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By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Staff Writer | December 12, 1992
GAILALASSI, Somalia -- Operation Restore Hope had a tragic consequence here yesterday, just as it has elsewhere in the hinterlands of starvation.Gunmen fleeing the U.S.-led occupation in Mogadishu, came through and looted and pillaged the village Thursday night, taking the food and fuel and medicine. Four relief workers, terrified for their lives in what had been a "pretty peaceful" village, were rescued by a German air force cargo airplane that waited only four minutes on a desolate runway.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
Robert W. "Bob" Roche, a former Peace Corps volunteer who later worked in Africa with Catholic Relief Services, died Jan. 12 of undetermined causes at Sanctuary at Holy Cross, a Burtonsville senior living community. The Columbia resident was 61. "We are awaiting the results of an autopsy as to the cause of death," said his son, Robert L. Roche, who lives in Washington. Robert Winslow "Bob" Roche was born and raised in Monroeville, Pa., where he graduated in 1968 from Gateway Senior High School.
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NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
When Paige Wilhite left for Angola in July, she went to help feed hungry people in the war-torn city of Huambo. But when she was evacuated last week, she came out as a victim."
NEWS
July 31, 2011
The world has been slow to react to the growing specter of famine in Somalia, despite repeated warnings by the United Nations and aid organizations that millions of people are at risk. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has said that nearly 4 million Somalis - half the country's population - were in imminent danger of starvation. Unless the international community takes immediate steps to address the crisis, the loss of life there could rival that of the humanitarian emergencies in Sudan in 1998, Ethiopia in 2001 and Niger in 2005.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 1999
KUKES, Albania -- Heavy rain pelted refugees crossing into Albania and Macedonia throughout the morning yesterday, and blasting winds ripped the plastic sheeting many tried to use as shields, as the swell of exiles continued under a protracted Serbian campaign of "ethnic cleansing."In Albania, international relief agencies struggled vainly to keep up with the growing numbers of people and vehicles, as the day's intake of refugees neared 20,000. Fewer than 3,000 refugees entered Macedonia at two border crossings by nightfall yesterday, compared with more than 12,000 who entered from Kosovo on Thursday and Friday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 6, 1992
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- In the tension-filled days before the arrival of U.S. troops, relief workers fear that gunmen may rush to loot supplies or even resort to kidnappings before the Americans step ashore.That has prompted the aid workers to bunker down, stock extra food and water, and tighten their security precautions.As always, their safety depends largely on the protection of hired Somalian guards who follow them in heavily armed vehicles to prevent gunmen from killing them or taking supplies.
NEWS
May 8, 2008
The longer the military government of Myanmar waits to allow relief agencies into the cyclone-ravaged country, the higher the death toll among its impoverished and homeless people will be. The weekend storm already may have killed 70,000, and international relief experts say the toll could rise to 100,000 without prompt aid. The generals running the isolated Southeast Asian country were neither prepared for Tropical Cyclone Nargis nor equipped to handle...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 7, 1992
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- In some of Somalia's more remote towns, the sight of a white person is such a novelty that many Western visitors can expect to be thronged by curious, giggling children who leap to touch their oddly textured hair and their strange, pale skin.Mogadishu, the capital, is accustomed to contact with the outside world. But there are sneers and winks among some Somalis about what goes on behind the high-walled compounds of the foreign relief agencies, where single men and women sleep under the same roof without chaperones and consume alcoholic beverages.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - When troops from the Army's 3rd Infantry Division rolled into Saddam Hussein International Airport over the weekend, they captured more than a few runways and buildings. In the short term, it was a key psychological victory over Hussein's regime, showing that U.S. troops could march to its front door and kick it in. In the longer term, the airport stands to play an important strategic role for U.S.-led forces - allowing fresh troops to be ferried in and serving as a base for warplanes and attack helicopters - as well as enabling humanitarian aid and relief workers to be brought in, Pentagon officials and defense analysts said.
NEWS
February 22, 1994
Last night, U.N. Maj. Rob Annink said all Serb heavy weapon sites had been visited and either brought under U.N. control or had the weapons withdrawn.Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic said in Pale that his forces would only use their withdrawn weapons for self-defense, not employ them against other towns.NATO warplanes flew over Sarajevo on reconnaissance missions, providing audible warning of what could still happen.Today in Bonn, Germany, officials from the United States, United Nations, Europe and Russia will work on next steps in Bosnia.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | January 30, 2010
Donations for Haiti have poured in to the American Red Cross of Central Maryland from a range of sources. Nothing, though, has stood out like the coins and crumpled dollar bills that spilled from one envelope. That gift - $14.64 - came from the pockets of homeless people at a downtown Baltimore shelter. "We were all weepy-eyed," recalled Red Cross volunteer coordinator Bobbie Jones, who was at the front desk when the donation arrived. Public relations director Linnea Anderson got teary, too. "Just the thought of those people huddled together in a shelter and seeing a need beyond themselves is enough to give anybody chills," she said.
NEWS
January 29, 2010
Could you imagine a country so cruel and intolerant that it would deport undocumented immigrants from Haiti to their island home in the wake of the devastation there? President Obama's recent decision to grant temporary protected status (TPS) to Haitians ensured that the U.S. is not such a place. The widespread death and destruction in Haiti has clearly struck a chord in Americans' hearts. Last weekend's celebrity-filled telethon raised $57 million, and total U.S. giving has already exceeded an unprecedented $569 million as of Thursday thanks in no small measure to both wall-to-wall television coverage and Web sites, text messages and other advances of modern telecommunications.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Josh Mitchell and Tanika White and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporters | May 10, 2008
As Myanmar's military government has thwarted international efforts to deliver aid to thousands of people affected by last week's cyclone, Baltimore-based organizations are raising money to help victims and waiting to see if partner organizations will be able to gain entry into the devastated country. The political hindrance "adds a level of frustration" for aid workers, said Paul Rebman, director of disaster response for Baltimore-based World Relief. The aid group has partnered with five other organizations, two of which already had staff on the ground in Myanmar - a fact that helped to ease their assistance efforts, Rebman said.
NEWS
May 8, 2008
The longer the military government of Myanmar waits to allow relief agencies into the cyclone-ravaged country, the higher the death toll among its impoverished and homeless people will be. The weekend storm already may have killed 70,000, and international relief experts say the toll could rise to 100,000 without prompt aid. The generals running the isolated Southeast Asian country were neither prepared for Tropical Cyclone Nargis nor equipped to handle...
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | May 19, 2007
As they traveled from one Capitol Hill office to the next, Tom Garofalo and his colleagues from Catholic Relief Services made their pitch: Humanitarian aid to impoverished Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza must feed more than hungry bodies. It must nourish minds and spirits if peace is the goal, and classrooms would be a logical place to start. But at the mention of schools, one congressional staffer stopped them: We can't do that; the Palestinian government teaches hate. It's a reaction that relief workers have faced as they try to do their jobs without running afoul of U.S. policy that prohibits assistance to the Palestinian Authority.
NEWS
November 3, 2005
It's easy to forget the children of the Allai Valley. They live in a part of the world that many of us couldn't find on a map. A ferocious earthquake flattened their remote, mountainous villages in northwest Pakistan. Survivors of the Oct. 8 quake that killed more than 73,000 people - nearly half were children - are among the 1.9 million victims who lack the basics to survive, specifically food and shelter. Couple that grim statistic with the disparity in emergency aid pledged for the relief effort and actual dollars in hand and you have a post-quake calamity in the making as the Himalayan winter approaches.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2002
AS A sign language interpreter at Bollman Bridge Elementary School, Connie Merrick serves as a bridge between hearing-impaired pupils and the hearing world. Of late, she bridges another gap - between local pupils and relief workers in New York City. Last week, Merrick took student artwork and messages to relief workers on her seventh trip to the World Trade Center site since the terrorist attacks Sept. 11. During most of those visits, she volunteered at St. Paul's chapel, an Episcopal church across the street from the disaster site that has been altered to serve as a refuge for tired and hungry relief workers.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Staff Writer Richard O'Mara, Sun staff writer in Mogadishu, and Peter Honey of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | December 13, 1992
BARDERA, Somalia -- The U.S. military decision to secur Mogadishu before troops occupy outposts in the hinterlands of starvation has made life more dangerous for people trying to feed dying Somalis.Marauding gunmen fleeing the capital, where U.S. Marines landed Wednesday, are running amok across the countryside and even in refugee camps in neighboring Kenya, putting the safety of Western relief workers and innocent Somalis at risk.In Bardera, relief workers are concerned that the next stage of the operation, taking control of Baidoa, will make matters worse for them here.
NEWS
By CAROL J. WILLIAMS and CAROL J. WILLIAMS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2005
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Three powerful aftershocks of the Oct. 8 earthquake triggered fresh landslides and panic across stricken northern Pakistan yesterday as relief workers warned that thousands more deaths from disease and exposure could occur among the 500,000 still stranded in mountain villages. The new setbacks in getting aid to cold and injured survivors dampened spirits in the hardest-hit areas where a day earlier President Pervez Musharraf proposed opening the divided Kashmir to allow family contacts and better aid flows.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - Toddlers stacked building blocks into towers. Five- and 6-year-olds played board games, paged through storybooks and chased one another in circles. Teenage girls in headscarves and skirts sat cross-legged side by side, whispering in each other's ears and giggling. These might be scenes from children playing almost anywhere in the world. But here, where the violent shaking of the earth and a giant wave made it seem that the world was about to come to an end, the sights and sounds of children's play and laughter this week were nothing short of remarkable, as refreshing and rare for residents as a cool breeze in this steamy city at the northern tip of Sumatra island.
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