Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReligious Organizations
IN THE NEWS

Religious Organizations

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 23, 2012
So now the Republicans want to turn the debate over requiring insurance companies to cover contraceptives into a debate about religious freedom? They argue no one should be forced to support (with their tax dollars) activities that conflict with their religious views. I'll set aside for the moment the argument that insurers covering free contraceptives actually save money in the long run due to reduced health-care costs. I'll also set aside the fact that most Catholic women don't agree with the all-male bishopric that is setting the rules for them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 3, 2014
All those who feel they must profess their faith before governmental meetings should realize that the rights of other faiths and non-believers are just as important as theirs ( "As Carroll debates prayer, founding fathers' faith comes into focus ," March 29). I think a moment of silence would be sufficient for individuals to call upon whatever force they feel will help them in their decision making. Christians should remember their history. Religion was used politically throughout time for world domination.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Andrew G. Sherwood and Andrew G. Sherwood,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
Ten religious organizations in Baltimore County will receive federal anti-terrorism grants to improve their security, county officials announced yesterday. The organizations, nine Jewish synagogues and schools and one Muslim group, will receive grants of up to $50,000 for security enhancements such as closed-circuit television systems, vehicle barriers and bulletproof glass, officials said. Ben Greenwald of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore described the funds as a necessity.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
Concerning the article, "Faith groups wrestling with stormwater fee" (Feb. 18), religious organizations should recognize that the camel's head is under the tent. Instead of joining together in an all-out opposition to this cleverly-worded tax (no, make that "fee") legislated by the General Assembly against only a portion of Maryland's citizens, the article seems to indicate various governments will give the faith groups (and other non-profits) something if they do something in return.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2004
Helping their congregations develop a deeper understanding of and friendship with God is a goal local religious organizations hope to accomplish in the new year. And, after those members have grown in their faith, the goal is to help them minister to others so that they can pass it on. Within the Christian Jail Ministry, a nonprofit organization that since 1979 has helped inmates at the Howard County Detention Center, the mission is constant. "We recognize that the one who can change a person's heart is Jesus, and we want to introduce him to any inmate willing to listen," said the Rev. Guy R. Nichols, lead chaplain and executive director of the organization.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2004
Helping their congregations develop a deeper understanding of and friendship with God is a goal local religious organizations hope to accomplish in the new year. And, after those members have grown in their faith, the goal is to help them minister to others so that they can pass it on. Within the Christian Jail Ministry, a nonprofit organization that since 1979 has helped inmates at the Howard County Detention Center, the mission is constant. "We recognize that the one who can change a person's heart is Jesus, and we want to introduce him to any inmate willing to listen," said the Rev. Guy R. Nichols, lead chaplain and executive director of the organization.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 19, 1997
MOSCOW -- With leaders of Russia's so-called "traditional" religions -- Russian Orthodox Church, Islam and Judaism -- sitting as guests in the government's box in Parliament, Russian legislators overwhelmingly passed new restrictions on minority churches yesterday.By a vote of 337-5, the State Duma, or lower house of Parliament, passed the law in less than a half-hour, without debate.International human rights groups have denounced the measure because it sets up two unequal categories of religion.
NEWS
March 29, 1995
AS Congress considers deep cuts in the current budget for national service programs, supporters of those cuts are insisting that voluntarism is on the rise in America and that there is no need for government to foot the bill for national service. However, new data from Independent Sector, a coalition of more than 800 voluntary organizations, foundations and corporate giving programs, has compiled data that is less encouraging.Respondents to its survey of trends in giving and volunteering report fewer household contributions to the arts since 1989.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
Saint Vincent College, a small Benedictine college southeast of Pittsburgh, wanted to realign a two-lane state road serving the campus. But the state transportation department did not have the money. So Saint Vincent tried Washington instead. The college hired a professional lobbyist in 2004, and, later that year, two paragraphs were tucked into federal appropriation bills with the help of Rep. John P. Murtha, a Pennsylvania Democrat, awarding $4 million solely for that project. College officials said the work would improve the safety and appearance of the road into the campus, which President Bush visited two days ago when he gave the college's commencement address.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 1997
Leaders of area religious organizations are wondering how to reach out to the poor in their communities in the wake of recent state and federal welfare reforms.Pastors, priests and rabbis throughout Maryland and Washington say they are optimistic about filling gaps left by changes in welfare programs, but they worry about meeting needs if and when government aid expires."It's a radical shift in the burden on churches. Our church is in the process of figuring out how to shift things in the budget to have more funds available for outreach," said Reginald Lee, pastor of Allen African Methodist Episcopal Church in Hillsboro.
NEWS
By Harry Knox | December 9, 2013
House Speaker John Boehner has said he would oppose a landmark gay-rights bill, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA), because its religious exemption is not broad enough. But the House speaker has it backward. The current religious exemption in ENDA is already too wide. For advocates of religious freedom like me, there is a crucial principle at stake: Religious exemptions should never become a tool of discrimination. They should be narrowly tailored to reduce the burden on a person's free exercise of religion.
NEWS
By Patrick Boyle | February 4, 2013
Over the past 103 years, America's churches have built the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) into the nation's most successful youth group - which makes it remarkable that the BSA stands ready to let gays join Scouting, thus publicly renouncing the wishes of some of its oldest and dearest friends. A proposal to let the local organizations that run Scout units decide whether to accept homosexual boys and leaders - to be voted on by the BSA board of directors this week - is monumental not only for Scouting but for what it says about the state of gay rights in America.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
So now the Republicans want to turn the debate over requiring insurance companies to cover contraceptives into a debate about religious freedom? They argue no one should be forced to support (with their tax dollars) activities that conflict with their religious views. I'll set aside for the moment the argument that insurers covering free contraceptives actually save money in the long run due to reduced health-care costs. I'll also set aside the fact that most Catholic women don't agree with the all-male bishopric that is setting the rules for them.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | January 23, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley will host a breakfast in Annapolis Tuesday with some gay activists and members of the religious community to discuss his bill legalizing same-sex marriage. The governor is expected to introduce his same-sex marriage bill this evening. He told reporters that the legislation will clarify exemptions for religious organizations that don't want to participate or honor same-sex unions. "If there's a difference [this year] it will probably be in regard to the respect for religious freedom and making that a little clearer in this bill," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley introduced legislation Monday night to legalize same-sex marriage in Maryland, presenting a bill to the General Assembly that aides said would offer broad protections for groups that would not want to perform or honor same-sex marriages. The governor, his staff and advocates worked throughout the day to hammer out language detailing religious protections. They distributed the new legislative language moments before the 8 p.m. session began. In an informal briefing with reporters earlier Monday, O'Malley said his bill would make religious protections "a little clearer" than they had been in last year's version of the measure.
NEWS
By Michele Gilman | August 3, 2008
Presidential hopeful Barack Obama says he plans to carry on the spirit, if not the details, of President Bush's faith-based initiative. Now, he may truly believe in the transformative power of these "charitable choice" initiatives - or he shrewdly may be trying to convert evangelical voters to the Democratic Party. Or both. Regardless, he should recognize that religious congregations have proved to be no substitute for trained professionals working on our most pressing social problems. During his administration, Mr. Bush welcomed religious organizations into the government contracting fold.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2001
The state's highest court struck down yesterday a Montgomery County measure that barred religious institutions from religious discrimination in hiring for jobs in which faith plays little or no role. The unanimous Court of Appeals ruling means that, from the minister to the floor mopper, religious institutions in the county can restrict hiring to persons of a particular faith. "Religious organizations can take out of this that religious organizations have autonomy in hiring - they are free to make faith-based decisions in hiring and firing," said Craig L. Parshall, attorney for the church-affiliated Montrose Christian School in Rockville, which won the case.
NEWS
September 24, 1997
THROUGHOUT MUCH of its turbulent history, the Russian NTC Orthodox Church has been part of the state machinery. Czars were its titular leaders until the 1917 Bolshevik takeover. And even though the clergy and the believers paid a horrible price in the persecution that followed, the church became an enthusiastic participant in Stalin's Great Patriotic War against Hitler. By the time communism collapsed, it had gained recognition as the official Soviet church in a state that advocated death to religions.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
Saint Vincent College, a small Benedictine college southeast of Pittsburgh, wanted to realign a two-lane state road serving the campus. But the state transportation department did not have the money. So Saint Vincent tried Washington instead. The college hired a professional lobbyist in 2004, and, later that year, two paragraphs were tucked into federal appropriation bills with the help of Rep. John P. Murtha, a Pennsylvania Democrat, awarding $4 million solely for that project. College officials said the work would improve the safety and appearance of the road into the campus, which President Bush visited two days ago when he gave the college's commencement address.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 23, 2006
BOSTON -- It was barely a week past the 2001 inauguration when the new president's plan to fund the "armies of compassion" was reported on the evening news with more than a touch of skepticism. The story of a White House office for faith-based initiatives was illustrated with a large cross and introduced with a question: "Is there a reason to be nervous?" This broadcast followed an election in which the three R's - religious, right and Republican - had been tightly woven. The minister at the inauguration had invoked Jesus Christ the savior, and millions of Americans, from Sikhs to Unitarians, had to choose between saying amen and feeling excluded.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.