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By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | March 2, 2010
Locally based relief agencies are weighing what they might do to help victims of the earthquake in Chile, but said Monday that they had no plans to shift their principal focus from long-term recovery efforts in Haiti. While the 8.8-magnitude quake that struck Chile early Saturday was stronger than the one that rocked Haiti in January, Lutheran World Relief's Hayley Hontos said, the South American nation is unlikely to require nearly as much support. "Chile is Latin America's most developed country and they're highly capable of dealing with a situation like this," said Hontos, special projects coordinator for the Baltimore-based agency.
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NEWS
November 20, 2012
In the first two weeks after Hurricane Sandy battered the Mid-Atlantic region, leaving millions without power, relief agencies provided an estimated 4.9 million meals to the victims - the equivalent of 150 tractor-trailer loads of food. That was a Herculean task for which those workers should be congratulated, but it was also a drop in the proverbial bucket. Had Sandy never hit the region, there would still be hunger of shocking proportions. In Maryland alone, the latest estimates are that at least 460,000 people are "food insecure," meaning they are not certain to have adequate nutrition on a day-to-day basis.
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NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | May 30, 2006
As the death toll from a weekend earthquake in central Indonesia topped 5,000 yesterday, local relief agencies began dispatching people, resources and money to the devastated central Java island. The 6.3-magnitude earthquake, which struck the densely populated area early Saturday, also left thousands injured and hundreds of thousands homeless. Catholic Relief Services, based in Baltimore, is part of a $1.2 million response with the Caritas network and other Catholic agencies to help the region respond to immediate health concerns and long-term housing needs, the organization announced yesterday.
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By Bob Allen | October 13, 2011
The Least of These Ministries, a faith-based, nondenominational relief organization founded by Manchester resident Steve Hull and his wife, shipped 200,000 meal packages to undernourished Haitian sugar cane workers this week. On the morning of Oct. 10, the organization took possession of the food packages from another group, Feed My Starving Children, after pledging to transport the food to Haitians living in work camps in the Dominican Republic. The shipment was passed along later this week.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
From helpful to unusable, U.S. donations for refugees expelled from Kosovo are flooding relief agencies at a record pace, nine weeks after NATO bombs began to rain on Yugoslavia.Coming so quickly after Hurricane Mitch devastated Central America in October, the response to the Balkan crisis has heartened agencies worried about donor fatigue.At the same time, relief workers laboring in other parts of the world -- and on social issues here -- are shaking their heads at the selectivity of the media's focus and donors' attention.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2002
In 1995, a small humanitarian aid group from Baltimore called International Orthodox Christian Charities had big plans - to build a self-sustaining economy for refugees in the war-torn region around Chechnya. Two years later, the group did a painful about-face. Reeling from the kidnapping of two staff members who were held captive months before being released, it pulled out of the region altogether, acknowledging the danger that other foreign agencies already had fled. Today, IOCC officials say they have grown stronger and smarter from that crisis, evolving from a fledgling group of concerned leaders in Orthodox Christian churches to a $35 million operation with programs in 11 countries.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In the hardest line taken yet by government and international relief agencies to the outpouring from the public in a crisis, officials are accepting only monetary donations for Kosovar assistance after a series of troubled relief efforts that left workers overwhelmed with inappropriate contributions."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
Warning that more than 30 million Africans are at risk of starvation from worsening food shortages on that continent, international relief organizations called yesterday for an emergency increase in aid to prevent what they termed a looming humanitarian disaster. Meeting in Baltimore, officials of the United Nations, U.S. government and 15 relief agencies pledged themselves to greater efforts to prevent a catastrophic famine -- but they remained far apart on how much food and money that will take.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 1997
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast -- With evacuation efforts paralyzed for thousands of sick and starving Rwandan Hutu refugees stranded in central Zaire, United Nations officials are accusing Zaire's rebel movement of deliberately impeding emergency relief operations aimed at helping them.International relief agencies say there is evidence of a drive by the Zairian insurgents to kill off thousands of Rwandan Hutu refugees.In an unusually blunt criticism Monday, the head of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, Sadako Ogata, accused the Zairian rebellion led by Laurent Kabila of manufacturing pretenses to deny relief workers access to as many as 100,000 of the desperate Hutus who are located in the region of Kisangani and of preventing the operation of an airlift to transport them home.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
The silence on the fourth floor of this nondescript brick building on West Fayette Street belies reality. It is close to 4 p.m. on the day before a holiday weekend. But beneath the surface, big things are happening here at the world headquarters of Catholic Relief Services, between cubicles and offices, through the static of phone calls and the strokes of furiously typed e-mails. At CRS yesterday, a tired-looking president and chief executive Ken Hackett is on the elevator up, about to recognize two employees with certificates for their tireless work this week.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Waves of refugees arrive daily to Kenya, some having walked weeks through unforgiving desert with virtually no possessions, and yet local relief workers report optimism among the millions threatened by the historic famine and drought spreading through the Horn of Africa. "Everyone looks hungry and wiped out," said Bruce White, a Catholic Relief Services adviser who returned earlier this month from Kenya. "But there is a sense of hope because there is help. I asked one man what he wanted here and he said 'peace.'" Jonathan Ernst, a Baltimore freelance photojournalist, reached the refugee camps in eastern Kenya last week and is reporting to Lutheran World Relief.
NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | March 2, 2010
Locally based relief agencies are weighing what they might do to help victims of the earthquake in Chile, but said Monday that they had no plans to shift their principal focus from long-term recovery efforts in Haiti. While the 8.8-magnitude quake that struck Chile early Saturday was stronger than the one that rocked Haiti in January, Lutheran World Relief's Hayley Hontos said, the South American nation is unlikely to require nearly as much support. "Chile is Latin America's most developed country and they're highly capable of dealing with a situation like this," said Hontos, special projects coordinator for the Baltimore-based agency.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, Joseph Burris and Mary Gail Hare and Matthew Hay Brown, Joseph Burris and Mary Gail Hare,matthew.brown@baltsun.com, Joseph.Burris@baltsun.com and Mary.Gail.Hare@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Rescue workers searched frantically Wednesday for survivors of the worst earthquake to strike Haiti in more than two centuries, while officials warned that the death toll could reach well over 100,000. Haitians piled bodies in the streets of Port-au-Prince as they dug through the rubble for neighbors, friends or loved ones missing since Tuesday afternoon, when the 7.0-magnitude quake struck near the capital of the Caribbean nation of 9 million. As the United States prepared to send ships, helicopters, transport planes and a 2,000-member Marine unit, and governments and aid groups sent water, biscuits and tons of emergency medical supplies, Baltimore's relief community joined in the huge international relief effort.
NEWS
May 15, 2008
Myanmar's ruling junta has sacrificed the lives of its people to selfishly protect its secretive, repressive government. Human life means little to the generals in power, and their restrictions on food, shelter, water and other relief aid for cyclone victims is ample proof of that. Their indifference to the critical needs of survivors will consign so many more of them to death. Myanmar's rulers need only look to its neighbor to see that a military response to a natural disaster is foremost about saving lives, not safeguarding the regime.
NEWS
By Stewart Patrick | May 15, 2008
For nearly two weeks, we have witnessed the callous indifference of Myanmar's ruling junta to the victims of Cyclone Nargis. The regime's grotesque failure to permit more than a trickle of aid has stimulated calls for the United Nations to compel Myanmar to provide access for international relief efforts. Whether such calls are answered could determine the survival of hundreds of thousands in Myanmar spared from the initial inundation but clinging to life without food, clean water, shelter and access to lifesaving medicines.
NEWS
May 8, 2008
The longer the military government of Myanmar waits to allow relief agencies into the cyclone-ravaged country, the higher the death toll among its impoverished and homeless people will be. The weekend storm already may have killed 70,000, and international relief experts say the toll could rise to 100,000 without prompt aid. The generals running the isolated Southeast Asian country were neither prepared for Tropical Cyclone Nargis nor equipped to handle...
NEWS
By Lisa Orloff | September 10, 2006
Our nation has just marked the first anniversary of one life-changing event, Hurricane Katrina, and is about to mark the fifth anniversary of another: the 9/11 attacks. We are still healing from both. Although we will never forget the deaths of our citizens and rescue workers, or the physical and emotional destruction these events wreaked upon our country and the world, we do not often examine the experiences of the legions of community volunteers who came out to help during and after these events.
NEWS
August 21, 2007
The United States is the most generous donor of food aid to the world's poor, but most of the help perversely goes to American farmers and shippers. Congressional strings tied to the program mean that only about one-third of the aid reaches its purported targets - and in some cases hurts the people it is intended to help. In a gesture of protest, CARE, the world's leading relief agency, is withdrawing from the program as of 2009, forsaking an estimated $45 million a year. Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, and other groups involved in such aid, should follow CARE's lead.
NEWS
August 21, 2007
The United States is the most generous donor of food aid to the world's poor, but most of the help perversely goes to American farmers and shippers. Congressional strings tied to the program mean that only about one-third of the aid reaches its purported targets - and in some cases hurts the people it is intended to help. In a gesture of protest, CARE, the world's leading relief agency, is withdrawing from the program as of 2009, forsaking an estimated $45 million a year. Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, and other groups involved in such aid, should follow CARE's lead.
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