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NEWS
December 8, 2000
SOME PEOPLE SEEM to think that Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger is pulling a fast one by not signing the comprehensive rezoning ordinance covering the northern section of the county. They're convinced he's giving developers a 17-day window to slip in a subdivision or two before the more restrictive zoning takes effect. They should stop worrying. Mr. Ruppersberger's concern is about the impact of this ordinance on properties owned by religious institutions, not homebuilders.
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NEWS
March 25, 2014
Religion should never be allowed to be used as an excuse to opt out of civic and legal responsibilities that are required of society as a whole. Property taxes should be paid by those who own "houses of worship" exactly is required by personal house owners. Religious institutions should be just as responsible for the upkeep of the Chesapeake Bay, for example, as the general public. The Affordable Care Act is the law of the United States and religious beliefs should not be allowed to trump this.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
A City Council committee on Tuesday approved a 16 percent cut to Baltimore's proposed storm water fees. Under a plan that will go to the full council for a vote Monday, homeowners would pay $40 to $120 per year. That's down from a range of $48 to $144. The legislative committee, chaired by Councilman James Kraft, also approved a cap designed to help businesses avoid what some have called exorbitant fees. The measure would limit fees to 20 percent of property taxes. The committee also approved an 83 percent cut to the administration's proposed rates for religious institutions.
NEWS
January 2, 2014
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor made a reasonable decision when, on New Year's Eve, she temporarily blocked implementation of the Affordable Care Act's contraception coverage mandate in a case brought by a religious order of nuns that operates homes for the poor and elderly in Catonsville and elsewhere. It certainly doesn't hurt to wait a few days and hear the government's argument for immediate implementation. But the 11th hour drama doesn't change the fact that the contraceptive coverage requirement is good policy, and the mechanism for groups like the Little Sisters of the Poor to avoid violating their religious tenets is reasonable.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
Ten years ago, Rabbi Mark Panoff told his Temple Isaiah congregation in Columbia that one day their children would return to the planned community to raise their own families -- but the worshipers didn't believe him. Today, not only have a number of grown children returned to the temple, but so have their grandparents. "We've all settled down. We love Howard County and made our lives here," Panoff said. "We're becoming multigenerational. This is something new for us, something I think is a positive trend."
NEWS
October 30, 2012
The case for Question 6, which would affirm Maryland's law authorizing same-sex marriage, is simple. It upholds the principle that the law should treat everyone the same. Marriage is both a religious and a civil institution. Churches, synagogues and mosques have always set their own rules about which marriages they recognize, and this law does not change that fact. What it does is to ensure that no Marylander faces discrimination under the law when it comes to one of the state's fundamental institutions.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 7, 1997
JERUSALEM -- Jacqueline Koch Ellenson studies at a Jewish institute. She attends synagogue weekly. Her children speak Hebrew and belong to a religious youth group. But Ellenson says Israel's religious hierarchy makes her feel like "a second-class citizen."Ellenson is a Reform Jew from Los Angeles.A raucous debate is raging in Israel over religious pluralism. Since the state's founding, Orthodox Jews have controlled religious institutions. Only marriages and conversions performed by Orthodox rabbis are recognized.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
Thanks to the Sun's recent mischaracterization of the Maryland Catholic bishops' statement on religious freedom ("Bishops assail same-sex marriage," Nov. 10), many readers responded to one element - only five paragraphs long - of a 12-page document well worth reading carefully. The statement, "The Most Sacred of All Property: Religious Freedom and the People of Maryland," cites several examples of the problems that arise when government policies conflict with the deeply held moral and religious beliefs of individual citizens and religious institutions.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
Letter writer Kenneth Hoffmann's complaints against the "wealthy" Catholic Church and against all other religious institutions are ludicrous ("Church shouldn't complain about stormwater fees", June 14). I am a parishioner at a Roman Catholic Church on Belair Road (an impoverished urban area). The majority of our parishioners are retirees, many of them widows existing on small stipends. Our church receives daily multiple appeals for food, rent, utilities, medicines and other survival needs from our neighbors (most of whom are not Catholic)
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2003
The City Council weighed religious freedom against urban renewal last night and chose the latter, voting for a neighborhood redevelopment plan that prohibits new churches in part of Lauraville's business district. The council, which was unanimous in a provisional vote on the measure last night, will take final action Oct. 20. Aimed at storefront churches that have gobbled up commercial space, the plan prohibits new religious institutions on a 2/3 -mile stretch of Harford Road. "This is not anti-church.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
Letter writer Kenneth Hoffmann's complaints against the "wealthy" Catholic Church and against all other religious institutions are ludicrous ("Church shouldn't complain about stormwater fees", June 14). I am a parishioner at a Roman Catholic Church on Belair Road (an impoverished urban area). The majority of our parishioners are retirees, many of them widows existing on small stipends. Our church receives daily multiple appeals for food, rent, utilities, medicines and other survival needs from our neighbors (most of whom are not Catholic)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
A City Council committee on Tuesday approved a 16 percent cut to Baltimore's proposed storm water fees. Under a plan that will go to the full council for a vote Monday, homeowners would pay $40 to $120 per year. That's down from a range of $48 to $144. The legislative committee, chaired by Councilman James Kraft, also approved a cap designed to help businesses avoid what some have called exorbitant fees. The measure would limit fees to 20 percent of property taxes. The committee also approved an 83 percent cut to the administration's proposed rates for religious institutions.
NEWS
October 30, 2012
The case for Question 6, which would affirm Maryland's law authorizing same-sex marriage, is simple. It upholds the principle that the law should treat everyone the same. Marriage is both a religious and a civil institution. Churches, synagogues and mosques have always set their own rules about which marriages they recognize, and this law does not change that fact. What it does is to ensure that no Marylander faces discrimination under the law when it comes to one of the state's fundamental institutions.
EXPLORE
October 24, 2012
The case for Question 6, which would affirm Maryland's law authorizing same-sex marriage, is simple. It affirms the principle that the law should treat everyone the same. Marriage is both a religious and a civil institution. Churches, synagogues and mosques have always set their own rules about which marriages they recognize, and this law does not change that fact. What it does is to ensure that no Marylander faces discrimination under the law when it comes to one of the state's fundamental institutions.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 26, 2012
One of the first rules of politics is to re-energize the base when in trouble. Rarely have we observed such adherence to the rule as in the case of President Barack Obama. Economic growth is anemic. The high expectations (and optimistic predictions) that followed passage of the economic stimulus are a distant memory. A stubbornly high unemployment rate brings monthly negative headlines. There are more Americans living in poverty than ever before. And $5 trillion in new debt has caused at least one Wall Street rating agency to lower the country's credit rating.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 23, 2012
It's going to be bait and switch for as far as the eye can see. That's how it looks now that the smoke has cleared after the recent "Mommy war" skirmish over Democratic operative Hilary Rosen's comment that mother of five Ann Romney had "never worked a day in her life. " There's no need to relitigate all of that again. If Ms. Rosen apologized any more she'd have to sever a digit, Yakuza-style. And the White House couldn't distance itself more if they dispatched the Secret Service to burn down Ms. Rosen's house and salt the earth for good measure.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | November 2, 1992
Religious institutions would pay landlords less rent under a bipartisan bill coming before the council tonight.The bill, jointly sponsored by Shane Pendergrass, D-1st, and Darrel Drown, R-2nd, would offer tax credits to property owners who lease a portion of their property to religious institutions.The measure requires landlords to use those credits to reduce the rent they charge those religious institutions.The bill is one of 21 pieces of new legislation coming before the council this month.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2001
The state's highest court struck down yesterday a Montgomery County measure that barred religious institutions from religious discrimination in hiring for jobs in which faith plays little or no role. The unanimous Court of Appeals ruling means that, from the minister to the floor mopper, religious institutions in the county can restrict hiring to persons of a particular faith. "Religious organizations can take out of this that religious organizations have autonomy in hiring - they are free to make faith-based decisions in hiring and firing," said Craig L. Parshall, attorney for the church-affiliated Montrose Christian School in Rockville, which won the case.
NEWS
By Irwin E. Weiss | March 14, 2012
Much has been written and said recently about the First Amendment and freedom of religion in the context of the current political atmosphere. Many of the most provocative comments have been about contraception, abortion rights and health insurance. Some politicians and pundits claim that President Barack Obama is attacking religion or religious institutions. Presidential hopeful Rick Santorum stoked the fires by criticizing the 1960 speech given by John F. Kennedy when he ran for president.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
In arguing the First Amendment right of employers to choose what coverage they should be exempt from providing based on conscience, the Republicans who supported the Blunt amendment (and the three Democrats who sided with them) are guilty of short-sightedness and an absence of humility. The essence of the First Amendment is the right of all to their own interpretation of religion, not just the right to their own convictions. To maintain that order of tolerance, the First Amendment mandates that the government must not establish religion, but rather allow the practices of all people.
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