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Relief Effort

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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
The region's Red Cross chapter says the union representing 50 employees involved in blood drive operations has threatened to strike next Friday if a new contract is not reached. Teamsters Local 311 sent a letter of intent to the Greater Chesapeake and Potomac Blood Services Region warning of a work stoppage, an action the nonprofit agency labeled "irresponsible" and a potential disruption to blood collection operations to aid areas ravaged by Superstorm Sandy. The local, chartered in 1952 and headquartered in Baltimore, did not return requests for comment.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Jo-Ann de Belen, who works for Baltimore-based nonprofit World Relief, was recently mobilized to the Philippines to coordinate relief efforts after Typhoon Haiyan ravaged the region and left thousands dead. Though she has worked in crisis situations since joining the organization in 2009, the devastation left by the storm has affected her. Belen, who is Filipino, volunteered to be the sole World Relief representative stationed in the Philippines in part because she was motivated to help her native country.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | October 4, 1993
Their immediate relatives have been spared the tragedy.But a kinship with those suffering from the Maharashtra earthquake -- which has killed at least 30,000 people since striking a rural area of India early Thursday morning -- led 13 Baltimore-area Indian organizations to begin planning a relief effort yesterday."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
With filming for Season 2 completed last week, members of the team making "House of Cards" in Baltimore are focusing their energies on helping the victims of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Through Wednesday, workers on the show will be loading donated goods onto a tractor trailer that will be driven to Los Angeles and shipped to the Philippines, according to Rehya Young, assistant locations manager for the Netflix series produced by Media Rights Capital. "We'll be accepting donations until Wednesday, Nov. 20, which will give us time to pack the truck properly and get it to L.A. on time," said Young.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
Keith Hutchison, an Army water-purification specialist operating mainly in Third World countries, is hardened to scenes of disease and death. But, he confessed, nothing can prepare him for what he expects to face soon in packed Rwandan refugee camps in Zaire.On Sunday, just days after he returned from a 10-day mission in South Korea, a call came to his home in Panama asking him to prepare for a six-month stint helping to overcome sickness and death brought on by civil war in Rwanda.By 2 a.m. yesterday, he had arrived at Aberdeen Proving Ground northeast of Baltimore, which this week began preparing Army support personnel to aid in the growing relief effort.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
Carroll County has sent its emergency management coordinator to Louisiana to help out for a week in response to a plea for administrators in the hurricane-ravaged area. The county commissioners also will lend a portable emergency generator to the relief effort indefinitely. William E. Martin left Friday morning, said Vivian D. Laxton, county spokeswoman. He is to return Sept. 19 from Louisiana, where he expects to serve as an administrator in an emergency management center in Jefferson Parish.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 15, 1991
DIYARBAKIR, Turkey -- In what appeared to be the start of a massive U.S. effort to take the lead in relief operations for the refugees of northern Iraq, three U.S. warships brought transport helicopters and 3,000 Marines to the Turkish port of Iskendurun yesterday amid plans to build a logistical supply base in southern Turkey and relief centers in the mountainous border region with Iraq.U.S. Army Col. Don Kirchoffner, director of the Combined Information Bureau at the Incirlik air base, said the U.S. forces would organize the operation to culminate in feeding 700,000 mostly Kurdish refugees one meal a day, through helicopter drops and direct food deliveries.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE and ROBERT LEE,Staff writer | October 23, 1990
It's been four months since a freak storm wiped out a sleepy Ohio hollow 300 miles west of here. Wayne Ridenour still can't shake the idea that it's his personal mission to help them pick up the pieces."
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - Recovering from Hurricane Katrina "will take years," President Bush said yesterday as federal officials planned a major relief effort and emergency agencies raced to provide food, shelter, water and medical treatment to victims of what he called "one of the worst natural disasters in our nation's history." "This is going to be a difficult road. The challenges that we face on the ground are unprecedented," Bush told reporters in the White House Rose Garden, flanked by Cabinet officials he summoned to an afternoon meeting to plan the relief effort.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2005
Moved by the images of destruction and despair in the Gulf Coast states hit by Hurricane Katrina, Americans are contributing money to relief efforts at a record rate - far surpassing even the outpouring that followed 9/11. Josh Kittner, a spokesman for the American Red Cross, said yesterday that since Katrina touched shore in Florida nine days before, businesses and individuals have given the relief agency $203.8 million through its Web site and 800 number. At the same point after the terrorist attacks in 2001, Kittner said, the Red Cross had raised $24.8 million through those channels.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE RECORD | November 8, 2012
There were plenty of reasons to complain about Sandy, but plenty of people in Harford County ignored them and have been offering help to people hit harder by the so-called superstorm. Born as a tropical cyclone, Sandy merged with a north Atlantic storm of similar frightening power, a nor'easter. The story of devastation visited upon New England's commercial fishing communities by a similar convergence of bad weather in 1991 was detailed in Sebastian Junger's book, "The Perfect Storm.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
The region's Red Cross chapter says the union representing 50 employees involved in blood drive operations has threatened to strike next Friday if a new contract is not reached. Teamsters Local 311 sent a letter of intent to the Greater Chesapeake and Potomac Blood Services Region warning of a work stoppage, an action the nonprofit agency labeled "irresponsible" and a potential disruption to blood collection operations to aid areas ravaged by Superstorm Sandy. The local, chartered in 1952 and headquartered in Baltimore, did not return requests for comment.
EXPLORE
June 17, 2011
The Aberdeen IronBirds began their 2011 campaign on the right foot, beating the visiting Hudson Valley Renegades 7-2 in their season-opening matchup Friday night. The hosts were helped by 19-year-old flame thrower Parker Bridwell, who made the start and worked through five full innings. During his opening-night stint, Bridwell (1-0) sent nine Renegades down on strikes without allowing any walks and held Hudson Valley to a paltry four hits in the win. "I felt good on the mound, and I'm glad we got this first win under our belt," Bridwell said after the game.
SPORTS
By George Diaz | May 4, 2011
NASCAR Nation remained relatively unscathed in the wake of the devastating storms that rocked Alabama and surrounding areas. There was a bit of minor damage at Atlanta Motor Speedway. Nothing much worth noting at Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega, Ala., which was fortunate to have escaped the wrath of nature twice in the span of a few weeks. Nationwide Series driver Eric McClure got the worst of it. He survived what he describes as the "most helpless and scary" moment of his life when a tornado tore through his home in Abingdon, Va. "It looks like a war zone, a minefield," McClure told reporters.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
The catastrophic earthquake and tsunami in Japan closed schools, interrupted communications and canceled most travel plans, but teachers and parents at Seijo Exchange Gakuen High School in Tokyo decided to continue a longstanding tradition with a Maryland school. Amid aftershocks and threats of radiation on their country's northeastern coast, they put aside fears and allowed eight students to make the annual two-week trip to McDonogh School in Owings Mills. "Our principal thought it important that now is the time when Japanese people should go abroad and tell the world about the suffering Japan is now experiencing," Katsumi Ichikawa, a teacher wrote to Dave Harley, a McDonogh history teacher.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
Haitian folk artists have long fashioned sequins, beads and recycled cloth backings into ornate, colorful flags depicting island deities. Said to offer protection to those who display them, the flags have been working overtime here in Baltimore since the catastrophic earthquake Jan. 12 - offering protection in a way that says as much about local generosity as the flags' spiritual powers. Since the earthquake struck, Sideshow, the gift shop at the American Visionary Art Museum, has raised some $15,000 through sales of the ceremonial flags and other pieces of Haitian folk art. Operator Ted Frankel, who makes two or three trips a year to Haiti in search of material for the shop, has been sending all proceeds back to the Caribbean nation and the artists themselves.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Don Lee and Paul Richter and Don Lee,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 7, 2005
JAKARTA, Indonesia - The United Nations' role in the massive Asian tsunami relief effort was broadened yesterday at an international conference where world leaders also announced a new round of aid pledges. Early today, the death toll from the devastating earthquake and tsunamis that hit Asia and Africa soared to about 160,000 after Indonesia announced almost 20,000 new deaths. Health officials have warned that the death toll could jump even higher without a continual supply of aid, and world leaders struggled yesterday to figure out the best way to help victims - and to prevent such a catastrophe from happening again.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
Inspired by the enthusiasm of a woman who has reaped the benefits of her community's kindness, Carroll County residents and businesses have donated tons of items to the Hurricane Katrina relief effort. Seven tractor-trailers are bound for Louisiana and Texas with clothing, linens, medication, food, furniture and bedding. One is pulling a fully equipped camper that can sleep eight - also a donation. Rosalind Blakey, who resides in Westminster with her two children in Carroll's first Habitat for Humanity home built last year, started the drive for relief supplies about two weeks ago. The campaign quickly outgrew a spot on a shopping center parking lot and moved to the Carroll County Agriculture Center, where dozens of volunteers sorted, packed and labeled the donations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 25, 2010
Haitian folk artists have long fashioned sequins, beads and recycled cloth backings into ornate, colorful flags depicting island deities. Said to offer protection to those who display them, the flags have been working overtime here in Baltimore since the catastrophic earthquake Jan. 12 - offering protection in a way that says as much about local generosity as the flags' spiritual powers. Since the earthquake struck, Sideshow, the gift shop at the American Visionary Art Museum, has raised some $15,000 through sales of the ceremonial flags and other pieces of Haitian folk art. Operator Ted Frankel, who makes two or three trips a year to Haiti in search of material for the shop, has been sending all proceeds back to the Caribbean nation and the artists themselves.
FEATURES
By Matthew Hay Brown | matthew.brown@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
The Revs. Tracy Bruce and Stephen Davenport travel to Haiti every January to visit the music school in Port-au-Prince, the church in St. Etienne and the other development projects they support in the poorest nation in the Americas. But with the school and the church now destroyed, and no word yet from many of the friends with whom the husband-and-wife Episcopal clergy members have worked over the decades, they expect this month's trip to be different. "There's nothing that's coming out of Haiti at all in terms of communication right now from anybody on the ground," Bruce, rector of St. John's Episcopal Church in Glyndon, said Friday.
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