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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 27, 2009
W hat do we call this decade? The Ohs? If you say that out loud it sounds like a certain baseball team. The Aughts? What's an aught? In a practical but infinitely more gloomy choice, Time magazine settled on "The Decade from Hell." And maybe it was. A new national poll found that most Americans have nothing nice to say about these last 10 years, whatever you call them. We reached new depths of national tragedy on a September morning in 2001. After Hurricane Katrina, we learned that the kind of chaos that ensues after a natural disaster in a Third World country can happen here.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Dorothy V. Thomas, a retired city public school educator who lovingly guided students at Windsor Hills Elementary School for nearly two decades, died June 10 of respiratory failure at Summit Park Health and Rehabilitation Center in Catonsville. She was 98. "Mrs. Thomas was such a powerful and phenomenal influence on my life and all of her students. She was old-school, and her commitment went beyond the classroom," said Sidney Clifton, a former student who is now a Hollywood producer.
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NEWS
By R. D. Apperson | January 18, 1995
As when the birds come home againat Winter's bitter end,may I return to you in time,my sweet, once great beleaguered landand we may share our blessings then;for I will bear a stronger heartthan that which brought and left me herewith soul neglectedsearching for the sun;though peace has yet to find me,I, in tilling, seek to find it finallythere within the landand from the land my soul be lifted upto find you in the joy of it and peacewill come and take me...
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Brandon Finney worked at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center for only a few months, but he had quickly earned a reputation as hardworking and motivated. His hospital colleagues came Tuesday — some in pink scrubs— along with other mourners to the chapel at the Vaughn C. Greene Funeral home in Randallstown to pay their respects to the young father. Finney died last week after he was fatally shot on his way home from work as he waited at a Saratoga Street bus stop. Police said Finney was an innocent bystander who was used as a human shield amid a gang fight between the rival Black Guerrilla Family and the Bloods.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 14, 2006
Before he said all those ridiculous and offensive things that defined him for a new generation of Democrats, William Donald Schaefer was the most popular, effective and entertaining public official in Maryland, and those of us who cringed at his behavior in recent years will no doubt remember him that way. I've said it before: It's almost too hard to write about Recent Schaefer because his disparaging remarks were sufficiently self-destructive and because...
SPORTS
By Steve Jacobson and Steve Jacobson,Newsday | October 21, 1990
CINCINNATI -- Somewhere, somebody will be storing this World Series in his memory bank. The World Series always presents something to remember -- sublime or ridiculous. To each his own.There was the vendor in the upper deck at Dodger Stadium who made an art form of tossing peanuts and catching the change without missing a beat of banter. "It's over," he pronounced to the dismay of Los Angeles Dodger fans when the 1978 New York Yankees took the lead. "The team that comes from behind is ahead."
NEWS
September 11, 2002
The Sun invited a variety of Marylanders to share their thoughts on the first anniversary of 9/11. Here are their responses. Being on scene at Ground Zero changed a life As a police officer, I was able to spend time in New York working at Ground Zero. I tell people that to see the scene on television or in pictures doesn't compare to actually standing on the site. To see the destruction and realize you are standing in the middle of it was as indescribable then as it is one year later.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 1995
Could it be that everybody was wrong about Madonna?According to the conventional wisdom, Madonna is one of the era's premiere hype artists. More media manipulator than musician, her success has had more to do with marketing and well-orchestrated outrage than anything you could put on a compact disc. Sure, her singles are catchy and sound good in clubs, but her singing? It is to laugh.Well, stop snickering. With the release of the greatest-ballad-hits collection, "Something to Remember" (Maverick 46100, arriving in stores today)
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 15, 1999
You won't find finer journalistic musings on the possibilities and the pratfalls of the human condition than in the writing of Chicago Tribune columnist Mary Schmich.She doesn't know it yet, but Schmich has stumbled upon a rather amazing, not to mention downright amusing, solution to an incessantly vexing problem shared by computer users everywhere.Schmich's Solution brilliantly addresses a computer user's need to come up with hacker-resistant computer passwords that one can actually remember.
NEWS
By Josh Getlin and Faye Fiore and Josh Getlin and Faye Fiore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 2003
NEW YORK - America marked the second anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks yesterday with a poignant ceremony at Ground Zero, where 200 children who lost parents and other relatives read the names of all 2,792 people who died there. Heart-breaking messages like "I love you, Daddy" echoed through the site on a warm, cloudless day that was eerily like the morning when terrorists struck the nation. In Washington, President Bush led a moment of silence on the South Lawn of the White House at 8:46 a.m., marking the instant the first hijacked plane hit the World Trade Center.
NEWS
September 28, 2014
Of all the offices in the federal government, the job of attorney general may be one of the toughest as well the most thankless. Eric H. Holder, who announced last week that he is stepping down as the nation's top law enforcement official six years after becoming the first African-American ever to hold that position, was no stranger to the controversy that comes with the job nor to the endless stream of criticism directed at its occupants. His tenure was not perfect - the failure to crack down sufficiently on the financial speculators who brought our economy to ruin being perhaps the greatest shortcoming.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The Scunny Memorial Paddle, which ran from Sept. 16 to 21, turned out to be even less fun than Christopher Furst, a marketing director for Power Plant Live, thought it would be. And the novice kayaker didn't go in expecting the 175-mile kayak trip was going to be a day at the beach. "In all honesty, it was the hardest thing I've ever done in my life. I've played every sport, baseball, football," Furst said, "but this was sheer endurance, paddling eight hours a day in an uncomfortable position.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 11, 2014
Paul Blair doesn't have a statue behind center field at Camden Yards, and he wasn't honored by the Orioles with a uniform patch this season after he passed away last December. But he does have a legion of fans in Baltimore who plan to honor him with signs and cheers when the Orioles and the New York Yankees play a doubleheader at Camden Yards on Friday. The grassroots tribute to a guy who was arguably the greatest defensive center fielder in club history began earlier in the week when Baltimore City Council Chairman Bernard C. “Jack” Young introduced a resolution honoring Blair, who made his major league debut with the Orioles 50 years ago this past Tuesday.
NEWS
September 9, 2014
Janay Rice's public message today about the Ravens' decision to cut her husband, running back Ray Rice, and the NFL's decision to ban him for life after a video was published showing him knocking her unconscious is likely to have precisely the opposite of the effect she desired, drawing more attention to what is for her, a painful family matter. In a post on her Instagram account, Ms. Rice condemned the media and the public for causing her family anguish and forcing them to relive "a moment we regret every day. " She added: "If your intentions were to hurt us, embarrass us, make us feel alone, take all happiness away, you've succeeded on so many levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
I hope those who know Joan Rivers only from her work the last couple of decades on shows like “Fashion Police” will take the time to read some of the appreciations that talk about who she used to be. Rivers, who died Thursday at age 81 after being on life support since Aug. 28, was a fearless, cutting-edge and transgressive comedian straight from Greenwich Village in the 1950s and '60s, who made it possible for the likes of Amy Schumer and...
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
- More than 100 relatives, friends and neighbors gathered for a candlelight vigil Friday night in the southeastern part of the city to honor the life of Morgan State freshman defensive lineman Marquese Meadow. Mourners stood outside the home of Benita Meadow, Marquese Meadow's mother, to reflect on the life of the 18-year old, who died on Sunday, two weeks after collapsing during a practice on Aug. 10. An autopsy revealed that complications related to heat stroke caused Meadow's death, which was ruled accidental.
SPORTS
March 21, 2006
Good morning --NFL commissioner -- Before you apply, remember, you have to work some Sundays.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
"One voice! One community!" they chanted. And later, "Enough is enough!" As rush hour traffic passed by, dozens of people joined hands at a gas station near Fort Meade on Monday to remember a man killed this month while trying to earn a living. Rajinder Kumar, 49, was fatally shot Aug. 7 during his overnight shift at the Exxon station at Ridge Road and Route 175 in Hanover. A man came into the store, shot the clerk and took an undetermined sum of money, according to police. Kumar, who colleagues said sent his earnings to his wife and children in India, was Muslim; last week the Anne Arundel County Muslim Council chipped in money with the FBI and Metro Crime Stoppers to offer an overall $27,000 reward in the case.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Devin Cook's community college lacrosse coach said that the 20-year-old, a business major who was active in lacrosse leagues around the city, wanted to use sports as a way of getting a scholarship and completing college. He had recently earned enough - he worked two jobs - to buy a car and was taking his fellow lacrosse players at the Community College of Baltimore County home after a game last Thursday night. They were stopped in the car on Wilern Avenue in Park Heights when a gunman killed Mr. Cook and wounded his passenger, a fellow lacrosse player.
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