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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 31, 1992
Anybody who thinks Baltimore's garment-making industry is a thing of the past should visit 419 W. Baltimore St.But don't ask to buy anything."We're strictly wholesale, and we carry the better goods," says ,, Herbert Guss, the ebullient owner of a warehouse full of Irish linen, Japanese cottons, Chinese silks and New Zealand wools.Mr. Guss is the downtown survivor of the city's textile jobbers, a merchant who sells a tremendous stock of odd-lot fabrics to dry goods stores, custom tailors and clothing manufacturers.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
Today it's best known for the pagoda, summertime jazz concerts and some of the city's best sledding. But an archaeological dig planned for Patterson Park's Hampstead Hill seeks to revive a largely forgotten 200-year-old story. While most know Fort McHenry's role in the Battle of Baltimore, thanks to Francis Scott Key and "The Star-Spangled Banner," few know or remember what transpired on the hill overlooking the harbor. Buried there could lie remnants of the trenches that helped Baltimore fend off advancing British land forces and end the War of 1812.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 1990
Some remnants of Baltimore Federal Financial FSA fetched $52,000 for the federal government as furniture, fixtures and equipment of the defunct thrift were sold at auction yesterday. The auction took place at the savings and loan's old administration building at 500 N. Calvert St.The auction was part of the effort by the Federal Resolution Trust Corp. to sell property and assets that the government acquired when it took over Baltimore Federal in February 1989. The federal agency is still attempting to sell $42 million worth of real estate owned by the thrift, including two branch operations, according to RTC spokeswoman Kate Spears.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
After $1.1 million in Superstorm Sandy clean-up work, Ocean City is ready for Memorial Day weekend and beyond, said Mayor Richard Meehan. Even the damaged century-old Ocean City Inlet Fishing Pier, which was featured prominently in national TV storm coverage, will be opening Friday. Meehan will mark the occasion by making the first cast from the 489-foot structure. "People from all over the country watched as that angry ocean tore apart that pier. Now, it's back in business," the mayor said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 21, 2000
Students in Howard County will have to go to school one day longer in June, thanks to remnants of Tuesday's snow and ice. The system included in its school calendar eight "inclement weather days" to be used at the end of the school year to make up for school closings because of bad weather, school system spokeswoman Patti Caplan said yesterday. School originally was scheduled to end June 11. Each inclement weather day taken would add another day to the end of the school year. If all eight make-up days were used, the system would seek approval from the state to add time to the school day. Superintendent John R. O'Rourke decided to close schools yesterday, as opposed to opening two hours late, because of the lingering iciness of side streets.
NEWS
July 14, 2006
Jazz concert -- 49 West Coffeehouse, Winebar and Gallery will present the Sarah Fridrich band at 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. July 22 at 49 West St., Annapolis. Fridrich (above) will give a jazz performance to include voice, acoustic guitar and piano. Tom Fridrich of the Remnants will be the drummer and Adam Hopkins will give a bass performance. Reservations are suggested. 410-626-9796 or www.sarahfridrich.com
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
In the late 1700s, a busy grain milling and textile center thrived in Howard County. Today, the remnants of its buildings and even its trash dump are providing valuable clues to 18th-century village life."
FEATURES
By Yolanda Garfield | June 2, 1991
Once upon a time, a starry-eyed young couple fell in love and got married. To save money, they rented a tiny apartment with barely room for two, except for the basement, which they intended to use as a bedroom. They placed their mattress on a plywood island near the furnace, water heater and racks of clothing, and resolved to clean up . . . or something . . . as soon as they returned from their honeymoon.Unbeknown to them, their friend and fairy godmother, designer Cheryl Duvall, could not bear to allow the newlyweds to return to the basement as it was. As a surprise wedding gift, she and six friends from Duvall/Hendricks, an architectural and design firm, pooled resources, and talents, and spent four weeknights and one Saturday waging a successful battle against the basement uglies.
FEATURES
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Doug Struck, The Sun's national correspondent, has traveled in Israel, Jordan, Iraq and Kuwait covering the war | March 10, 1991
It is difficult to fit the realities of war into the lives of people caught in it. They are such different scales.Baghdad was a weird calm in the days before the war. There seemed an inexplicable faith war would not come, and a resignation that it might. No one I talked to wanted it; there was no passion against Americans, Kuwaitis or anyone else to fuel a fever of war."War is something the politicians bring," said a sweet-faced grocer at a Baghdad fruit stall. "We do not want war."As the clock ticked ominously toward Jan. 15, the people I saw in Baghdad were average people worried about their families.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 14, 2009
Wind and waves from the powerful nor'easter that has pummeled the Mid- Atlantic coast since Wednesday have eaten away as much as a quarter of Ocean City's dune line. The sand will have to be replaced, city officials said, but the man-made storm barrier did its job. Other than street flooding and minor wind damage, the resort appears to have weathered the worst of the storm. "There were no instances of ocean water anywhere west of the dune line, and no damage that we can see from the ocean to any property along the oceanfront," said Mayor Rick Meehan.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
Isaac reached hurricane strength Tuesday afternoon and is poised to strike the Louisiana coast by tonight or early Wednesday -- find more on the storm's latest developments here . In the meantime, what could the storm mean for Maryland? It's too early to say. The storm's cone of probability calls for it to move through the Mississippi River valley late this week, and to turn eastward toward the Ohio Valley. That could mean rain for some parts of the country that desperately need it, but also flooding.
NEWS
By Haviland Smith | July 1, 2010
The recent arrest of 10 Russian citizens in America on charges of espionage at first blush appears to be a typical Cold War scenario. But it clearly is not. Human intelligence operations are uniquely equipped to ascertain an enemy's intentions. During the Cold War, the Soviet Union ran extensive intelligence operations against the United States. They targeted just about any American they could, many of whom were insignificant employees of the U.S. Government and members of the armed forces.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 14, 2009
Wind and waves from the powerful nor'easter that has pummeled the Mid- Atlantic coast since Wednesday have eaten away as much as a quarter of Ocean City's dune line. The sand will have to be replaced, city officials said, but the man-made storm barrier did its job. Other than street flooding and minor wind damage, the resort appears to have weathered the worst of the storm. "There were no instances of ocean water anywhere west of the dune line, and no damage that we can see from the ocean to any property along the oceanfront," said Mayor Rick Meehan.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 10, 2007
GUSEN, Austria -- Garden Street, Flower Street, Park Street. The bland names can be found in any Austrian village. The solid, two-story houses that line these streets, the BMWs in the driveways, the neatly trimmed hedges, potted geraniums and inevitable garden gnomes speak of contented middle-class normality. A few residents always knew the truth, but they chose to ignore it, or at least not to dig too deeply into it. Occasionally, when they dug in their backyards to install swimming pools, they were startled to find human skeletons.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 1, 2007
Liz Budge relishes the rustic quality of the dirt road that leads to her family's tree-shaded home in Union Mills. She worries that a county plan to pave Turkeyfoot Road will bring more traffic at higher speeds. On the other hand, her husband, Randy, eagerly awaits saying goodbye to gravel. The dust and dirt from the road sully his car, and the gravel washes away during rainstorms, making the road prone to potholes. "They do more maintenance down here than they would have to if they pave it," Randy Budge said, looking down at Turkeyfoot Road from his steep driveway.
NEWS
July 14, 2006
Jazz concert -- 49 West Coffeehouse, Winebar and Gallery will present the Sarah Fridrich band at 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. July 22 at 49 West St., Annapolis. Fridrich (above) will give a jazz performance to include voice, acoustic guitar and piano. Tom Fridrich of the Remnants will be the drummer and Adam Hopkins will give a bass performance. Reservations are suggested. 410-626-9796 or www.sarahfridrich.com
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | February 13, 1991
Like many of us, Kathy Gunst grew up in a home where leftovers either ended up in the trash can or came back to life hiding under a gloppy sauce.Leftovers were true to their name -- food that was unwanted, second best and, frankly, not worth eating.But a trip to France taught a then twentysomething Kathy Gunst that well-off Europeans were skilled at making great food out of scraps in ways that only Americans who lived through the Great Depression seemed to understand.The peels from carrots or leeks went into the soup pot, not the garbage disposal.
NEWS
By Haviland Smith | July 1, 2010
The recent arrest of 10 Russian citizens in America on charges of espionage at first blush appears to be a typical Cold War scenario. But it clearly is not. Human intelligence operations are uniquely equipped to ascertain an enemy's intentions. During the Cold War, the Soviet Union ran extensive intelligence operations against the United States. They targeted just about any American they could, many of whom were insignificant employees of the U.S. Government and members of the armed forces.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 6, 2005
PORT SULPHUR, La. - Paula Landry returned to her home yesterday to find a pile of wood scraps, an enormous tree snapped in half across her front lawn and a car buried in rubble. She also found an album filled with photos of her children, some of their baby clothes and a few pieces of her grandmother's crystal. It was enough. "I'm not coming back," said Landry, 58, a paramedic. She meant that she would leave the cleanup to others. Her eyes were red and her arms had goose bumps. She hadn't known it would be this hard.
NEWS
By Roger Roy, Jason Garcia and John Kennedy and Roger Roy, Jason Garcia and John Kennedy,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 12, 2005
PENSACOLA, Fla. - The damage and death toll continued to climb yesterday as authorities and residents tallied the widely scattered destruction left by Hurricane Dennis. While Dennis caused less damage than feared after its landfall Sunday east of Pensacola, it nonetheless was blamed for pockets of flooding and wind damage across a wide swath of the Panhandle. Gov. Jeb Bush toured storm-damaged areas yesterday, his visit delayed by lingering rough weather. Dennis was downgraded to a tropical depression but continued to dump heavy rain as it headed north.
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