with doubt about whether they had picked a loser.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2010
Stacie L. Price, the former PTA president at Johnnycake Elementary School, was given a suspended three-year prison term Monday after being convicted of stealing more than $9,000 from the organization. Price was also fined $500 and ordered to pay court costs, and must serve three years of unsupervised probation. Prosecutor Michael S. Fuller had asked the judge to send the 39-year-old defendant to jail, saying she had violated a position of trust by writing checks to herself from the PTA's bank account over six months and stopped only "because she got caught.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
Two banks, six minutes. Even by the standards set in Baltimore, Frederick McMillan was prolific. The 39-year-old, after being freed from federal prison for, you guessed it, robbing a bank, returned to his old habits and quickly made up for lost time. He held up 10 banks over 25 days last July. Police say that 47 banks were robbed in Baltimore City in 2009, meaning this one suspect was responsible for nearly 20 percent of all the holdups in one year. McMillan started his spree July 2 at the M&T Bank on West Baltimore Street, which would net him his second-largest haul — $4,097.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
Isla Fisher plays Rebecca Bloomwood, the title character in Confessions of a Shopaholic, as a woman whose hand-eye coordination works at top speed only when she's grabbing for a sale item. The funny idea behind her performance is that she's so distracted by hot dreams of buying stylish goods for bargain prices that she can't keep brain and body working together. You never believe, even in a fantasy way, that Bloomwood could stumble into a job at a Manhattan-based financial magazine for a Conde Nast-like conglomerate.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | July 22, 2008
Even during an interview that could have helped him receive a lighter sentence, 17-year-old Ronald Hinton blamed a relative's ex-girlfriend for the rape and murder of a child he had been baby-sitting in Northeast Baltimore. At sentencing yesterday, Baltimore Circuit Judge John Addison Howard made it clear that he did not appreciate the teenager's lack of remorse and ordered him to serve life plus 25 years in prison for the 2006 crime. Howard said the facts proved that Hinton's version of events was "absolutely untrue" and that he further victimized those he falsely accused.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICHARD A. SERRANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2006
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- Declaring himself neither insane nor delusional, Zacarias Moussaoui told the jury in his sentencing trial yesterday that he has "no regret, no remorse" for the nearly 3,000 people killed Sept. 11, 2001, and he appeared not to care whether he lives or is put to death. Moussaoui, testifying for the second time, also repeated his deep hatred for Americans and predicted another major terrorist attack on U.S. soil before the end of President Bush's term. He said the strike would be so catastrophic that the government would be forced to release him from prison.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | July 22, 2008
Even during an interview that could have helped him receive a lighter sentence, 17-year-old Ronald Hinton blamed a relative's ex-girlfriend for the rape and murder of a child he had been baby-sitting in Northeast Baltimore. At sentencing yesterday, Baltimore Circuit Judge John Addison Howard made it clear that he did not appreciate the teenager's lack of remorse and ordered him to serve life plus 25 years in prison for the 2006 crime. Howard said the facts proved that Hinton's version of events was "absolutely untrue" and that he further victimized those he falsely accused.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Kevin Rector,Sun Reporter | July 18, 2008
Weeping came from both sides of a Baltimore County courtroom yesterday where the drunken driver who fatally struck a Towson University freshman in an October hit-and-run was sentenced to 18 months in the county detention center. Matthew David Miller, 26, of Loch Raven Heights pleaded guilty in Baltimore County Circuit Court yesterday to one count of manslaughter by vehicle in the death of Kevin M. Ryan, 18, of Columbia, who was struck while walking on Hillen Road. Dozens of Ryan's family and friends filled benches on the right side of the courtroom, while almost as many of Miller's family and friends filled the left.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
As the sun rose over the Atlantic in the early hours of April 15, 2003, an Ocean City police officer pulled his squad car into the parking lot near the inlet that separates Assateague Island from the carnival rides of the boardwalk. He had been sent there to investigate a report of a suspicious car, parked facing the water with its lights on. In the Hyundai Santa Fe, the officer saw a cell phone hooked to a charger, a handbag and an empty bottle of hydrocodone. Next to the purse, the officer wrote in his report, were a set of keys and a letter written in a gentle cursive on lined yellow notebook paper.
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