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Relationship With Lewinsky

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With President Clinton's worries shifting from the grand jury room to Capitol Hill, his senior aides are considering proposing that he hire an outside expert to help blunt any congressional inquiry into a report by independent prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr, White House officials said yesterday.The move is one of several debated inside the White House over the past week, as Clinton's political strategists searched for ways to help him rebuild public confidence, retain support of congressional Democrats and begin to campaign again for his policy goals.
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NEWS
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOK EDITOR | February 25, 1999
As jackals tracked Hemingway's safaris, books follow historic disasters. Whether one considers her a disaster, a victim, a jackal or all three, Monica Lewinsky occupied an enormous number of column inches and broadcast minutes in 1998.Now that President Clinton has been impeached and acquitted, the book-publishing world is in full pursuit of the subject.The hottest title, "Monica's Story," comes to shops from St. Martin's Press a week from today, but 20 or more other titles devoted or significantly related to the Lewinsky and impeachment affair are in print, near publication or under contract.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 1998
WASHINGTON - President Clinton's personal secretary has told investigators that Clinton summoned her hours after he testified in the Paula Corbin Jones lawsuit and led her through an account of his relationship with Monica Lewinsky that mirrored that testimony, said lawyers familiar with her account and his testimony.Betty Currie has told investigators that Clinton asserted that he had never been alone with Lewinsky and that he had resisted her sexual advances, the lawyers said.They paraphrased Currie as saying that the president had portrayed his relationship with Lewinsky through such questions "We were never alone, right?"
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Mindful of the political risks, President Clinton's legal defense strategy has steered remarkably clear of Monica Lewinsky's character and credibility, leaving unanswered many of the prosecution's most scathing assertions of presidential wrongdoing.As a result, prosecution attacks have gone unrebutted. White House arguments have been truncated. The central perjury counts regarding exactly what Clinton did with Lewinsky have never really been challenged.But, Democratic lawyers say, it would have been far more damaging -- legally and politically -- for the president's attorneys to have targeted Lewinsky.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Responding to deadlines both legal and practical, Whitewater special prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr revved up his multipronged investigation in both Arkansas and Washington yesterday."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 1998
MOSCOW -- Russia may be in acute economic and political crisis. The course of reform in this battered nuclear power and the very future of President Boris N. Yeltsin may be in doubt.But of three questions put to President Clinton by American reporters during a press conference yesterday in the stately Catherine Hall of the Kremlin, two were about Monica Lewinsky.Clinton answered them without really answering, declining to use the opportunity to issue a more formal apology for misleading the nation about his relationship with Lewinsky, and betraying no particular emotion or discomfort.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 1998
MOSCOW -- Russia may be in acute economic and political crisis. The course of reform in this battered nuclear power and the very future of President Boris N. Yeltsin may be in doubt.But of three questions put to President Clinton by American reporters during a press conference yesterday in the stately Catherine Hall of the Kremlin, two were about Monica Lewinsky.Clinton answered them without really answering, declining to use the opportunity to issue a more formal apology for misleading the nation about his relationship with Lewinsky, and betraying no particular emotion or discomfort.
NEWS
By Susan Baer BTC and Susan Baer BTC,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Nearly every day over the past six months there has been some new development in the White House sex and perjury scandal: a legal battle, a grand jury witness, a statement on the courthouse steps.But for all the news -- setbacks, victories, revelations -- the basic story strayed little from the one the public heard when the name Monica Lewinsky first surfaced in mid-January.That's all changing now.In the past week, independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr secured what he needed most, what has been most elusive to him and what should finally bring his investigation -- four years old this week -- to some sort of conclusion.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers Jonathan Weisman, David L. Greene, Geoffrey C. Upton and Mark Matthews contributed to this article | August 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In an extraordinary admission, President Clinton acknowledged to the nation last night that, contrary to his denials for the past seven months, he engaged in a relationship with Monica Lewinsky that was "not appropriate" and constituted a "personal failure on my part for which I am solely and completely responsible."Clinton, speaking in a four-minute televised address from the White House, did not disclose any details of that relationship. He said his deposition in the Paula Corbin Jones case, in which he denied having "sexual relations" with the former White House intern, was "legally accurate."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Jan. 17, 1998. Sitting against a stark white wall, occasionally sipping from a white coffee cup, President Clinton appeared cool, even confident at the very moment he was putting his presidency in jeopardy.Sometimes pausing when asked about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky, Clinton nonetheless seemed at ease with his answers as he calmly denied a sexual relationship with Lewinsky and said he couldn't remember even being alone with her."I have never had sexual relations with Monica Lewinsky," he said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Jan. 17, 1998. Sitting against a stark white wall, occasionally sipping from a white coffee cup, President Clinton appeared cool, even confident at the very moment he was putting his presidency in jeopardy.Sometimes pausing when asked about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky, Clinton nonetheless seemed at ease with his answers as he calmly denied a sexual relationship with Lewinsky and said he couldn't remember even being alone with her."I have never had sexual relations with Monica Lewinsky," he said.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In the end, the initial news report about Monica Lewinsky's evidence-laced blue dress turned out to be right. The reports about the importance of the "talking points" to the independent counsel's case turned out to be wrong.But, in general, despite criticism by both the White House and pro-prosecution forces, the media acted responsibly and cautiously in reporting on the Lewinsky scandal, according to a study by a consortium of news professionals and academics released yesterday.
NEWS
By Paul West and Susan Baer and Paul West and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers Ellen Gamerman, Marcia Myers and Jean Marbella contributed to this article | October 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Months before she began secretly taping Monica Lewinsky, Linda R. Tripp set out to expose President Clinton's affair with the former White House intern, believing the president's actions were an "unconscionable" abuse of power, according to testimony by Tripp made public yesterday.Tripp's justification for her betraying her former friend -- one of the enduring mysteries of the Lewinsky matter -- is one of many new details to emerge from 4,610 additional pages of documents sent to Congress by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With the specter of impeachment looming, the House of Representatives beamed President Clinton's sexually explicit grand jury session into millions of American homes yesterday. The national television audience saw an evasive Clinton spar with prosecutors over intimate details of his private life but give no ground on his denial of a sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky.As expected, the four hours of history-making videotape included graphic and, at times, shocking descriptions of intimate behavior involving the president and the former White House intern.
NEWS
By Susan Baer PTC and Susan Baer PTC,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Soon after Monica Lewinsky joined the White House in the summer of 1995, she developed a relationship with President Clinton that progressed quickly from "intense flirting" to an array of sexual encounters to -- on her part at least -- a deep emotional attachment.Her account of the affair, revealed yesterday through the release of Kenneth W. Starr's report to Congress, includes graphic details of the sexual activities the former White House intern says the two engaged in over a period of 17 months -- generally in or near a private study off the Oval Office -- until Clinton abruptly cut off the relationship in May 1997 before a weeping Lewinsky.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Finally delivering the kind of soul-baring speech of remorse that his critics and allies alike have been calling for, President Clinton, his eyes welled with tears at times, told religious leaders yesterday, "I have sinned" and "I have repented."Hours before a humiliating accounting of his misdeeds in the Monica Lewinsky scandal was made known to the world, Clinton spoke to a hushed audience of more than 100 ministers, rabbis and other clergy at a long-scheduled White House prayer breakfast.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has virtually cleared his calendar this weekend to prepare for his grand jury testimony in the Monica Lewinsky investigation on Monday afternoon. But he will not decide whether to give a public address to the country until he finishes answering prosecutors' questions on closed-circuit television, White House officials said yesterday.Clinton's lead private attorney, David Kendall, has complained that Clinton has spent almost no time preparing for the grand jury session, a White House spokesman said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer David Folkenflik contributed to this article | January 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With a unifying political agenda and a popular president, Democrats in Congress looked with relish just two weeks ago toward the 1998 political season.Today, as that season begins, the party faithful are keeping their president at arm's length and tip-toeing into Washington rather than taking the town by storm.Democrats put on a brave face yesterday, publicly promising that the sex scandal swirling around President Clinton would not derail their carefully crafted agenda.Rep.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 1998
MOSCOW -- Russia may be in acute economic and political crisis. The course of reform in this battered nuclear power and the very future of President Boris N. Yeltsin may be in doubt.But of three questions put to President Clinton by American reporters during a press conference yesterday in the stately Catherine Hall of the Kremlin, two were about Monica Lewinsky.Clinton answered them without really answering, declining to use the opportunity to issue a more formal apology for misleading the nation about his relationship with Lewinsky, and betraying no particular emotion or discomfort.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 1998
MOSCOW -- Russia may be in acute economic and political crisis. The course of reform in this battered nuclear power and the very future of President Boris N. Yeltsin may be in doubt.But of three questions put to President Clinton by American reporters during a press conference yesterday in the stately Catherine Hall of the Kremlin, two were about Monica Lewinsky.Clinton answered them without really answering, declining to use the opportunity to issue a more formal apology for misleading the nation about his relationship with Lewinsky, and betraying no particular emotion or discomfort.
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