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NEWS
By Henry B. Reiff | June 7, 1998
Recently, the trustees at the City University of New York voted to eliminate remedial education programs at its 11 four-year schools. Mayor Giuliani heralded the trustees for their "courageous vote." Meanwhile, a number of Maryland legislators have become vocal critics of remedial education in two-and four-year state institutions of higher learning. The CUNY decision undoubtedly will heat up this smoldering debate on the role of colleges in preparing unprepared students who wish to attend college.
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NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | May 10, 2011
Nancy Grasmick will retire in June. The accolades pouring in upon her announcement formed an instant hagiography of the woman who for 20 years has led Maryland's public schools. "Dr. Grasmick leaves a luminous legacy and because of her vision, every student in the state will have an opportunity to achieve academic success," wrote Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings, in a statement typical of those about her. The swelling tide of students who graduate from state public high schools without basic reading or math skills should halt her beatification and shatter the myth of the state's unparalleled public schools, however.
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NEWS
By Louise Mirrer | June 7, 1998
In the wake of a recent decision by the City University of New York Board of Trustees, all remedial instruction will soon be phased out at the system's senior colleges. This is a bold, and to many, a shocking move, for it comes at a time when increasing numbers of students are entering the nation's public colleges and universities with inadequate preparation for the demands of college-level work.At the City University last year, 41 percent of first-time freshmen at the bachelor's degree level required at least one remedial course.
NEWS
By Henry B. Reiff | June 7, 1998
Recently, the trustees at the City University of New York voted to eliminate remedial education programs at its 11 four-year schools. Mayor Giuliani heralded the trustees for their "courageous vote." Meanwhile, a number of Maryland legislators have become vocal critics of remedial education in two-and four-year state institutions of higher learning. The CUNY decision undoubtedly will heat up this smoldering debate on the role of colleges in preparing unprepared students who wish to attend college.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Andrea Siegel and Larry Carson contributed to this article | September 25, 1996
Nearly half of all freshmen who went straight from high school to Maryland's public colleges and universities in 1994-1995 needed at least one remedial class because they could not do college-level work, according to a report presented yesterday to the State Board of Education.Among the nearly 200,000 students at public campuses statewide -- including adults returning to college and transfer students -- about one in four was "under prepared," requiring remedial classes that cost about $17.6 million that year.
BUSINESS
By Harry Milling and Harry Milling,Special to The Evening Sun | January 7, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has challenged Maryland's business community "to mix it up" with the state's politicians to improve Maryland's ailing public school system.The challenge came yesterday at the State House in Annapolis as the governor and the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education launched a joint venture by the corporate community and the state to improve education.The Roundtable is under the auspices of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce and Maryland Economic Development Associates, a quasi-public economic development group more commonly known as MEGA.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1996
Martin Miller and Ivan Leshinsky water, watch and worry over dozens of tree seedlings in their Brooklyn nursery -- not unlike their nurturing of troubled juveniles."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1995
Roughly 17,500 graduates marched off from Maryland public high schools to college campuses across the state in 1993. Trouble is, more than one-third of them went there to enroll in a high school class.A new government study finds that these Maryland freshmen are not ready to handle college-level courses in reading, writing and arithmetic. That level is typical of the past few years, according to SOAR -- the third-annual Maryland Student Outcome and Achievement Report."We're acutely aware of this," said Denny Gulick, a math professor at the University of Maryland College Park who is chairman of the school's general education committee.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 8, 1993
It could have been just another summer, hanging around the '' house, looking for things to do. But for about 385 Harford County young people and another 200 in Cecil, the summer has been filled with learning "life skills" and getting some practical job experience.The first appeal was the money, according to youths in the program, like 18-year-old Dawn West. "Jobs are hard to find because everyone wants someone who is older and has experience," she said. Ms. West graduated from Havre de Grace High in June.
NEWS
August 13, 1992
Equal TreatmentUpon reading your article about a mother who was held on $100,000 bail for abandoning her children, a thought struck me. Why not arrest fathers as well?Tom MorrisTowsonBoarding Schools for Poor KidsThose who study economic conditions in Third World societies are familiar with the vicious-circle paradigm -- an interlocking web of circumstances that seems destined to perpetuate poverty for generations.When we look at the problems of American inner cities, the situation seems little different.
NEWS
By Louise Mirrer | June 7, 1998
In the wake of a recent decision by the City University of New York Board of Trustees, all remedial instruction will soon be phased out at the system's senior colleges. This is a bold, and to many, a shocking move, for it comes at a time when increasing numbers of students are entering the nation's public colleges and universities with inadequate preparation for the demands of college-level work.At the City University last year, 41 percent of first-time freshmen at the bachelor's degree level required at least one remedial course.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
Kwadwo Asafo-Adjei came to Howard Community College hoping to be a doctor someday. But for now, he spends 14 hours a week repeating high school classes because he came unprepared for college-level work."
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Andrea Siegel and Larry Carson contributed to this article | September 25, 1996
Nearly half of all freshmen who went straight from high school to Maryland's public colleges and universities in 1994-1995 needed at least one remedial class because they could not do college-level work, according to a report presented yesterday to the State Board of Education.Among the nearly 200,000 students at public campuses statewide -- including adults returning to college and transfer students -- about one in four was "under prepared," requiring remedial classes that cost about $17.6 million that year.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1996
Martin Miller and Ivan Leshinsky water, watch and worry over dozens of tree seedlings in their Brooklyn nursery -- not unlike their nurturing of troubled juveniles."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1995
Roughly 17,500 graduates marched off from Maryland public high schools to college campuses across the state in 1993. Trouble is, more than one-third of them went there to enroll in a high school class.A new government study finds that these Maryland freshmen are not ready to handle college-level courses in reading, writing and arithmetic. That level is typical of the past few years, according to SOAR -- the third-annual Maryland Student Outcome and Achievement Report."We're acutely aware of this," said Denny Gulick, a math professor at the University of Maryland College Park who is chairman of the school's general education committee.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 8, 1993
It could have been just another summer, hanging around the '' house, looking for things to do. But for about 385 Harford County young people and another 200 in Cecil, the summer has been filled with learning "life skills" and getting some practical job experience.The first appeal was the money, according to youths in the program, like 18-year-old Dawn West. "Jobs are hard to find because everyone wants someone who is older and has experience," she said. Ms. West graduated from Havre de Grace High in June.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
Kwadwo Asafo-Adjei came to Howard Community College hoping to be a doctor someday. But for now, he spends 14 hours a week repeating high school classes because he came unprepared for college-level work."
NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | May 10, 2011
Nancy Grasmick will retire in June. The accolades pouring in upon her announcement formed an instant hagiography of the woman who for 20 years has led Maryland's public schools. "Dr. Grasmick leaves a luminous legacy and because of her vision, every student in the state will have an opportunity to achieve academic success," wrote Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings, in a statement typical of those about her. The swelling tide of students who graduate from state public high schools without basic reading or math skills should halt her beatification and shatter the myth of the state's unparalleled public schools, however.
NEWS
August 13, 1992
Equal TreatmentUpon reading your article about a mother who was held on $100,000 bail for abandoning her children, a thought struck me. Why not arrest fathers as well?Tom MorrisTowsonBoarding Schools for Poor KidsThose who study economic conditions in Third World societies are familiar with the vicious-circle paradigm -- an interlocking web of circumstances that seems destined to perpetuate poverty for generations.When we look at the problems of American inner cities, the situation seems little different.
BUSINESS
By Harry Milling and Harry Milling,Special to The Evening Sun | January 7, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has challenged Maryland's business community "to mix it up" with the state's politicians to improve Maryland's ailing public school system.The challenge came yesterday at the State House in Annapolis as the governor and the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education launched a joint venture by the corporate community and the state to improve education.The Roundtable is under the auspices of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce and Maryland Economic Development Associates, a quasi-public economic development group more commonly known as MEGA.
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