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Susan Reimer | June 30, 2011
It isn't wedding bells that are breaking up that old gang of mine. But it has started to happen, just as I've been afraid it would. Susan and her husband, Fred, are the first to defect, returning to their New England roots, in part to be near family members who need them. And I have to say I didn't see this one coming. I thought it might be Ruth who would leave our Annapolis neighborhood first. She has talked about giving up her house and traveling with her dog. Or Bob and Patty across the street.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
As the Maryland Renaissance Festival prepares to open for its 2014 season on Saturday in Crownsville, hearings are looming on the festival's proposal for a future move to Lothian. The festival is seeking zoning approval to move to a farm in Lothian. Anne Arundel County's administrative hearing officer denied the festival the zoning approvals it needed. The festival appealed to the county's Board of Appeals, which has scheduled six nights of hearings for the case. The first hearing will be held from 5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. on Sept.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris | May 11, 2012
New Howard County schools Superintendent Renee Foose recently inked a four-year, $250,000 deal that includes a provision that allows her to be reimbursed for up to $25,000 in relocation costs. Foose will be moving from the neighboring Frederick County to Howard, where she must reside as superintendent. According to the state's Department of Assessments and Taxation website, she currently lives in a 1,531-square-foot, single-family home on .27 acres in New Market . The house is two stories and has a basement, according to the site.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Baltimore officials plan to divert $3 million in anticipated casino revenue that had been earmarked for community improvements to replace a major artery in the city's underground steam pipe system. The proposal has drawn criticism from local elected officials and community leaders who say it is a misuse of the funds to be generated by the new Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. They want the money to be used for neighborhood-oriented projects, such as walking trails or efforts to connect unemployed residents with jobs.
NEWS
By Kenneth N. Harris Sr | October 5, 2000
THE NEWS THAT poor black families from the inner city would be relocated to more affluent areas in Northeast Baltimore brought much of the uproar you might expect. There were comparisons to the previous failed attempts -- namely Patterson Park and Park Heights -- to transplant welfare recipients from public housing into these working-class neighborhoods. But now, the American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit, which spurred this new action, is forcing Baltimore to deal with the issue again.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1992
PHH Corp. said yesterday that it has consolidated its global relocation and real estate management operations under Stephen A. Fragapane, a senior vice president at PHH and president of its relocation subsidiary.The Hunt Valley-based business-services company said the move was designed to provide comprehensive business services worldwide and to smooth international moves for business executives and their families."Many of our large transnational clients, such as Digital and Exxon in the United States; Monsanto Canada Inc., Canadian National Railway and the Bank of Nova Scotia in Canada; and Rolls-Royce, British Petroleum and IBM in Europe need a relocation service provider with capabilities that cross geographic boundaries," PHH Chairman Robert D. Kunisch said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 25, 1992
Like many couples scouring the residential real estate market these days, Chuck and Eileen Slater were looking for a steal. They had outgrown and sold their three-bedroom Cape Cod in Ridgewood, N.J., and wanted to take advantage of depressed home prices in the New York metropolitan region.The Slaters weren't disappointed. After a brief search, they found a four-bedroom, federal-style home on a third of an acre in Ramsey, N.J., for $340,000. Not exactly a fire-sale price, but far lower than comparable homes in the affluent community.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | August 27, 1995
"Democracy on Trial: The Japanese American Evacuation and Relocation in World War II," by Page Smith. New York: Simon & Schuster. 476 pages. $27.50In the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, 110,000 residents of Japanese ancestry living in America were forced to leave their homes and relocate to government-operated centers across the West. The reason cited was the security of the nation, even though the majority of the evacuees were loyal American citizens. In a compelling and meticulously researched book, historian Page Smith attempts to explain the complex and conflicting forces that led to the wholesale roundup of Japanese-Americans, the Issei (their Japanese-born parents)
BUSINESS
By From Staff Reports | September 22, 1994
Direct Marketing Associates Inc. intends to pull 250 jobs from the city when it relocates to the Halethorpe section of Baltimore County early next year.The direct-mail firm has contracted to purchase a vacant 360,000-square-foot building previously occupied by the Maryland Paper Box Corp. for roughly $4 million, where it plans to relocate by early next year, said Terry Woods, a vice president and a company principal.The purchase was made possible through a $6 million industrial development bond approved Monday by the Baltimore County Council.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1991
When Michael and Kristen Mordenti decided to buy their first home, they were disappointed to discover that, despite a withering recession, new-home builders weren't willing to negotiate on price.When the Mordentis turned to resales, they discovered a seldom-considered segment of the market where sellers are almost always motivated to negotiate and the properties are often upgraded to look like new.In June, the Mordentis purchased a three-bedroom Victorian in Baltimore for $17,500 less than the asking price.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
What remarkable lives they led. The five men, who hailed mostly from the pinnacle of French aristocracy, were liberals who threw off their own privileges to build a more equitable society. Individually, they danced with Marie Antoinette, fled the guillotine, spied for their country and played a role in a slave revolt in Haiti. All five relocated to Philadelphia, and in just a handful of years managed to exert a lasting impact on the fledgling United States of America. Francois Furstenberg, an associate professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, follows the exiles on their American adventures in his new book, "When the United States Spoke French.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Clifton Wilson, an inmate at the state's Eastern Pre-Release Unit, spent last week in the great outdoors, relocating oysters from cages on private piers near Thomas Point on the Chesapeake Bay to a sanctuary in nearby Glebe Bay. To the North East resident, it was a throwback to growing up near waters teeming with wildlife. For state officials eager to help rebuild the oyster population, Wilson's work was an example of getting people involved in the Marylanders Grow Oysters program.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Two companies announced plans Monday to relocate to Baltimore from the suburbs, bringing more than 300 jobs to downtown and Locust Point. The Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund will move its headquarters from Annapolis to the expanding McHenry Row mixed-use project in Locust Point by fall 2015, bringing its 240-person workforce. And Kao USA Inc., a unit of a Japanese beauty products company, will move from Hanover to offices at One Charles Center, with 70 workers. MAIF, a state-created entity that insures drivers who can't get private-market coverage, will lease two floors to be built atop the Phillips Seafood headquarters building on Fort Avenue.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The battle between birds and bureaucrats is over — and both sides won. With a helping hand from a state carpenter, an osprey couple finally got a home with a view of the water on the eastern end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. And the Maryland Transportation Authority, which manages the toll facility, finally got the pesky birds to stop nesting in front of cameras that keep an eye on traffic on busy U.S. 50 below. It's a happy ending to a story that has gone viral over the last several days, generating buzz on social media and even attracting the attention of CNN and Fox News.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Since last June, Towson University radio station WTMD has upgraded its studio, its satellite reception and now adds the headliners of First Thursdays, its free outdoor concert series that takes place between May and September, to the list. Rock stalwarts The Hold Steady (Sept. 4), blues brothers Los Lonely Boys (June 5), "One of Us" singer Joan Osborne (May 1) and sunny pop-folkers The Mowgli's (Aug. 7) are scheduled to take the First Thursdays stage this year, Scott Mullins, the station's program director, told The Baltimore Sun. A headliner for the July 3 event is still to be determined.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Parked drivers waiting at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport for calls from just-landed loved ones will have to do so from a new location starting April 1. The airport's so-called "cell phone lot" will move from one side of Terminal Road to the other, adjacent to the airport's daily parking garage, officials said Thursday. The move will double the number of parking spots in the free waiting area from 50 to 100. It will also add additional spaces to the airport's "express" parking lot, which offers luggage assistance and "carside-to-curbside" shuttle services.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
Residents of Wagner's Point wrote this week to 10 petrochemical companies whose plants ring the tiny South Baltimore neighborhood, asking their chief executives to make "modest" financial contributions to a buyout and relocation of the neighborhood."
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and Blair Ames, Baltimore Sun Media Group | January 13, 2014
A global company that manufactures spice concoctions for the food industry is building a new North American headquarters in Hampstead, relocating its operations from Baltimore County. The German-based Fuchs Group, which bought Old Bay creator Baltimore Spice in 1990, will close its two Baltimore County locations, consolidating its business in a new, larger, 200,000-square-foot facility on a 20-acre property in the North Carroll Business Park that is currently farmland. Construction in Carroll County could start by the end of the year, Fuchs North America CEO Dan Cooper said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
The Baltimore County police department's personnel section was consolidated into a single county-wide office this week, a spokeswoman said. Five police department employees will move from police headquarters on Joppa Road to the Baltimore County human resources office on Allegheny Avenue in Towson, said county spokeswoman Lauren Byrd. One employee will be transferred to corrections. "It only made sense to consolidate locations. No positions will be cut, however, with time and attrition, the number of positions may become fewer," she said.
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