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By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 28, 2010
A State Department employee, speaking to a woman whose husband was kidnapped in the Middle East: "I wish I could take your pain away." Woman's reply: "I wish you could remember it." The tension between those two characters, each with her own set of values and perceptions of duty, provides a great deal of the dramatic weight in Lee Blessing's "Two Rooms," a play that hasn't lost much relevance or bite 22 years after its premiere. If anything, the issues and conflicts addressed can produce an even sharper sting today, when so much of the world is on edge, week in and week out, from the threat of terrorism - and when governments have not necessarily become any more effective at dealing with that threat.
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NEWS
Jules Witcover | July 28, 2014
Congressional midterm elections, the poor cousin to presidential voting in the American political system, will take on a critical role for President Barack Obama in November. The results may well determine whether he will become a premature lame duck two years before his second and last term expires. If the Democrats lose the U.S. Senate, where they hold a practical 55-45 voting control with the help of Independent Sen. Angus King of Maine, the Republicans will be able to intensify the obstructionism with which they have paralyzed the Obama legislative agenda in the House of Representatives over the last nearly six years.
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NEWS
By Les Payne | November 3, 1998
I WAS introduced to H. L. Mencken during an assignment as an army captain in Vietnam. I was based in Saigon as an information officer -- the Army's version of a journalist. This military specialty, I might add, resembles journalism to about the same degree that Army food resembles food.After work each night, three of us journalists, so-called, would repair to the officers' club on the roof of our hotel. While the other officers watched a movie, the three of us took turns in breaking the monotony by leading a discussion about our favorite writers.
NEWS
By Larry R. Faulkner and Donald N. Langenberg | June 25, 2014
Would you trust a surgeon who learned a few tricks in medical school, then spent the first couple of years in the operating room experimenting while he figured out which techniques worked? Of course you wouldn't. But, unfortunately, that's the same level of preparation that too many of our nation's teachers receive before setting foot in the classroom. Last week, the National Council on Teacher Quality released its exhaustive study of what's going on inside America's teaching institutions.
NEWS
By LEONARD KRIEGEL | September 4, 1992
Back in the embattled 1970s, Americans were deluged by demands for ''relevant theater,'' ''relevant education,'' ''relevant music,'' even ''relevant welfare.'' We didn't wake up until confronted with ''relevant diets.''Now, ''relevant'' is mocked out of usage. Like most language jTC victories, however, the triumph was short-lived. Instead of ''relevant,'' we have ''suitable role model.''What America's young need, we are incessantly told, are ''suitable role models.'' We may have produced a generation lacking literacy, skill, even a sense of style.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 24, 1995
PRESIDENT CLINTON was asked at his press conference last Wednesday night about the fact that "Republicans have dominated political debate in this country since they took over Congress in January."He answered this way: "The Constitution gives me relevance. . . The president is relevant here." He read between the lines of the question. He saw that the real issue is the belief that Congress PTC not merely dominates but rules, for the first time in at least six decades.The question was, in fact, related to journalism's apparent ignoring of the president.
NEWS
June 29, 2005
Tip of the week: Resumes for older workers If you are a seasoned member of the work force, you may want to prepare a functional resume instead of a chronological one. Rather than focus on dates, review relevant experiences and prepare a resume that highlights the major aspects of the position sought. Focus on your last 10 years of experience - the years most relevant to employers. Describe your competencies in a way that indicates both the depth and breadth without getting too technical.
NEWS
By Chris Riback | May 22, 1995
WITH all the talk among the Republican "revolutionaries" in the 104th Congress about change, the group of Americans who can expect to be helped the least is young voters. One key reason: in the November 1994 election, Generation Xers couldn't find their way to the polls. In record numbers, twentysome things stayed home or went to the gym or went shopping for compact discs. Unlike the 1992 election, what they didn't do was vote.Last November, 18- to 29-year-olds accounted for just 14 percent of all voters; in '92, they comprised 21 percent.
NEWS
April 20, 1997
Yates dismissal of Baltimore was embarrassmentThe article in The Sun on March 20, entitled, "Officials bypass area event discussing racial problems" by Mary Gail Hare, was well-written and addressed clearly the crucial need for citizens of Carroll County to join with our sisters and brothers from the city to address the issue of racism."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Paul West and Susan Baer and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to make his voice heard above the Republican roar, President Clinton insisted last night that he remains relevant to setting the national agenda.In a rare prime time news conference, his first since Republicans took control of Congress in November, Mr. Clinton sought to reclaim the spotlight that has eluded him in recent months."The Constitution gives me relevance," Mr. Clinton said. "The president is relevant here, especially an activist president, and the fact that I am willing to work with the Republicans."
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | May 25, 2014
While Cornell William Brooks may be a surprising choice to lead the NAACP, it takes neither an Einstein nor a soothsayer to know what challenges lie ahead for the clergyman-lawyer little known beyond his social justice network in New Jersey. Three words: money, membership, mission. The NAACP, headquartered in Baltimore, has always had difficulty financing the cause of freedom. The new chief has been tasked with increasing both fundraising and membership by 20 percent - a tall order for an organization that too many people look to only in times of personal peril.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | May 9, 2014
The Baltimore County Commission for Women is old but new. Founded by the County Council in 1977, two years ago the commission revised its mission to make the county-sponsored board more vital and relevant to women. The commission's upcoming event on Saturday, May 10, a Women's Empowerment Expo, is an example of this new direction. Workshops on credit strategies and starting your own business, budgeting and résumé writing are not only practical but geared toward a younger audience than previous commission offerings.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 24, 2014
It was an angry book. Much of the response was angry, too. Some towns banned it, some towns burned it. Every town talked about it. "The Grapes of Wrath" was published 75 years ago this month, a seminal masterpiece of American literature that seems freshly relevant to this era of wealth disparity, rapacious banks and growing poverty. John Steinbeck introduced readers to the Joads, a poor, proud clan of Depression-era Oklahoma farmers who...
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
The Blast has been released from the United Soccer Leagues and its affiliate, the Major Indoor Soccer League , Blast owner Ed Hale said Wednesday. The team is working on becoming part of a new, expanded league, Hale said. The team's three-year contract with the USL, which runs the MISL, expired at the end of 2013-14 season. A number of other MISL franchises, including the Blast's longtime rival Milwaukee Wave, also have been released from the USL/MISL and are pursuing play in a new league.
NEWS
By C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger | March 24, 2014
As congressman of the 2nd District of Maryland, I am proud to represent the men and women of the National Security Agency. They serve and sacrifice for our country every day, often in dangerous situations, and I applaud them for their work. As the senior Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, I am also proud to oversee the intelligence community on behalf of the American people as a whole, ensuring that our intelligence organizations get the tools necessary to keep us, and our allies safe, while ensuring the highest levels of civil liberty and privacy protection.
NEWS
December 29, 2013
In the spring of 2008, as the prospect that America would elect its first black president became more and more likely, the organization that did as much as any to make that watershed possible had fallen on hard times. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, America's oldest and best known civil rights group, was in disarray. It's last president and CEO had abruptly quit, and it had laid off half of its staff to balance the books. Its membership and relevance in what many were heralding as a post-racial America seemed destined to wane, and one of the defining institutions of the 20th century had no sure place in the 21st.
NEWS
October 20, 1992
Excerpts from the third and final presidential debate:ON CLINTON'S RECORD* Mr. Bush: "Look at [Arkansas]. And that's what we're asking America to have?"Now look, he says Arkansas's a poor state. They are. But in almost every category, they're lagging. I'll give you an example."He talks about all the jobs he's created in one or two years. Over the last 10 years since he's been governor, they're 30 percent behind -- 30 percent -- they're 30 percent of the national average -- on pay for teachers, on all these categories, Arkansas is right near the very bottom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
One hundred years ago, Bohemian-born William Oktavec, a butcher by trade and a would-be artist, arrived in Baltimore from New York with his wife and young son. He set up a grocery shop at the corner of North Collington and Ashland avenues in the area known as Little Bohemia. During the summer, Oktavec installed a screen on the front door of his business and made it more than an insect deterrent. He painted it with images of the meat and vegetables available inside. Passersby could not see through the wire mesh into the shop, but anyone inside could see out as easily as if the screen were unadorned.
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