Advertisement
HomeCollectionsReligious Intolerance
IN THE NEWS

Religious Intolerance

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Mark Mazzetti and Faye Fiore and Mark Mazzetti,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Pentagon investigation of reported harassment by Christian cadets and teachers found that the U.S. Air Force Academy had failed to accommodate people of non-Christian beliefs but had not engaged in "overt religious discrimination," a report released yesterday said. The conclusions by a team from Air Force headquarters acknowledged that religious slurs, jokes and disparaging remarks had been directed at non-Christian cadets. It said Christian professors used their positions as officers and authority figures to promote their faith.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 24, 2012
In "Understanding Arab anger" (Sept. 19), Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat professor for peace and development at the University of Maryland, claims that "the deepest sources of anger against America … pertain to the presence of U.S. forces in the Middle East and to U.S. policy toward the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. " This obscures how a marginal video - or Danish cartoons, a Salman Rushdie novel, or threatened Koran-burning by the pastor of a minuscule congregation - ignite violence throughout the Muslim world.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 6, 2007
At a time when religious intolerance seems more than ever in the news, the yearlong exhibition that opens today at the American Visionary Art Museum sounds a small but poignant note of sanity amid the current cacophony of doctrinal zealotry, hatred and fear. All Faiths Beautiful: From Atheism to Zoroastrianism is a show of about 200 works by "outsider" or visionary artists inspired by the universal human impulse to seek meaning and hope through the act of faith. If you go All Faiths Beautiful: From Atheism to Zoroastrianism runs through Aug. 31 at the American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 6, 2007
At a time when religious intolerance seems more than ever in the news, the yearlong exhibition that opens today at the American Visionary Art Museum sounds a small but poignant note of sanity amid the current cacophony of doctrinal zealotry, hatred and fear. All Faiths Beautiful: From Atheism to Zoroastrianism is a show of about 200 works by "outsider" or visionary artists inspired by the universal human impulse to seek meaning and hope through the act of faith. If you go All Faiths Beautiful: From Atheism to Zoroastrianism runs through Aug. 31 at the American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway.
NEWS
November 21, 1990
One of the startling contrasts at the 34-nation assemblage of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe is the self-assurance of NATO countries and the fretting that afflicts Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and other nations which have broken free of Moscow's grip.Their time for celebration occurred a year ago. Now they face a future in which they are very much on their own -- burdened with economies wrecked by Communist theory, plagued by ethnic and nationalist unrest, tied to a Warsaw Pact that will shortly be dismantled, held at arms length by their prosperous western neighbors and very much at sea about their future security.
NEWS
September 24, 2012
In "Understanding Arab anger" (Sept. 19), Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat professor for peace and development at the University of Maryland, claims that "the deepest sources of anger against America … pertain to the presence of U.S. forces in the Middle East and to U.S. policy toward the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. " This obscures how a marginal video - or Danish cartoons, a Salman Rushdie novel, or threatened Koran-burning by the pastor of a minuscule congregation - ignite violence throughout the Muslim world.
NEWS
By Jeff Griffith | December 22, 1991
Last week, we marked the 200th anniversary of the Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution.I say "marked" because we have less to celebrate than we might.Racism and intolerance are as endemic to our culture as ever. Sexism rages. Homophobia is stylish in many communities.What's new?Closer to home, religious intolerance, always sub rosa in our county, has surfaced in the usual way. So much for the First Amendment.A recent survey commissioned by the American Bar Association reveals that only 33 percent of us even know what the Bill of Rights is. AsPogo oft noted, "We have met the enemy, and he is us."
NEWS
By Darren M.Allen | September 15, 1991
No matter how subtle or unintentional, religious discrimination -- here in the land of the free, home of the brave -- still thrives.While it may not always take a very obvious tone -- say, like Ku Klux Klan rallies, skinhead marches or neo-Nazi hate fests -- it still is offensive and insensitive.And you don't really have to look too far to find it.Last Monday, at the start of a City Council meeting in Westminster, Mayor W. Benjamin Brown Jr. led the council and about 40 members of the publicin the pledge of allegiance.
NEWS
May 12, 2000
LET US pray that the audacious order of the county commissioners banning scheduled recreation activities on Sunday mornings will be rescinded. For the information of Commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier, this is not a "Christian nation" subject to the tyranny of whatever "majority" claims divine right of power. It is a nation of religious freedom and tolerance, of respect for differing beliefs and practices, of official separation of church and state. Admittedly, there is a cultural tradition in Carroll that consciously, practically limits official activities on Sunday mornings because many residents may have a conflict with worship services.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | June 13, 2004
Early on in Saved!, a gentle satire of life at an evangelical Christian high school, a student named Dean swims to the bottom of a pool with his girlfriend, Mary, and tells her that he might be gay. Stunned, Mary breaks for the surface, accidentally banging her head against a ladder. A bearded carpenter, working nearby, dives to the rescue. Before pulling Mary to safety, the carpenter morphs into Jesus Christ and tells her she must do everything she can to help Dean. How Mary interprets this apparent request from the Almighty is at the heart of Saved!
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Mark Mazzetti and Faye Fiore and Mark Mazzetti,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Pentagon investigation of reported harassment by Christian cadets and teachers found that the U.S. Air Force Academy had failed to accommodate people of non-Christian beliefs but had not engaged in "overt religious discrimination," a report released yesterday said. The conclusions by a team from Air Force headquarters acknowledged that religious slurs, jokes and disparaging remarks had been directed at non-Christian cadets. It said Christian professors used their positions as officers and authority figures to promote their faith.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | June 13, 2004
Early on in Saved!, a gentle satire of life at an evangelical Christian high school, a student named Dean swims to the bottom of a pool with his girlfriend, Mary, and tells her that he might be gay. Stunned, Mary breaks for the surface, accidentally banging her head against a ladder. A bearded carpenter, working nearby, dives to the rescue. Before pulling Mary to safety, the carpenter morphs into Jesus Christ and tells her she must do everything she can to help Dean. How Mary interprets this apparent request from the Almighty is at the heart of Saved!
NEWS
May 12, 2000
LET US pray that the audacious order of the county commissioners banning scheduled recreation activities on Sunday mornings will be rescinded. For the information of Commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier, this is not a "Christian nation" subject to the tyranny of whatever "majority" claims divine right of power. It is a nation of religious freedom and tolerance, of respect for differing beliefs and practices, of official separation of church and state. Admittedly, there is a cultural tradition in Carroll that consciously, practically limits official activities on Sunday mornings because many residents may have a conflict with worship services.
NEWS
By Jeff Griffith | December 22, 1991
Last week, we marked the 200th anniversary of the Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution.I say "marked" because we have less to celebrate than we might.Racism and intolerance are as endemic to our culture as ever. Sexism rages. Homophobia is stylish in many communities.What's new?Closer to home, religious intolerance, always sub rosa in our county, has surfaced in the usual way. So much for the First Amendment.A recent survey commissioned by the American Bar Association reveals that only 33 percent of us even know what the Bill of Rights is. AsPogo oft noted, "We have met the enemy, and he is us."
NEWS
By Darren M.Allen | September 15, 1991
No matter how subtle or unintentional, religious discrimination -- here in the land of the free, home of the brave -- still thrives.While it may not always take a very obvious tone -- say, like Ku Klux Klan rallies, skinhead marches or neo-Nazi hate fests -- it still is offensive and insensitive.And you don't really have to look too far to find it.Last Monday, at the start of a City Council meeting in Westminster, Mayor W. Benjamin Brown Jr. led the council and about 40 members of the publicin the pledge of allegiance.
NEWS
November 21, 1990
One of the startling contrasts at the 34-nation assemblage of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe is the self-assurance of NATO countries and the fretting that afflicts Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and other nations which have broken free of Moscow's grip.Their time for celebration occurred a year ago. Now they face a future in which they are very much on their own -- burdened with economies wrecked by Communist theory, plagued by ethnic and nationalist unrest, tied to a Warsaw Pact that will shortly be dismantled, held at arms length by their prosperous western neighbors and very much at sea about their future security.
NEWS
June 17, 1991
In an understandable attempt to combat racial and religious ** intolerance, many communities have passed laws to suppress offensive expressions of hatred. While well-intentioned, such laws only buy unnecessary trouble.A case in point involves the prosecution of a young man in St. Paul, Minn. who burned a cross on the lawn of a black family.The youth was convicted of violating a city law which makes it a crime to display any signs or symbols that express animus on the basis of race, religion or gender.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 2002
MOSCOW - President Vladimir V. Putin strongly denounced racial and religious prejudice yesterday during a meeting in the Kremlin with a 28-year-old woman who was seriously injured when she tore down an anti-Semitic sign attached to a bomb. "If we let this chauvinistic bacteria of either national or religious intolerance develop, we will ruin the country," Putin said in remarks prominently replayed on Russian television last night. Tatyana V. Sapunova, an office manager from Moscow, suffered serious injuries to her face, hands and legs May 27 when she stopped on a highway 20 miles southwest of Moscow and pulled down a poster scrawled with "Death to Yids" in thick block letters.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.