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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 3, 1993
In 1823, when Charles Willson Peale wrote to his son Rembrandt that "truth is better than a high finish," he summed them both up as portrait artists. For Charles Willson, the founder of the Peale dynasty of artists, truth was paramount. His most famous son, Rembrandt, often subordinated truth to other things, and a high finish was certainly one of them.At Washington's National Portrait Gallery, Rembrandt currently enjoys what is billed as his first large-scale exhibition. He may, in fact, be enjoying it considerably more than many of its visitors, for Rembrandt Peale is not the most satisfying of portraitists.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014
1778: Rembrandt Peale is born. 1801: Mastodon skeleton is excavated on a New York farm. Later will be Peale's opening attraction. 1814: The Museum and Gallery of Find Arts opens at 225 N. Holliday St. in Baltimore. Grand opening is about a month before the British attack on Fort McHenry. 1816: One of Rembrandt Peale's galleries is lit with gas lamps. Peale soon helps found the Gas Light Co. of Baltimore. 1822: A brother, Rubens Peale, takes over museum operations, bringing in live animals.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014
1778: Rembrandt Peale is born. 1801: Mastodon skeleton is excavated on a New York farm. Later will be Peale's opening attraction. 1814: The Museum and Gallery of Find Arts opens at 225 N. Holliday St. in Baltimore. Grand opening is about a month before the British attack on Fort McHenry. 1816: One of Rembrandt Peale's galleries is lit with gas lamps. Peale soon helps found the Gas Light Co. of Baltimore. 1822: A brother, Rubens Peale, takes over museum operations, bringing in live animals.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
After being closed to the public for nearly two decades, a new day may be dawning for the Peale Museum on Holliday Street if its planned restoration as the Peale Center for Baltimore History and Architecture comes to fruition. "I think it has lots of significance to Baltimore. It had been the city's first City Hall, an African-American school and where gas illumination was used by a company that eventually became BGE," said Walter Schamu, a partner in the firm of Schamu, Machowski, Grego Architects, which prepared restoration plans with consulting architect James T. Wollon Jr. "It's a handsome building that can be saved and given a new life," said Schamu.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2001
CHESTERTOWN - George Washington slept here. Really. They named the local college after him. What he did not do was pose for a portrait thought to have been the work of early 19th-century painter Rembrandt Peale. A painting of the first president that has hung in prominence at Washington College for nearly 60 years turns out to be a fake. Although the painting was considered the college's most valuable piece of Washington memorabilia when two Baltimore businessmen donated it in 1944, college officials aren't the least bit concerned about the revelation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
After being closed to the public for nearly two decades, a new day may be dawning for the Peale Museum on Holliday Street if its planned restoration as the Peale Center for Baltimore History and Architecture comes to fruition. "I think it has lots of significance to Baltimore. It had been the city's first City Hall, an African-American school and where gas illumination was used by a company that eventually became BGE," said Walter Schamu, a partner in the firm of Schamu, Machowski, Grego Architects, which prepared restoration plans with consulting architect James T. Wollon Jr. "It's a handsome building that can be saved and given a new life," said Schamu.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 10, 2002
Luther Vandross Spend an evening with singing star Luther Vandross and enjoy a blend of ballads, jazz, funk and R&B -- beginning at 7:30 tomorrow and Saturday at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Since his solo debut in 1981, Vandross has delivered such chart-topping hits as "Here and Now," "Endless Love," "Power of Love / Love Power" and "Don't Wanna Be a Fool." Tickets are $65.50-$75.50. Call 410-481-SEAT. Rembrandt Peale portrayal Trace the life of Rembrandt Peale, a renowned 18th- and 19th-century artist whose work included portraits of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 4, 1990
Stuffed animals. Live animals. The tattooed head of a New Zealand Maori chief. Gas lighting. The skeleton of a mastodon. Rembrandt Peale's portrait of Andrew Jackson. A night-blooming cereus. An Egyptian mummy. Two "learned dogs." Miss Honeywell, a woman without arms who made silhouettes. Four Sandusky Indians. Paintings of nude women, including Peale's "Dream of Love" and John Vanderlyn's "Ariadne."All of those items were exhibited at the Peale Museum in Baltimore between its opening in 1814 and 1829, and some of them are back at the same Holliday Street location for "Mermaids, Mummies & Mastodons," the new exhibit that attempts to trace, in the words of its subtitle, "the evolution of the American museum."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
A yellow fog swirls past the window-paneas night descends upon this fabled street:a lonely hansom splashes through the rain,the ghostly gas lamps fail at twenty-feet.-- From "221-B," a poem, by Vincent StarrettMost Baltimoreans scurrying past the now-shuttered Peale Museum on Holliday Street have little or no idea that it was the site of the founding of the American gas industry in 1816.It was that year, in the rooms of his home, that Rembrandt Peale -- member of the noted family of artists, inventor and entrepreneur -- amazed local citizens with a demonstration of a "ring beset with gems of light."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 7, 1998
On May 22, 1865, Asia Booth Clarke wrote a letter to a friend about the death of her brother. "The sorrow of his death is very bitter but the disgrace is far heavier," she wrote. Her brother was John Wilkes Booth, who a few weeks earlier had assassinated Abraham Lincoln and is buried in Baltimore's Green Mount Cemetery.The letter is one of the more interesting items in the well-meaning but uneven exhibit "Celebrating the Baltimore City Life Collections" that opens at the Maryland Historical Society today at 5 p.m. The show, a potpourri of everything from fine arts to hair dryers, contains about 160 items from the now-closed Baltimore City Life Museums.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 10, 2002
Luther Vandross Spend an evening with singing star Luther Vandross and enjoy a blend of ballads, jazz, funk and R&B -- beginning at 7:30 tomorrow and Saturday at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Since his solo debut in 1981, Vandross has delivered such chart-topping hits as "Here and Now," "Endless Love," "Power of Love / Love Power" and "Don't Wanna Be a Fool." Tickets are $65.50-$75.50. Call 410-481-SEAT. Rembrandt Peale portrayal Trace the life of Rembrandt Peale, a renowned 18th- and 19th-century artist whose work included portraits of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2001
CHESTERTOWN - George Washington slept here. Really. They named the local college after him. What he did not do was pose for a portrait thought to have been the work of early 19th-century painter Rembrandt Peale. A painting of the first president that has hung in prominence at Washington College for nearly 60 years turns out to be a fake. Although the painting was considered the college's most valuable piece of Washington memorabilia when two Baltimore businessmen donated it in 1944, college officials aren't the least bit concerned about the revelation.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
A yellow fog swirls past the window-paneas night descends upon this fabled street:a lonely hansom splashes through the rain,the ghostly gas lamps fail at twenty-feet.-- From "221-B," a poem, by Vincent StarrettMost Baltimoreans scurrying past the now-shuttered Peale Museum on Holliday Street have little or no idea that it was the site of the founding of the American gas industry in 1816.It was that year, in the rooms of his home, that Rembrandt Peale -- member of the noted family of artists, inventor and entrepreneur -- amazed local citizens with a demonstration of a "ring beset with gems of light."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 7, 1998
On May 22, 1865, Asia Booth Clarke wrote a letter to a friend about the death of her brother. "The sorrow of his death is very bitter but the disgrace is far heavier," she wrote. Her brother was John Wilkes Booth, who a few weeks earlier had assassinated Abraham Lincoln and is buried in Baltimore's Green Mount Cemetery.The letter is one of the more interesting items in the well-meaning but uneven exhibit "Celebrating the Baltimore City Life Collections" that opens at the Maryland Historical Society today at 5 p.m. The show, a potpourri of everything from fine arts to hair dryers, contains about 160 items from the now-closed Baltimore City Life Museums.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 3, 1993
In 1823, when Charles Willson Peale wrote to his son Rembrandt that "truth is better than a high finish," he summed them both up as portrait artists. For Charles Willson, the founder of the Peale dynasty of artists, truth was paramount. His most famous son, Rembrandt, often subordinated truth to other things, and a high finish was certainly one of them.At Washington's National Portrait Gallery, Rembrandt currently enjoys what is billed as his first large-scale exhibition. He may, in fact, be enjoying it considerably more than many of its visitors, for Rembrandt Peale is not the most satisfying of portraitists.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 4, 1990
Stuffed animals. Live animals. The tattooed head of a New Zealand Maori chief. Gas lighting. The skeleton of a mastodon. Rembrandt Peale's portrait of Andrew Jackson. A night-blooming cereus. An Egyptian mummy. Two "learned dogs." Miss Honeywell, a woman without arms who made silhouettes. Four Sandusky Indians. Paintings of nude women, including Peale's "Dream of Love" and John Vanderlyn's "Ariadne."All of those items were exhibited at the Peale Museum in Baltimore between its opening in 1814 and 1829, and some of them are back at the same Holliday Street location for "Mermaids, Mummies & Mastodons," the new exhibit that attempts to trace, in the words of its subtitle, "the evolution of the American museum."
NEWS
By Margaret Buchler and Margaret Buchler,Contributing writer | November 17, 1991
It was a time when the public's imagination walked on long legs, and"wond'rous curiosities" like mummies, mermaid skeletons and electricity were exhibited by showmen like P. T. Barnum.The early 1800s were the era of the Peale family, headed by Charles Willson Peale, inventor, artist and collector of nature's wonders. His son, Rembrandt Peale, founded Baltimore's Peale Museum in 1814, now the oldest museumbuilding in the Western Hemisphere.Thirteen Howard County elementary students got a glimpse of the Peales' zealous curiosity last month when they entered the museum's pilot program, "Great Expectations."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 26, 1995
...TC Hung Liu's presence in Baltimore brings us more than her own exhibit, "Can-ton: The Baltimore Series." Because of her work here, three portraits by the great early American painter Charles Willson Peale, all associated with the city but never before shown publicly in Baltimore, are on view as part of an exhibit at the Peale Museum.They are portraits of the family of Capt. John O'Donnell, who initiated Baltimore's trade with China in 1785 and gave the name Canton to the part of East Baltimore that has borne it ever since.
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