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NEWS
April 16, 2012
You end your editorial on the Buffett Rule ("The Buffett Rule backlash," April 13) with the question, "Where will the $50 billion come from to balance the budget, if not from this minimum tax plan?" Here's the answer: From less spending! George B. Wroe, Glyndon
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2014
It is unbelievable that the cream of the crop of our youth, university graduates who have completed 18 years of education, do not know how to safely cross a highway, a skill I learned in second grade ( "University of Maryland, city officials urge pedestrian safety on U.S. 1," July 7). If irresponsible people make irresponsible decisions, who bears the responsibility for the consequences? To place the burden on Maryland taxpayers is irresponsible and wrong. Bill Garrison - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
January 28, 2014
So, Dan Rodricks actually thinks it's unbelievable that there are people who feel that "you don't expect that kind of thing to happen to you," as he was reportedly told by an 18-year-old worker in the aftermath of the shootings at the Mall in Columbia ( "Expecting the horrible is the American way Jan. 25). Mr. Rodricks reports that he had to ask the worker at the mall, not once, but twice, "Really?" Well, guess what, Dan? Yes, there are those of us who are surprised when such events happen.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
After a federal judge found that Maryland's historically black colleges face unfair and unconstitutional competition from the state's predominantly white universities, the parties headed into negotiations this month to work it out. But even with the far-reaching court decision, some worried the rights of black institutions wouldn't be protected and tried to put the judge's ruling on the books as state law. "I'm normally not a Doubting Thomas,"...
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to The Sun | January 3, 1999
Q. I am desperate for a remedy for canker sores. My mouth is just full of them and they are so painful I am having trouble eating. My doctor prescribed Aphthasol, but it didn't help. My dentist has offered antibiotics and strong steroids, but nothing has worked.A. Physicians don't know what causes canker sores (aphthous ulcers), but a deficiency of folic acid, vitamin B-12 and iron may contribute. Prescription treatments are not always effective.We recently heard from D.W. in Garland, Texas, whose mother was a dental assistant in the 1930s.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 2000
WASHINGTON - Showing a keen interest in dividing Microsoft Corp. into three new companies, a federal judge signaled yesterday that he will bring the antitrust case to a swift close with an order to break up the software giant. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson, at a hearing lasting nearly three hours, gave his first reactions to competing proposals for ways to remedy Microsoft's violations of antitrust law that he had found earlier. Jackson seemed inclined to embrace a breakup proposal, rather than just limit remedies to required changes in the company's behavior.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporter | May 8, 2008
Tracy L. Palmer was furious when she learned that a Prince George's County judge had decided to reduce her abuser's prison sentence, but attorneys told her it was too late to do anything about it. She fought on anyway, arguing that since she did not receive notification of her ex-boyfriend's attempt to reduce his sentence as required by law, she was entitled to a new hearing and the chance to object. The circuit judge agreed, reversed himself and sent the man, Sharden B. Hoile, back to prison.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
When Shelly and David Sturtz bought their house in the Running Deer development near Gamber last fall, they did not expect to own waterfront property.But whenever it rains, a torrent of water nearly a foot deep crosses their front yard, angles toward a neighbor's house and cuts a swath through the back yard to a spring in a ravine about 300 yards away.On sunny days, the Sturtz yard looks as if an 18-wheeler has driven through through it. Parallel ruts created by the runoff from steep yards higher up in the development are about 3 feet wide and 6 to 8 inches deep.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 1, 2000
WASHINGTON - With a corporate breakup order looming, Microsoft Corp. made a last-minute plea yesterday to a federal judge to give it strong protection against letting rivals use its secret software codes to clone Microsoft products before any split occurs. The huge software company repeated, in strong terms, its basic argument that it should not be split up. The plan by the Justice Department and 17 states to break Microsoft into two companies, it said, "is extreme and unjustified." But most of the company's final filing assumed a breakup is inevitable and focused on ways to protect Microsoft's inventions and its secrets in the meantime.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Federal and state officials urged a federal judge yesterday to split up Microsoft Corp. -- the most drastic remedy available for law-breaking by a monopoly. Though bandied about for days in leaks and rumors, the release of the details on how officials want to divide the company could send fresh shockwaves through the computer-driven "new economy." The 12-page remedy, suggesting the launching of a pair of big software corporations with separate identities and missions, is only a proposal.
NEWS
January 28, 2014
So, Dan Rodricks actually thinks it's unbelievable that there are people who feel that "you don't expect that kind of thing to happen to you," as he was reportedly told by an 18-year-old worker in the aftermath of the shootings at the Mall in Columbia ( "Expecting the horrible is the American way Jan. 25). Mr. Rodricks reports that he had to ask the worker at the mall, not once, but twice, "Really?" Well, guess what, Dan? Yes, there are those of us who are surprised when such events happen.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Baltimore County officials say they are setting aside $3 million generated from the state-mandated stormwater management fee to help nonprofit organizations pay for projects that will reduce the fees they have to pay. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said last week that the projects - namely removing impervious paving so that water can flow more freely - can help reduce the amount of runoff going into local waterways and the bay. Once hard surfaces...
NEWS
December 10, 2013
On Sunday morning, I ventured out to do my grocery shopping before the snow storm arrived. Being a native of Western New York, I favor the familiar offerings of Wegmans, so I have little difficulty justifying the drive from Baltimore to Columbia every week. As I was leaving the store, the snow had begun in Columbia, and I anticipated some slow going for the drive home. I progressed up Route 29, and the snow became heavier to the point of obscuring the lane lines. People from snowy areas would not call this heavy snow since visibility was still fair, but it was persistent and a healthy amount creating challenging driving conditions.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
Ah, to be in the U.S. economy of 1990s, a decade when the gross domestic product grew by about one-third and unemployment dropped from 7.5 percent to 4 percent. In 1993, the federal government raised the tax on gasoline to 18.4 cents per gallon, an increase of more than 30 percent from the previous year, and business boomed. Since then, the cost of a gallon of unleaded gasoline has more than doubled, yet the per-gallon federal excise tax has remained unchanged. States have raised their fuel taxes to keep up as best they can with local transportation needs, but the federal government's source of revenue has stagnated, a problem worsened by the fact that people are driving less and using more fuel efficient vehicles.
NEWS
October 13, 2013
A federal district court judge handed Maryland's historically black colleges and universities a partial and in many respects problematic victory last week. She denied them the monetary damages they sought but ruled that the state may not allow its traditionally white schools to unnecessarily duplicate their popular, unique academic programs. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake said such duplication has the effect of perpetuating the inequalities inherent in the dual system of higher education established during the era of segregation, and thus illegally discriminates against black students.
NEWS
By William C. Baker | September 30, 2013
In recent testimony before a U.S. Senate subcommittee, Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman inaccurately depicted her county and others in Maryland as unsuspecting victims of a 2012 state law dealing with "stormwater utility fees. " The fact is Anne Arundel, like other counties, is contributing significant polluted runoff to the Chesapeake Bay and therefore must do more to fix that problem. Let me clear up the record following Ms. Neuman's testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 24, 2000
Q. I was interested in your column about the person who used yellow mustard for indigestion. I want to provide some positive feedback: I tried the mustard remedy for indigestion over the past couple of days and am amazed and delighted that it works. A. We thank the reader who suggested a teaspoon of yellow mustard for heartburn. Apparently the yellow coloring, turmeric, has long been used for digestive disorders. You are not the only one who remarked on this home remedy: "I was fascinated to read that someone else takes yellow mustard for heartburn.
NEWS
By Norman Hawker and Robert Lande | May 16, 2011
The Department of Justice's antitrust case against Microsoft was one of the largest and most carefully watched in history. The courts ruled that Microsoft illegally maintained its monopoly of personal computer operating systems (OS). After years of oversight of a "behavioral remedy," the department's notoriously weak settlement with Microsoft expired Thursday. After the finding of liability and almost a decade of monitoring Microsoft's behavior, the net result has been to leave Microsoft pretty much where it started — with its Windows monopoly intact.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Jim Wilson retired from the federal government four years ago, he and his wife moved to Kent Island, where they initially enjoyed watching ospreys fishing in Northwest Creek from their waterfront home. But now, Wilson and most others living around the creek stay out of the murky water, which has turned yellow-green the past two summers. Even the ospreys steer clear of it, he said. Fish kills and stubborn "blooms" of blue-green algae, which at times form a floating scum, plague Northwest Creek.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
The best that can be said for the Supreme Court's ruling on affirmative action in college admissions is that it did not immediately and totally ban the practice. But the decision to send a University of Texas at Austin case back to the appeals court from which it came with instructions that the circumstances be scrutinized more closely certainly suggests that the justices are dubious about the continued need for the policy. That's hardly an encouraging sign as the court readies for a ruling in a case on whether a critical section of the Voting Rights Act - one that requires certain Southern states to have changes in voting law screened by the U.S. Department of Justice - is not constitutional after nearly five decades in use (and despite unsuccessful legal challenges in the past)
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