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NEWS
November 26, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON, his stature enhanced at the Asian summit by his re-election, was very much the leader of an ascendant superpower as he moved to improve relations with China, scored a breakthrough in the U.S. drive to lower tariffs and even provided climb-down room for a North Korea that wasn't on the invite list.On China, he arranged for an exchange of presidential visits in 1997 and 1998 that could serve as a backdrop for Beijing's entry into the World Trade Organization. Implicit was a firmer U.S. intention to separate its concerns about China's human rights violations from further threats of trade retaliation.
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NEWS
By Steve Phillips | May 23, 2008
While upheaval in Tibet and a devastating earthquake in Sichuan have dominated the headlines over the past month, the greatest danger to East Asian stability and Sino-American relations is another crisis in the Taiwan Strait. The people of Taiwan are ambivalent about cross-strait ties, and some demand independence, despite threats from the People's Republic of China. Washington has called for peaceful resolution of the dispute while pressuring Taiwan's leaders to avoid provocations and demanding that China's leaders eschew violence.
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NEWS
June 26, 1997
An article in Wednesday's editions incorrectly reported the votes of Maryland's U.S. House delegation on a resolution to cut off normal trade relations with China. Republicans Wayne T. Gilchrest of the Eastern Shore and Constance A. Morella of Montgomery County opposed the resolution. The other six members of the delegation supported it.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/26/97
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 2004
TAIPEI - A day after an apparent assassination attempt against their president, Taiwan's voters go to the polls today in what may be the most important election in their history, as President Chen Shui-bian competes against a challenger offering a more conciliatory policy toward Taiwan's powerful neighbor, China. China claims Taiwan as its territory and is clearly, if unofficially, rooting for a defeat for Chen, who Chinese authorities fear is more likely to push for formal independence than is his challenger, Lien Chan.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 19, 2001
George campaigned for the presidency promising to worsen relations with China and is reneging on his word. There is only one China, and three of them are in APEC. Putin is doing everything we could wish, and nobody in Washington can figure out why. They found a little anthrax in the Senate. So the House shut down. Senators are 70 and think, if it comes it comes. Reps are 50 and want to grow up to become senators.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Chinese leaders have told the United States that they plan to take a "wait-and-see" attitude toward Taiwan's new president and that they are open to resuming dialogue with the estranged island, a senior administration official said yesterday. The Chinese assurances, if borne out, come at a crucial time for the administration, which is scrambling to put relations with China on an even keel before President Clinton leaves office and to persuade Congress to upgrade economic relations with China.
NEWS
May 10, 1996
IN A SPEECH that can be properly described as presidential, Sen. Bob Dole has held to his belief in a policy of normal trading relations with China. His consistency was not without political purpose, for he contrasted it with President Clinton's "complete reversal" on this issue. As a candidate in 1992, he said, Mr. Clinton first described George Bush's policy of extending "most favored nation" trade status to China as "immoral" and then accepted it once he was in office.The presumptive Republican presidential nominee held that Mr. Clinton's "conspicuous silence" on China trade policy had created a situation in which MFN will be a "tough sell" in Congress, where it is opposed by protectionists and human rights activists in both parties.
NEWS
March 25, 1994
Japan and South Korea have no trouble making the connection between China and North Korea. As the Communist regime in Pyongyang threatens war and defies international efforts to close down its nuclear weapons program, the leaders of our two key allies in East Asia are making the pilgrimage to Beijing to seek China's help in controlling the situation. Too bad the United States did not follow the same course instead of exacerbating relations with China over human rights.The Clinton administration at least is not letting North Korea's provocations push it to a quick showdown.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 1998
BEIJING -- On the eve of his departure for Asia last week, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen pressed the Clinton administration to let a U.S. arms maker sell spare parts to China, despite a ban on sales of military equipment imposed after the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989, administration officials say.Cohen did not advocate a general lifting of the sanctions, the officials said, but rather suggested making an exception in the case of Sikorsky Aircraft...
NEWS
July 17, 1997
IN THEIR behavior, Russia and China are demonstrating the old adage that countries have no permanent friends, only permanent interests. Both recognize the economic and military supremacy of the United States. But both also worry about excessive U.S. dominance. They want to limit it. That's why they are busy improving bilateral relations.It is unlikely that Moscow and Beijing ever again will be as close allies as they were during the Stalinist Soviet Union.The former Soviet Union became recognized as a world superpower; China did not. But today, China's domestic and export economic engine is growing at an explosive rate; post-communist Russia's is not.When President Jiang Zemin visited Moscow earlier this year, the two countries agreed to improve their relations.
NEWS
By Rollie Lal | August 3, 2003
WASHINGTON -- China and India, which together are home to a third of all people on Earth, are moving from decades of confrontation to a new relationship of cooperation that will have global impact. Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee has produced a promising set of agreements to help settle a long-standing border dispute, increase trade and decrease mutual distrust between the two giant Asian nations and their combined populations of 2.2 billion people. Both countries fought a border war in 1962, leaving a sense of suspicion and tension between them that lasted for years.
NEWS
August 8, 2002
TAIWAN, STRIKINGLY wealthy and the Chinese world's first democracy, continues to be vexed on the world stage by mainland China -- the only China recognized by major powers. Taipei's goal of negotiating as equals with Beijing a resolution of their half-century conflict is stalled. China's recent shift from threatening the island to luring its business is paying big dividends, drawing billions in investment to the mainland and fostering greater economic allegiance on the island. Against that frustration comes Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian's inflammatory remarks last weekend in which he dared to speak the officially unspeakable: Taiwan and China are separate countries -- and the island should hold a referendum on independence.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 19, 2001
George campaigned for the presidency promising to worsen relations with China and is reneging on his word. There is only one China, and three of them are in APEC. Putin is doing everything we could wish, and nobody in Washington can figure out why. They found a little anthrax in the Senate. So the House shut down. Senators are 70 and think, if it comes it comes. Reps are 50 and want to grow up to become senators.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 14, 2001
TAIPEI, Taiwan - Taiwan's foreign minister said yesterday that Taipei could accept a Bush administration decision not to sell the island warships equipped with the sophisticated Aegis weapons system. "It isn't the end of the world" if Washington decides not to include the Aegis system, which can detect and track more than 100 missiles, aircraft, surface vessels or submarines at a time, in the package of weapons it sells Taiwan, Tien Hung-mao said in an interview. "Aegis has been singled out as the weapon Taiwan has to have.
NEWS
May 23, 2000
THE VOTE in Congress on permanent normal trade relations with China looms as a showdown between two world view -- one isolationist, the other internationalist. It was possible to argue the isolationist view in the 1920s and 1930s, when the United States helped design the League of Nations but stayed out, promoted exports but walled out imports, lamented Japan's invasion of Manchuria but did nothing about it. But the judgment of history is that those policies were misguided, inviting the Great Depression, totalitarian aggression and even Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Chinese leaders have told the United States that they plan to take a "wait-and-see" attitude toward Taiwan's new president and that they are open to resuming dialogue with the estranged island, a senior administration official said yesterday. The Chinese assurances, if borne out, come at a crucial time for the administration, which is scrambling to put relations with China on an even keel before President Clinton leaves office and to persuade Congress to upgrade economic relations with China.
NEWS
June 13, 1997
HOW LONG, pray tell, will the U.S. Congress go through the annual charade of pretending it is really, honest-to-gosh thinking of ending normal trade relations with China?Perhaps as long as Nancy Pelosi, a California liberal, and Christopher Smith, a New Jersey religious conservative, find common cause in assailing Beijing's deplorable human rights record; or House minority leader Richard Gephardt pushes his campaign for the presidency.As everyone on Capitol Hill well knows, the latest effort to rescind the mis-named "most favored nation" (MFN)
NEWS
May 23, 2000
THE VOTE in Congress on permanent normal trade relations with China looms as a showdown between two world view -- one isolationist, the other internationalist. It was possible to argue the isolationist view in the 1920s and 1930s, when the United States helped design the League of Nations but stayed out, promoted exports but walled out imports, lamented Japan's invasion of Manchuria but did nothing about it. But the judgment of history is that those policies were misguided, inviting the Great Depression, totalitarian aggression and even Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 26, 1999
SINGAPORE -- Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright said yesterday that a two-hour meeting here with China's top diplomat had eased tensions with Beijing and begun to repair nearly paralyzed relations between the world's most populous nation and its most powerful one.Most important, the two sides announced that President Clinton will meet with Chinese President Jiang Zemin during an Asia Pacific economic forum in mid-September in Wellington, New Zealand,...
NEWS
June 6, 1999
WHEN Gov. George W. Bush of Texas finally came off the fence on an issue it was, rightly and responsibly, to endorse President Clinton's decision to renew normal trade relations with China for another year. He was echoed by another Republican candidate for president, Elizabeth H. Dole.Governor Bush is the son of the president whose China policy President Clinton is extending. Mrs. Dole as a cabinet secretary supported that policy. Although Congress will be tempted to overturn President Clinton's decision for a number of reasons -- some genuine -- quick reactions by these leading Republicans made it a policy issue, not a partisan bash.
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