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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Fourteen years after Mother Teresa's last visit to Baltimore, her blood, her hair and several of her personal effects returned to the city Wednesday. The items, which also include a rosary and sandals worn by the candidate for Catholic sainthood, were displayed for several hours at the hospice for AIDS patients she opened in East Baltimore in 1992. In the chapel at the Gift of Hope hospice on Ashland Avenue, operated by Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, Shirley Sapp paused before the frayed shoes.
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Jacques Kelly | November 22, 2013
A train derailment this week near Pennsylvania Station showed me how confused we are about the Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel, where the mishap occurred. This 1873 work of engineering burrows under West Baltimore neighborhoods for 1.4 miles, but its role in local transportation remains little known. I winced when a radio news reader described its location as "south of Baltimore. " Though many assessments say that this 140-year-old engineering relic needs to be replaced, it has not happened.
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NEWS
By Elisha King and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff | July 29, 1991
Tin fire extinguishers from the early 1900s. Belt buckles from old firemen's uniforms. Antique fire hats.These relics, on display at a flea market yesterday at Festival Hall, serve as a quiet reminder of the past, before fire trucks sold for $400,000 and before firefighters had to learn how to identify toxic chemicals and avoid AIDS infection.Other relics of firefighting days gone by also were displayed at the flea market of firefighter memorabilia, one of the events of the eighth annual Great American Firehouse Exposition and Muster.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Editor's note: This is the first in a series of occasional features on prominent local residents and the possessions they treasure. You can get a pretty good idea of someone's journey through life by looking at the objects with which he surrounds himself. For Gary Vikan, who stepped down this spring as the director of the Walters Art Museum , those objects include a pair of tickets to Woodstock, a piece of the gate guarding Graceland, a collection of Russian icons and a miniature replica of the Shroud of Turin.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 1993
PARIS -- Despite warnings by a Vatican official that it is a sin to trade in relics, two slivers of olive tree said to come from the cross on which Jesus was crucified were sold for more than $18,000 in a crowded auction house here yesterday.Accompanying the bits of wood were two certificates, one dated 1855 from the Vatican apparently authenticating the wood as part of Jesus' cross and the other dated 1856 recording that it was a gift from the patriarch of Jerusalem to Edouard Thouvenel, at the time France's ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, the predecessor of present-day Turkey.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
To understand the appeal of sacred relics, which have caused wars and attracted devout pilgrims for nearly a millennium, look no further than Babe Ruth's bat. Baseball fans in Baltimore forked over $10 last week to hold the Sultan of Swat's 32-ounce club with seven notches on the handle. It was a similar impulse that guided a 12th century German worshipper to encase inside a small gold and silver box some twigs thought to be from the manger where Jesus Christ was born, plus a piece of the cross on which he was crucified.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 15, 1992
HANOI, Vietnam -- Up a musty stairwell in a museu commemorating the triumphs of the People's Army of Vietnam, a team of American investigators sit hunched over laptop computers and a camera tripod, trying to end what for many American families is the continuing torment of the Vietnam War.Every half-hour or so, a group of Vietnamese museum workers slowly make their way up the steps, lugging another assortment of relics collected from the enemy, the United...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
Relics from the wreckage of the Confederacy's most-feared ocean raider, the CSS Alabama, are to be retrieved from France next week by a Navy archaeologist and the chief conservator for the Maryland Historical Trust.The Civil War fighting ship was sunk by the Union steamer USS Kearsarge off the French coast at Cherbourg in June 1864, and what remains of the Alabama now lies in 200 feet of water. But two years of difficult marine archaeology has begun to bring bits of its history into the sunlight for the first time in almost 130 years.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
Therese Martin entered the Carmelite monastery in Lisieux, France, in 1888 as a teen-ager and remained there until her death from tuberculosis at age 24.Her fellow sisters saw nothing extraordinary about her life. She was just a good sister who practiced "the little way," which she described as doing the ordinary things of life with extraordinary love.But a century later, millions of Roman Catholics are venerating the relics of St. Therese of Lisieux as they travel on a worldwide tour. The reliquary containing some of her bones arrived in Baltimore yesterday afternoon as part of a four-month U.S. tour and continues its journey tomorrow, departing for Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 15, 2002
HARRISBURG, Pa. - One hundred and thirty-nine years after the climactic charge at the Battle of Gettysburg, Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett's Confederate cap rests here north of the Mason-Dixon line, a prime historic relic that has seen better but hardly richer days. With the recent sentencing of the last of three convicted con men in the top-dollar underworld of ill-gotten Civil War memorabilia, the general's nattily crushed kepi is encased like a gray-and-gold punctuation mark in the year-old National Civil War Museum.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
To understand the appeal of sacred relics, which have caused wars and attracted devout pilgrims for nearly a millennium, look no further than Babe Ruth's bat. Baseball fans in Baltimore forked over $10 last week to hold the Sultan of Swat's 32-ounce club with seven notches on the handle. It was a similar impulse that guided a 12th century German worshipper to encase inside a small gold and silver box some twigs thought to be from the manger where Jesus Christ was born, plus a piece of the cross on which he was crucified.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2010
Three giant steel beams twisted and fused together during the collapse of the North Tower of New York's World Trade Center in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The rubble, which arrived Tuesday, will be reborn as Maryland's 9/11 memorial, to be erected at Baltimore's World Trade Center in time for the 10th anniversary of the attacks. Gov. Martin O'Malley called it "a sacred and holy relic," and his voice faltered as he said he would do his part to ensure that the state never forgets the 43 Marylanders who died when airplanes smashed into the towers and the Pentagon in Virginia.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Fourteen years after Mother Teresa's last visit to Baltimore, her blood, her hair and several of her personal effects returned to the city Wednesday. The items, which also include a rosary and sandals worn by the candidate for Catholic sainthood, were displayed for several hours at the hospice for AIDS patients she opened in East Baltimore in 1992. In the chapel at the Gift of Hope hospice on Ashland Avenue, operated by Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, Shirley Sapp paused before the frayed shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2010
How do you clean a 2,000-year-old sarcophagus and get it ready for a road trip to Cleveland? Very, very carefully. Walters Art Museum conservators have spent the past three years restoring a 500-pound, child-size coffin, elaborately carved with winged goddesses, Medusa heads, the masks of comedy and tragedy, and the offerings of fruit and flowers left as tributes to the dead. The conservators have used an instrument resembling a space-age-style ray gun to detect lingering traces of red paint that has lasted for nearly two millennia — an accomplishment that seemingly eludes the manufacturers of modern-day wall-colorings.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | August 22, 2008
My witty neighbor Sebastian has a term for it: al desko. That gives it some much-needed panache, but in the end, it's still just you and your ham-and-swiss-on-rye, at your desk and on the job rather than out for a midday meal at a restaurant with friends or colleagues. Chalk it up as yet another sign of a dying civilization, but polls show that nearly 60 percent of workers lunch al desko these days. And that sad fact, I'm convinced, is why Baltimore's Ad Club is going to be celebrating its 100th anniversary next year as an exhibit at the Maryland Historical Society, rather than as a living, breathing and lunching group.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | June 1, 2008
St. Francis Xavier, one of the founders with Ignatius Loyola of the Society of Jesus in 1534, journeyed to India and later the Far East, where he helped establish the mission of the Roman Catholic Church. Known as "The Apostle of the Indies," Xavier wrote of his conquest for converts, "Give me souls. These people are the delight of my soul." While attempting to enter China, Xavier was stricken with a fever and died on the island of Sancian Dec. 3, 1552. After several months, his body was exhumed and found to be "incorrupt."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
Whenever Cecilia Hartle loses something, she prays to St. Anthony of Padua, the patron of lost objects and -- like magic -- she says her possessions appear.Today, she'll get a rare opportunity to venerate her favorite saint, when relics of the 13th-century Italian religious figure go on display at the Companions of St. Anthony, Conventual Franciscan Friars in Ellicott City.The relics -- bits of the saint's flesh enclosed in ornate reliquaries -- are on a 10-state tour of the United States, part of their first worldwide tour since St. Anthony's remains were extracted from his tomb in Padua, Italy, in 1981.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
The fragments of the stone tablet - a memorial to John Henry Carroll, brother of one of Colonial Maryland's wealthiest merchants - would never have been discovered had a careless painter not backed his pickup truck into a monument in an Annapolis churchyard. The accident left a gaping hole, through which parishioners of St. Anne's Church could see that the nearly 200-year-old monument marking the Carroll family tomb contained the tablet fragments - the last remaining pieces of Annapolis' first church.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 7, 2007
Colonial Players' season opener, Michael Hollinger's Incorruptible, irreverently looks at the practices inside a 13th-century French monastery, positing that ends can justify the means under desperate conditions while laughing at naive beliefs in the miraculous powers of relics. At Sunday's matinee performance, some of us in the predominantly senior audience were amused at how much we flawed folk today have in common with the monks who promised bigger miracles than their competitors. Today we are promised miraculous restorations of youth in cosmetic and drug ads, and for contemporary hypocrisy unmasked we need look no further than last week's headlines.
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