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Religious Discrimination

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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 26, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dillard's Inc.'s dismissal of a department store employee because she missed work to go on a religious pilgrimage was not religious discrimination, a federal appeals court has ruled.The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court decision that Dillard's, a 250-store chain, owed Mary Tiano more than $16,000 in back wages for refusing to restore her job when she returned from a pilgrimage to the former Yugoslavia.The three-judge panel in San Francisco ruled that Tiano, a Roman Catholic, couldn't prove religious bias because she didn't show that the timing of the pilgrimage was part of a religious calling rather than a personal preference.
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NEWS
June 7, 2013
Bob Ehrlich's recent column claiming that multiculturalism destroys democracy takes a very Eurocentric view of America ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2). It selectively glosses over some of the ugly things our nation has done on its way to becoming who we are today. The idea that America was built on a foundation of economic and political freedom, regardless of class, economic status or education, is a pleasant fiction, but the reality was quite different. When our country was founded, only white, land-owning males were allowed to vote.
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NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Mark Mazzetti and Faye Fiore and Mark Mazzetti,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Pentagon investigation of reported harassment by Christian cadets and teachers found that the U.S. Air Force Academy had failed to accommodate people of non-Christian beliefs but had not engaged in "overt religious discrimination," a report released yesterday said. The conclusions by a team from Air Force headquarters acknowledged that religious slurs, jokes and disparaging remarks had been directed at non-Christian cadets. It said Christian professors used their positions as officers and authority figures to promote their faith.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
Reading The Sun's pious outrage at U.S. Marines urinating on dead Taliban fighters reminded me of Nietzsche's remarks on decadent religions - cultures so wrapped up in the make-belief worlds of the afterlife that they've come to devalue life in this world ("Despicable and destructive," Jan. 13). But instead of hand-wringing about the sacredness of dead bodies, how about harnessing the new-found appreciation of humanity among the Taliban and Afghan President Hamid Karzai to draw attention to the barbaric and inhumane practices that are accepted as the cultural standard in their region?
NEWS
January 16, 2012
Reading The Sun's pious outrage at U.S. Marines urinating on dead Taliban fighters reminded me of Nietzsche's remarks on decadent religions - cultures so wrapped up in the make-belief worlds of the afterlife that they've come to devalue life in this world ("Despicable and destructive," Jan. 13). But instead of hand-wringing about the sacredness of dead bodies, how about harnessing the new-found appreciation of humanity among the Taliban and Afghan President Hamid Karzai to draw attention to the barbaric and inhumane practices that are accepted as the cultural standard in their region?
NEWS
June 7, 2013
Bob Ehrlich's recent column claiming that multiculturalism destroys democracy takes a very Eurocentric view of America ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2). It selectively glosses over some of the ugly things our nation has done on its way to becoming who we are today. The idea that America was built on a foundation of economic and political freedom, regardless of class, economic status or education, is a pleasant fiction, but the reality was quite different. When our country was founded, only white, land-owning males were allowed to vote.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | November 14, 1992
It's good business, not illegal religious discrimination, for Domino's Pizza to refuse to hire a Catonsville man who wouldn't obey the company's grooming rules because he would be excommunicated from his religion if he shaved his beard, the Maryland Human Relations Commission has ruled.Domino's policy against beards doesn't violate the state's laws against religious discrimination because Domino's surveys indicated customers would rather buy their pizza from clean-shaven workers, the commission ruled this week.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | May 20, 2007
The Maryland Commission on Human Relations has ruled that a condominium board's decision to prevent residents from using a rear door as a shortcut to an adjacent synagogue discriminates against a disabled resident. The decision stems from a complaint filed by Sylvan Wolpert, a 90-year-old physically disabled resident of the Imperial Condominium complex in Northwest Baltimore who uses a walker to get around. Wolpert and other Orthodox Jewish residents in the building had previously been able to use a rear fire door in the basement to get to the nearby Bnai Jacob Shaarei Zion Congregation synagogue.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | May 8, 2007
The vote from the Strathmore Tower condominium board was simple: Down with the Sabbath elevator. But what some thought was a straightforward vote has erupted into a religious and racially tinged controversy to others in this majority senior citizen-occupied condominium complex in Upper Park Heights. The supporters - most of whom are Jewish - say the option for a Sabbath elevator wouldn't have cost extra money and would have aided Orthodox Jewish and disabled residents while helping resale prices.
NEWS
By Darren M.Allen | September 15, 1991
No matter how subtle or unintentional, religious discrimination -- here in the land of the free, home of the brave -- still thrives.While it may not always take a very obvious tone -- say, like Ku Klux Klan rallies, skinhead marches or neo-Nazi hate fests -- it still is offensive and insensitive.And you don't really have to look too far to find it.Last Monday, at the start of a City Council meeting in Westminster, Mayor W. Benjamin Brown Jr. led the council and about 40 members of the publicin the pledge of allegiance.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
Attorneys for Anne Arundel County and the Riverdale Baptist Church reached a $3.25 million settlement Thursday in a federal lawsuit claiming that county zoning laws infringed on the church's religious rights. The agreement, reached on the 12th day of lengthy jury trial, clears the way for the church to build a long-planned Baptist school on 57 acres it owns near the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Lothian. It also requires the county to: • Admit that it violated a federal statute preventing the creation of local zoning laws that impose a "substantial burden" on religious freedoms without compelling cause.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
With all the orphaned and abandoned children in need of loving homes, does anyone really believe that serving pork should be a requirement for good foster parenting? Crazy as it sounds, that's apparently the belief of a private company authorized by the state of Maryland to place foster children. And it's so absurd that it's hard to conclude the real motivation is anything but religious bias. The case came to light Wednesday when the American Civil Liberties Union filed a complaint with the Baltimore City Community Relations Commission against a company called Contemporary Family Services, which has a contract with the state to screen foster-parent candidates.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | May 20, 2007
The Maryland Commission on Human Relations has ruled that a condominium board's decision to prevent residents from using a rear door as a shortcut to an adjacent synagogue discriminates against a disabled resident. The decision stems from a complaint filed by Sylvan Wolpert, a 90-year-old physically disabled resident of the Imperial Condominium complex in Northwest Baltimore who uses a walker to get around. Wolpert and other Orthodox Jewish residents in the building had previously been able to use a rear fire door in the basement to get to the nearby Bnai Jacob Shaarei Zion Congregation synagogue.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | May 8, 2007
The vote from the Strathmore Tower condominium board was simple: Down with the Sabbath elevator. But what some thought was a straightforward vote has erupted into a religious and racially tinged controversy to others in this majority senior citizen-occupied condominium complex in Upper Park Heights. The supporters - most of whom are Jewish - say the option for a Sabbath elevator wouldn't have cost extra money and would have aided Orthodox Jewish and disabled residents while helping resale prices.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Mark Mazzetti and Faye Fiore and Mark Mazzetti,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Pentagon investigation of reported harassment by Christian cadets and teachers found that the U.S. Air Force Academy had failed to accommodate people of non-Christian beliefs but had not engaged in "overt religious discrimination," a report released yesterday said. The conclusions by a team from Air Force headquarters acknowledged that religious slurs, jokes and disparaging remarks had been directed at non-Christian cadets. It said Christian professors used their positions as officers and authority figures to promote their faith.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 26, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dillard's Inc.'s dismissal of a department store employee because she missed work to go on a religious pilgrimage was not religious discrimination, a federal appeals court has ruled.The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court decision that Dillard's, a 250-store chain, owed Mary Tiano more than $16,000 in back wages for refusing to restore her job when she returned from a pilgrimage to the former Yugoslavia.The three-judge panel in San Francisco ruled that Tiano, a Roman Catholic, couldn't prove religious bias because she didn't show that the timing of the pilgrimage was part of a religious calling rather than a personal preference.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
With all the orphaned and abandoned children in need of loving homes, does anyone really believe that serving pork should be a requirement for good foster parenting? Crazy as it sounds, that's apparently the belief of a private company authorized by the state of Maryland to place foster children. And it's so absurd that it's hard to conclude the real motivation is anything but religious bias. The case came to light Wednesday when the American Civil Liberties Union filed a complaint with the Baltimore City Community Relations Commission against a company called Contemporary Family Services, which has a contract with the state to screen foster-parent candidates.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
Attorneys for Anne Arundel County and the Riverdale Baptist Church reached a $3.25 million settlement Thursday in a federal lawsuit claiming that county zoning laws infringed on the church's religious rights. The agreement, reached on the 12th day of lengthy jury trial, clears the way for the church to build a long-planned Baptist school on 57 acres it owns near the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Lothian. It also requires the county to: • Admit that it violated a federal statute preventing the creation of local zoning laws that impose a "substantial burden" on religious freedoms without compelling cause.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | November 14, 1992
It's good business, not illegal religious discrimination, for Domino's Pizza to refuse to hire a Catonsville man who wouldn't obey the company's grooming rules because he would be excommunicated from his religion if he shaved his beard, the Maryland Human Relations Commission has ruled.Domino's policy against beards doesn't violate the state's laws against religious discrimination because Domino's surveys indicated customers would rather buy their pizza from clean-shaven workers, the commission ruled this week.
NEWS
By Darren M.Allen | September 15, 1991
No matter how subtle or unintentional, religious discrimination -- here in the land of the free, home of the brave -- still thrives.While it may not always take a very obvious tone -- say, like Ku Klux Klan rallies, skinhead marches or neo-Nazi hate fests -- it still is offensive and insensitive.And you don't really have to look too far to find it.Last Monday, at the start of a City Council meeting in Westminster, Mayor W. Benjamin Brown Jr. led the council and about 40 members of the publicin the pledge of allegiance.
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