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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2003
Mark Stevenson of Lakeport, Calif., requested a recipe that his friend and wife made out of zucchini and yellow crookneck squash. "It was wonderful on hamburgers and hot dogs. I've not had contact with these friends for four years and have searched for this recipe but can't find it. I'd appreciate your help." Mrs. Wally A. Hoggatt of Rogers, Ark., responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. She wrote, "I've used a hand grinder with a coarse blade for years, but with a food processor it will be quicker.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Ravens defensive tackle Kapron Lewis-Moore waited exactly 19 months from his final college football play to suit up in a competitive game, and even though it was just the preseason, Lewis-Moore relished Thursday night against San Francisco. “I'm feeling so excited,” Lewis-Moore said after the game. “That's my first game back for a while, and I was just glad to go out there and have some fun. Obviously there are some things I need to keep working on, but … it's the preseason, we're still in training camp, and we've got a lot of time to get better and everything.” Lewis-Moore, the Ravens' sixth-round pick in 2013 out of Notre Dame, missed all of last season while recovering from surgery on a torn right ACL. He went down in the 2013 BCS National Championship game, a bad loss for the Irish that was made worse for Lewis-Moore by the injury.
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FEATURES
By Patsy Jamieson | June 26, 1996
"Let's just throw something on the grill" is a familiar refrain around my house this time of year. Thanks to the outdoor grill, summer promises a more relaxed approach to cooking and entertaining.Perhaps for that reason, it is my favorite cooking season (at least one of my favorites).As a cooking method, grilling has many advantages: the caramelized surfaces and slight smokiness created by cooking over coals or a gas flame intensify and enhance food's intrinsic flavors.But there is a downside to grilling.
NEWS
Kit Waskom Pollard | April 25, 2014
In Maryland, one true harbinger of spring is fresh local asparagus. At Mountain Branch Grille & Pub, executive chef Lee Glanville pairs crunchy grilled stalks of the vegetable with seared scallops, bright corn relish and a smoky and savory tomato vinaigrette. The result is a riot of colors and flavors celebrating the return of spring. SEARED SCALLOPS WITH ASPARAGUS, CORN RELISH AND SMOKED TOMATO VINAIGRETTE Serves four Scallops and asparagus: 12 U/10 dry pack diver scallops Salt and pepper to taste 4 Tablespoons olive oil, divided 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter 20 large asparagus spears, trimmed for grilling 2 cups corn relish 1 cup smoked tomato vinaigrette 1. Prepare grill to cook over high heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | May 15, 2008
Joan Osborne should have been a much bigger star. Relish, her 1995 major-label debut, sold more than 3 million copies, spurred by the No.1 smash "One of Us." The video for the controversial song - whose chorus asked, "What if God was one of us/Just a slob like one of us ... " - was a constant on MTV. Osborne was also a hit on the Lilith Fair tour that year. But four years passed before she released Righteous Love, the proper follow-up to Relish. The album flopped. Osborne and her label, Mercury, parted company.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 21, 1998
Two concerns frequently confront me when I entertain. The first is time. Like countless others, I do not have enough of this commodity, so I am always searching for good dishes that can be prepared in short order. The other concern involves cooking with less fat, because more and more of my guests are zealots about counting fat grams. So, I have been challenged to come up with menus that are simple yet delicious, and at the same time moderate in fat.Not long ago, I prepared such a meal for my husband and me. On a hectic weeknight, after both of us had spent the day at work, I lightly brushed some beautiful tuna steaks with garlic oil and then sprinkled them with salt and pepper.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
Get ready for a surprise in your own back yard. The hottest thing off the grill won't require the usual hot-dog relish or ketchup on the side -- unless you mix your favorite condiments with mango-ginger-lime mojo or maybe Thai fish sauce and cilantro. Ethnic foods are sizzling this season. The trend is so hot it's penetrated that distinctly American institution, the backyard barbecue, land of propane- and charcoal-fed flame, smoke and tong-wielding men dressed in silly aprons. These foods are "the biggest thing in barbecue right now," says Dave DeWitt, editor and publisher of Fiery Foods and Barbecue magazine and a longtime industry observer.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | July 21, 2004
ON A RECENT summer afternoon, I sat in a small new restaurant in northeast Baltimore County relishing hot dogs. Zack's is a sparkling 20-seat eatery that opened in April in the 8900 block of Old Harford Road, just north of Joppa Road. It promises "hog dogs with an attitude," and, judging by my visits, it lives up to its motto. It treats the hot dog with culinary respect and the proper bun, yet remembers it is basically fun fare. I had the $3.25 Chicago-style classic dog. This is a Vienna Beef frank with a natural casing, steamed, topped with a sweet, bright-green relish, sliced tomatoes, fresh onions, a pickle wedge, celery salt and hot peppers on a poppy-seed bun. It was a quintessential Chicago experience, missing only the roar of the L, the whip of the wind and the fading of the Cubs.
FEATURES
By SUZANNE LOUDERMILK | June 23, 1999
Cheers for chutney, a versatile relishTake a seat, salsa. Chutney is stepping up to the plate. According to the July-August issue of Metropolitan Home, chutney is the newest condiment to dazzle American cooks. This versatile Indian relish, with its range of spiciness and textures, adds interesting flavors to ordinary dishes. The magazine's editors suggest coconut chutney to perk up a sandwich or a pear-cranberry version to go with roast duck or chicken.The selling of couscousCheck out the new TV commercial on couscous.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun Reporter | October 3, 2006
It was only last October when the Ravens trailed in Pittsburgh by one point with 1:36 remaining and quarterback Anthony Wright couldn't move the offense past midfield. Now, it seems like the Ravens relish delivering fourth-quarter rallies after winning back-to-back games in the final minute - the first time they have done so in the eight-year Brian Billick era. Ravens@Broncos Monday, 8:30 p.m., ESPN, Ch. 13, 1090 AM, 97.9 FM Line: Broncos by 3 1/2
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
In 2005, when he was released from his Major League Soccer contract with Real Salt Lake after one season, Mike Lookingland considered two options. One was to try to find a new MLS team. The other option, however, just felt right. "Even when I was playing in the MLS, I used to always talk up the Baltimore Blast," he said. "I always knew in my heart that's where I wanted to play. So as soon as I got released, I called [Blast general manager] Kevin Healey and asked if the Blast had any room for me. He said 'Yeah, we have one spot left.'  To play for my home team ... it's been a dream come true.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Josh Pratt hadn't met Tim Stedman until this year, but the two men who share similar athletic and educational backgrounds quickly found they have common ground in other areas as well. They are about the same age and both have young children, and they discovered they lived just a few minutes from each other in Crofton. These days, Pratt takes his young son to watch youth football games in which Stedman's son plays. "It's a small world," says Pratt, 42. "We hit it off. " But those particular mutual interests aren't what brought Stedman, 41, the athletic director at Chesapeake Science Point Public Charter School in Hanover, and Pratt together.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
"Maybe you want it to be bad. " So spoke a Stephen King character in his epic novel, "The Stand. " I was struck by the line when I read it in the early 1980s, and it still gives me a bit of a psychological shudder. It's a twisted sentiment. And it's probably something I've thought a time or two in my life. Yikes. More recently, however, it's seems to describe The Sun's stable of sportswriters, or at least the ones covering the Orioles. They want it to be bad. I love following the O's. What a great season last year and what a promising season so far this year.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
WASHINGTON - A year ago, C.J. Fair and top-seeded Syracuse left Boston's TD Garden unfulfilled after losing to No. 2 seed Ohio State in the NCAA tournament's East Regional final. Fair had done little to help, taking just two shots and scoring eight points in a seven-point loss to the Buckeyes. Fair and his Syracuse teammates had a much different feeling leaving Verizon Center on Saturday night. Not only did the fourth-seeded Orange advance to its first Final Four in a decade with a 55-39 win over third-seeded Marquette, but the former City standout played a big part in the victory.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
SARASOTA. Fla. - Jason Pridie will be the first to admit his mistake. The 29-year-old outfielder has spent most of the past six years on the cusp of finding a home in the big leagues - his life-long dream just within reach. But around this time last season, Pridie's very public miscue had him worried that he might have handed himself a career-crippling sentence into baseball purgatory. Last March, Pridie was fighting for a roster spot in Oakland Athletics' spring training camp when he received a 50-game suspension for a second failed test for a recreational drug - a "drug of habit" as Major League Baseball calls it. First failed tests are kept confidential.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2012
The text messages started rolling in before Corey Graham even had a chance to settle in front of his locker late Sunday night following the finest game of his NFL career. They came from friends, former coaches and old teammates. They came from people whom he speaks to regularly and others that the Ravens cornerback hadn't seen in years. At one time, Michael Clark fit into both of the latter categories. Clark is Graham's older brother and best friend throughout his childhood. That relationship continued even after Clark was sentenced to prison for five years for possession of cocaine and marijuana with intent to deliver, but left Graham, then a freshman at the University of New Hampshire, feeling like he was on his own. Those days are long over.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and By Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | July 28, 2004
Ripe from the Orchard This summer, Giant has introduced "Orchard Perfect" fruit at its 198 stores. The line of summer fruit, which is exclusive to the grocery chain, is vine-ripened and picked when ready to eat. The fruit is then placed by hand into single-layer cartons to prevent bruising and shipped immediately at the ideal temperature. The line includes peaches, nectarines, pluots and plums. You can try out some of those summer fruits with this frittata recipe from the California Tree Fruit Agreement: In a heavy, ovenproof 10-inch fry pan, saute 1 clove of minced garlic and 1 small, thinly sliced onion in 1 tablespoon of olive oil until wilted.
NEWS
By Celestine Sibley | August 5, 1993
A FRIEND was telling me she is going to Rome this month, and before I thought, I said, "Too bad it has to be in August."She looked dejected but rallied to say she is grateful for the trip, no matter the weather or calendar.I rallied, too. The truth is that I love old seedy August, hot and dusty and brassy as it undoubtedly will be. The summer season is winding down. The cool breath of autumn will touch our sweat-damp brows any day now.The July flies will step up their chorus in the trees at sundown, the plumes of goldenrod, not yet ready to show color, will nonetheless be plumping up.School supplies and shoes and sweaters are appearing in back-to-school ads. My old-time country neighbors, most of whom have moved away or died, would be very busy in August canning or freezing the fruits from their gardens.
SPORTS
By Yvonne Wenger and Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
After cheering on the Orioles at Yankee Stadium, Michael Cochran made it back to his Canton home about 3 a.m. Saturday — just in time to steal a few hours of sleep before waking up at 7 to run a half-marathon in the Baltimore Running Festival. Cochran said he would have worn his Brian Roberts jersey for the race, but rowdy Yankees' fan spilled beer on him after the Orioles' 3-1 loss to the New York team in Game 5 of the American League Division Series. "I signed up for the race and made all of these plans, because normally [the Orioles]
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
In my first meeting with Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette back in January, he talked about appreciating Baltimore's rich baseball history and realizing that fans in this city were hungry for a winner. He talked about learning from the legendary Harry Dalton, who built the Orioles' dynasty teams from 1966 to '71. Duquette's first major league job was working under Dalton in Milwaukee. So Duquette could appreciate the excitement of Sunday's first postseason game in Baltimore in 15 years.
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