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Religious Persecution

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By Cal Thomas | May 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The persecution of Christians around the world finally got some attention the other day when a ''Freedom From Religious Persecution Act'' was introduced in the Senate by Arlen Specter, R-Pa., who is Jewish, and in the House by Rep. Frank Wolf, R-Va., who is an evangelical Christian.The man responsible for drafting the legislation, Michael Horowitz, is also Jewish, and a former top Reagan-administration official. Columnist A.M. Rosenthal of the New York Times, who is Jewish, is a strong supporter.
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NEWS
April 16, 2012
Wasn't this country founded out of the pursuit of religious freedom? If so, why is that basic right under constant attack, especially from the radical left? The birth of our country and the pursuit of religious freedom are indelibly entwined in the very fabric of this great nation. While the U.S. was and maybe still is predominantly Christian, we have first and foremost been the sanctuary for all religions and belief systems. The Founding Fathers were extremely tolerant and protective of the rights of others.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 21, 1994
If it's not one thing, it's another -- Hoping to forget about her sore right ankle, Tonya Harding accepted an invitation from a tall, handsome Norwegian to go horseback riding.The date ended abruptly when the young man ran out of quarters.Words of inspiration -- In preparation for today's game against Italy, the winless U.S. hockey team (0-1-3) flew to Lourdes and bathed in the sacred waters of the shrine's grotto spring.The players were then blessed by the local prelate, who added: "It might help if you knuckleheads play some defense."
NEWS
May 10, 2011
You quoted one of the participants in last week's National Day of Prayer event in Bel Air as saying that "this is like patriotism and spiritual work combined" ("Dozens gather in Bel Air to observe National Day of Prayer", May 6). The singing of the National Anthem and "America the Beautiful" at the Bel Air event highlighted the quasi-religious character of American patriotism. The "One-hundred Percent American" campaign of the World War I era unleashed a wave of enforced conformity that, ironically, shredded the Bill of Rights.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
Wasn't this country founded out of the pursuit of religious freedom? If so, why is that basic right under constant attack, especially from the radical left? The birth of our country and the pursuit of religious freedom are indelibly entwined in the very fabric of this great nation. While the U.S. was and maybe still is predominantly Christian, we have first and foremost been the sanctuary for all religions and belief systems. The Founding Fathers were extremely tolerant and protective of the rights of others.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 1993
BEIJING -- As President Jiang Zemin traveled to Seattle this month to meet with President Clinton for a tough discussion on human rights, the conventional wisdom was that China would not release any of its political prisoners as a concessionary move.bTC But now, Western officials and human rights activists say they have confirmed that two elderly Roman Catholic bishops, one of them paralyzed and severely ailing, were released Nov. 19 after three years in prison-like conditions.They have returned to their homes in Xushui County in Hebei province, church officials in Hong Kong said.
NEWS
May 10, 2011
You quoted one of the participants in last week's National Day of Prayer event in Bel Air as saying that "this is like patriotism and spiritual work combined" ("Dozens gather in Bel Air to observe National Day of Prayer", May 6). The singing of the National Anthem and "America the Beautiful" at the Bel Air event highlighted the quasi-religious character of American patriotism. The "One-hundred Percent American" campaign of the World War I era unleashed a wave of enforced conformity that, ironically, shredded the Bill of Rights.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | August 8, 1994
TWO MONTHS ago, President Clinton wiped out Asian human rights as a political, economic or diplomatic concern of his administration's foreign policy.He did this with the help and guidance of the American China lobby, which pays for its business profits in China by supporting the interests of the government in Beijing.But only the president himself could actually do the deed and only in one way -- by tearing up the promises he had made before and after the presidential campaign, including his own executive order.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 29, 1997
It was about 11:40 a.m. Monday when I walked out to my car. As I was about to put the key in the lock, I noticed the concrete brick on my driver's seat.Shards of glass surrounded the brick and covered the front passenger seat. The glove compartment was opened, its contents on the passenger's seat. The passenger-side window was gone.I didn't get upset. I couldn't. Losing two sisters and a brother in less than 16 months tends to make me keep my cool when far less serious things happen. Instead I muttered to myself, showing scarcely a trace of emotion, "This is not how I left this car."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 4, 2004
Moving Walls, the revelatory exhibition that opens tomorrow at Maryland Art Place, is a serious show about a serious subject that too often gets short shrift in an art world obsessed with celebrity and glitter. The show presents works by two photographers, Edward Grazda and Lori Grinker, whose images engage the clash of arms and religion that marks so much of the history of our time. The golden age of photojournalism lasted roughly from the founding of Life magazine in 1936 until its demise as a weekly publication in 1972.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 4, 2004
Moving Walls, the revelatory exhibition that opens tomorrow at Maryland Art Place, is a serious show about a serious subject that too often gets short shrift in an art world obsessed with celebrity and glitter. The show presents works by two photographers, Edward Grazda and Lori Grinker, whose images engage the clash of arms and religion that marks so much of the history of our time. The golden age of photojournalism lasted roughly from the founding of Life magazine in 1936 until its demise as a weekly publication in 1972.
TOPIC
By Adam Choppin | May 20, 2001
IN RECENT MONTHS, the 46-year-old conflict in Sudan has received renewed attention in American newspapers regarding the persecution of Southern Sudanese Christians by radical Northern Sudanese Muslims. Unfortunately, this gross oversimplification threatens to stoke the embers of religious fanaticism and make the world's deadliest and longest-running war even deadlier. The complex factors that divide the people of the Sudan (north and south) have given rise to two prolonged wars during most of the second half of the past century.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 29, 1997
It was about 11:40 a.m. Monday when I walked out to my car. As I was about to put the key in the lock, I noticed the concrete brick on my driver's seat.Shards of glass surrounded the brick and covered the front passenger seat. The glove compartment was opened, its contents on the passenger's seat. The passenger-side window was gone.I didn't get upset. I couldn't. Losing two sisters and a brother in less than 16 months tends to make me keep my cool when far less serious things happen. Instead I muttered to myself, showing scarcely a trace of emotion, "This is not how I left this car."
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The persecution of Christians around the world finally got some attention the other day when a ''Freedom From Religious Persecution Act'' was introduced in the Senate by Arlen Specter, R-Pa., who is Jewish, and in the House by Rep. Frank Wolf, R-Va., who is an evangelical Christian.The man responsible for drafting the legislation, Michael Horowitz, is also Jewish, and a former top Reagan-administration official. Columnist A.M. Rosenthal of the New York Times, who is Jewish, is a strong supporter.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | August 8, 1994
TWO MONTHS ago, President Clinton wiped out Asian human rights as a political, economic or diplomatic concern of his administration's foreign policy.He did this with the help and guidance of the American China lobby, which pays for its business profits in China by supporting the interests of the government in Beijing.But only the president himself could actually do the deed and only in one way -- by tearing up the promises he had made before and after the presidential campaign, including his own executive order.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 21, 1994
If it's not one thing, it's another -- Hoping to forget about her sore right ankle, Tonya Harding accepted an invitation from a tall, handsome Norwegian to go horseback riding.The date ended abruptly when the young man ran out of quarters.Words of inspiration -- In preparation for today's game against Italy, the winless U.S. hockey team (0-1-3) flew to Lourdes and bathed in the sacred waters of the shrine's grotto spring.The players were then blessed by the local prelate, who added: "It might help if you knuckleheads play some defense."
TOPIC
By Adam Choppin | May 20, 2001
IN RECENT MONTHS, the 46-year-old conflict in Sudan has received renewed attention in American newspapers regarding the persecution of Southern Sudanese Christians by radical Northern Sudanese Muslims. Unfortunately, this gross oversimplification threatens to stoke the embers of religious fanaticism and make the world's deadliest and longest-running war even deadlier. The complex factors that divide the people of the Sudan (north and south) have given rise to two prolonged wars during most of the second half of the past century.
NEWS
March 25, 2005
Reflecting religious and political tensions back in England, a Puritans vs. Catholics bloody clash played out in the Battle of the Severn of March 25, 1655. Present-day Annapolis was then a Puritan settlement called Providence. The settlers had come from Virginia, where they faced religious persecution, They were on the ourside circle of Oliver Cromwell's fearsome Roundheads force, which had recently beheaded the English king, Charles I. The Puritan Cromwell reigned over England as lord protector in the 1650s.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 1993
BEIJING -- As President Jiang Zemin traveled to Seattle this month to meet with President Clinton for a tough discussion on human rights, the conventional wisdom was that China would not release any of its political prisoners as a concessionary move.bTC But now, Western officials and human rights activists say they have confirmed that two elderly Roman Catholic bishops, one of them paralyzed and severely ailing, were released Nov. 19 after three years in prison-like conditions.They have returned to their homes in Xushui County in Hebei province, church officials in Hong Kong said.
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