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August 15, 1996
According to Mary Emmerling, author of "New Country Collecting," one of the most important American collectibles as the 20th century draws to a close is the religious art of the Southwest, known as santero village art. (Santeros were the native religious artists of New Mexico.) These are some of the artifacts to look for:Angelito: a painting or carving of an angel, sometimes no more than face and wings.Bulto: a decorated statue of a saint carved out of cottonwood.Cristo: a life-sized carving of the crucified Christ.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Demetrius James Dukas, a world-renowned Byzantine iconographer who decorated churches with mosaics and paintings in the United States and abroad, died June 17 from complications of an infection at his home in Bowie. He was 83. The son of Greek immigrant parents, Mr. Dukas was born and raised in Lynn, Mass., where he graduated in 1947 from Lynn English High School. His artistic talents became evident early, and he began drawing portraits when he was 9 years old. "He had a keen interest in Byzantine art and was drawn to icons because he felt they were used to help people with prayer and reflection," said a niece, Melanie Dukas of Saugus, Mass.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | August 22, 1991
RELIGIOUS art can be as bloody as an R-rated slasher movie.Those with memories of a Roman Catholic childhood need only recall the holy card images of blood gushing from the sacred heart of Jesus. Even those Christians who are less bloody literal in their artistic representations still meditate upon severe images in which the suffering and crucifixion of Jesus Christ are essential for our salvation.For a bracing reminder of this salvation-through-suffering theology, have a somber look at the exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Gallery: "Images of Penance, Images of Mercy: Santos and Ceremonies of the Hispanic Southwest (1860-1910)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 23, 2011
Demetrius James Dukas, a world-renowned Byzantine iconographer who decorated churches with mosaics and paintings throughout the United States and abroad, died June 17 from complications of an infection at his home in Bowie. He was 83. The son of Greek immigrant parents, Mr. Dukas was born and raised in Lynn, Mass., where he graduated in 1947 from Lynn English High School. His artistic talents began early, and when he was 9-years-old, he began drawing portraits. "He had a keen interest in Byzantine art and was drawn to icons because he felt they were used to help people with prayer and reflection," said a niece, Melanie Dukas of Saugus, Mass.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 19, 1991
Not since the 1988 Anselm Kiefer show in Philadelphia has this reviewer been so knocked over by an exhibit of contemporary art as by "Mike and Doug Starn," now at the Baltimore Museum of Art through April 21.The Starns are entirely correct when they say their photographic constructions are modernist in having a duality of emphasis in which form is as important as content. By printing their photographs on torn, taped, bent, glued paper or film, by exhibiting them in broken frames behind multiple pieces of glass, by holding their images together with clamps or leaning them against the wall instead of hanging them, the Starns have changed the nature and the perception of the art of photography.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
The funky and quite expensive decorative bird house ischarming -- and just happens to be in the shape of a church.You could hardly call it a design trend in itself, but consider this:Three new books on feng shui (the ancient Chinese art of improving one's spiritual as well as physical environment with interior design) have just come out. A decade ago most American interior decorators would have laughed. Now one of the country's most influential designers, Clodagh, has a feng shui consultant on staff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | January 17, 1999
NEW YORK -- Andy Warhol captured the 1960s in all its giddy heights of narcissism, exhibitionism and consumerism -- an artistic quest that made an indelible impression on popular culture and brought him celebrity and wealth. Now, nearly a dozen years after his death, Warhol's little-known spiritual side has emerged from an under-explored body of the pop artist's works.A pious Catholic, Warhol produced more than 100 drawings, prints and paintings with religious themes. Among them are a monumental series of at least 40 paintings inspired by the familiar "Last Supper" of Leonardo da Vinci that Berkeley art historian Jane Daggett Dillenberger describes as the largest series of religious art by a major American artist.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Demetrius James Dukas, a world-renowned Byzantine iconographer who decorated churches with mosaics and paintings in the United States and abroad, died June 17 from complications of an infection at his home in Bowie. He was 83. The son of Greek immigrant parents, Mr. Dukas was born and raised in Lynn, Mass., where he graduated in 1947 from Lynn English High School. His artistic talents became evident early, and he began drawing portraits when he was 9 years old. "He had a keen interest in Byzantine art and was drawn to icons because he felt they were used to help people with prayer and reflection," said a niece, Melanie Dukas of Saugus, Mass.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 23, 2011
Demetrius James Dukas, a world-renowned Byzantine iconographer who decorated churches with mosaics and paintings throughout the United States and abroad, died June 17 from complications of an infection at his home in Bowie. He was 83. The son of Greek immigrant parents, Mr. Dukas was born and raised in Lynn, Mass., where he graduated in 1947 from Lynn English High School. His artistic talents began early, and when he was 9-years-old, he began drawing portraits. "He had a keen interest in Byzantine art and was drawn to icons because he felt they were used to help people with prayer and reflection," said a niece, Melanie Dukas of Saugus, Mass.
TRAVEL
October 17, 2010
"Cyprus: Crossroads of Civilizations" exhibit What: A new exhibition featuring hundreds of artifacts from Cyprus on view for the first time in the United States. "Cyprus: Crossroads of Civilizations" marks the 50th anniversary of the independence of the Republic of Cyprus and showcases more than 200 artifacts that range from items from the earliest villages to medieval religious art and give an overview of the island's 11,000-year history. Among the objects on display for the first time in the United States are gold jewelry dating to 750 to 480 B.C.; vases, bowls and sculptures from the Hellenistic (325 to 50 B.C.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | January 17, 1999
NEW YORK -- Andy Warhol captured the 1960s in all its giddy heights of narcissism, exhibitionism and consumerism -- an artistic quest that made an indelible impression on popular culture and brought him celebrity and wealth. Now, nearly a dozen years after his death, Warhol's little-known spiritual side has emerged from an under-explored body of the pop artist's works.A pious Catholic, Warhol produced more than 100 drawings, prints and paintings with religious themes. Among them are a monumental series of at least 40 paintings inspired by the familiar "Last Supper" of Leonardo da Vinci that Berkeley art historian Jane Daggett Dillenberger describes as the largest series of religious art by a major American artist.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
The funky and quite expensive decorative bird house ischarming -- and just happens to be in the shape of a church.You could hardly call it a design trend in itself, but consider this:Three new books on feng shui (the ancient Chinese art of improving one's spiritual as well as physical environment with interior design) have just come out. A decade ago most American interior decorators would have laughed. Now one of the country's most influential designers, Clodagh, has a feng shui consultant on staff.
NEWS
August 15, 1996
According to Mary Emmerling, author of "New Country Collecting," one of the most important American collectibles as the 20th century draws to a close is the religious art of the Southwest, known as santero village art. (Santeros were the native religious artists of New Mexico.) These are some of the artifacts to look for:Angelito: a painting or carving of an angel, sometimes no more than face and wings.Bulto: a decorated statue of a saint carved out of cottonwood.Cristo: a life-sized carving of the crucified Christ.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | August 22, 1991
RELIGIOUS art can be as bloody as an R-rated slasher movie.Those with memories of a Roman Catholic childhood need only recall the holy card images of blood gushing from the sacred heart of Jesus. Even those Christians who are less bloody literal in their artistic representations still meditate upon severe images in which the suffering and crucifixion of Jesus Christ are essential for our salvation.For a bracing reminder of this salvation-through-suffering theology, have a somber look at the exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Gallery: "Images of Penance, Images of Mercy: Santos and Ceremonies of the Hispanic Southwest (1860-1910)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 19, 1991
Not since the 1988 Anselm Kiefer show in Philadelphia has this reviewer been so knocked over by an exhibit of contemporary art as by "Mike and Doug Starn," now at the Baltimore Museum of Art through April 21.The Starns are entirely correct when they say their photographic constructions are modernist in having a duality of emphasis in which form is as important as content. By printing their photographs on torn, taped, bent, glued paper or film, by exhibiting them in broken frames behind multiple pieces of glass, by holding their images together with clamps or leaning them against the wall instead of hanging them, the Starns have changed the nature and the perception of the art of photography.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | February 24, 2002
Luna Paris is the creative persona of Lauren Unger, an American performance artist and painter living in Paris whose abstract-figurative canvases, on view at Gomez Gallery through March 15, address issues of the body. Unger describes her work as allegory, though in works like Radiation any one-to-one correspondence between image and meaning seems far too restrictive; these works are pictorial mysteries that suggest far more ample readings. Also at Gomez are Argentine artist Sergio Roggerone's paintings inspired by Renaissance icons and the religious folk art of his native country.
NEWS
August 16, 1996
THE WALTERS ART GALLERY has made a substantial advance in the acquisition of 17 works of Ethiopian Christian art, most of which are now on public view. This complements its holdings in Armenian, Russian, Greek and early Italian Christian devotional art.This addition to the collection flows naturally from the Walters' xTC stunning introduction of Ethiopian religious art to Americans in its 1993 show, which fed its own interest and reputation, indirectly leading to this purchase and extended loan.
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