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By BRADLEY OLSON | January 21, 2006
A military judge rejected yesterday a request by a Naval Academy oceanography professor to have the sexual harassment charges lodged against him reinvestigated by someone outside the chain of command at the academy. In an e-mail to lawyers involved in the case, a military judge at the Washington Navy Yard denied a defense request contending that Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt, the academy's superintendent, created an "unlawful command influence" that biased the charges against Lt. Bryan Black.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A 20-group coalition on Thursday called on state regulators to reject a proposed merger between Chicago energy giant Exelon Corp. and Pepco Holdings Inc., citing Exelon's track record on the environment and fears the deal would give it too much power in the state. Exelon, the parent company of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., ComEd and PECO, in April announced a $6.9 billion deal to acquire the smaller Washington-based utility company, which owns Delmarva Power and Atlantic City Electric as well as Pepco.
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and John Morris and Frank Langfitt and John Morris,Sun Staff Writers | June 15, 1995
In an unusual move yesterday, state officials rejected a request by Anne Arundel County for $300,000 to pay for a small park to help revitalize an aging Annapolis suburb.Members of the state Board of Public Works said they found the price too high for the 2.8 acres. Members also questioned the logic of buying the property, which largely can't be developed because most of it lies in a flood plain and contains steep banks."If they're not able to build on that, why are we buying it for $300,000?"
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A raucous tailgate last weekend in which students were dancing on the roofs of cars and were "hostile" and "uncooperative" prompted Towson University officials to consider banning student tailgating at football games the rest of the season. Though officials ultimately decided Wednesday to reject such a ban, they will discuss with student leaders over the next several days potential changes to the college's tailgating policy and its enforcement prior to football games at Johnny Unitas Stadium.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | December 3, 2005
Attorneys for Wesley Eugene Baker failed yesterday to persuade two courts to postpone Baker's execution by lethal injection, which could occur as early as Monday. Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan rejected a request to halt the execution based on a claim that the protocol approved for the execution required further review, including public input. Kaplan said that to halt the execution based on the arguments by Baker's attorneys would rewind more than a decade of court proceedings.
NEWS
August 23, 2003
The historic Dumbarton House in Pikesville could still be yours. The mortgage company in possession of the 140-year-old Victorian mansion rejected the top bid of $800,000 at a public auction yesterday, so it remains on the market. The asking price is $1.2 million. The main portion of the storied house was built in 1860 by one of Baltimore's wealthiest residents as a wedding gift to his son. It now sits on just one acre, down from 479 acres more than a century ago. It has six bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, six fireplaces and 12-foot ceilings.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The political confrontation hardened yesterday between the administration and the Senate over four fairly routine Schaefer appointments as the full Senate followed a committee recommendation to reject the nominees.But Gov. William Donald Schaefer's patronage secretary said the appointments actually had been withdrawn before they got to the Executive Nominations Committee so that both the committee and ther Senate were acting on something not even before them."I think they certainly went out of their way to make this statement, beyond what the rules are," said Robert A. Pascal, the administration's appointments secretary.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | August 5, 2008
A judge yesterday rejected a motion to dismiss the charges against a former Howard County teacher accused of having inappropriate sexual contact with several students. The trial for Alan Meade Beier, a former science teacher at River Hill High School, had been scheduled to begin this week. Although Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. rejected the defense motion to dismiss the charges during a hearing in Howard County Circuit Court, Howard County prosecutors plan to drop charges against Beier in order to reindict him before a grand jury tomorrow, said Wayne Kirwan, a spokesman for the state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1994
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has rejected a former secretary's charges that the Baltimore County Executive sexually harassed her in 1992 and finally forced her to resign.The brief ruling, received July 1 by the county office of law, declares that the investigation produced no evidence that Niculina V. Robinson's complaints of poor treatment at work resulted from any rejection of sexual advances by Mr. Hayden, or that she was removed from her position and forced to resign.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush suffered a political defeat yesterday when the Senate Judiciary Committee rejected his nomination of Judge Kenneth Ryskamp of Miami to a seat on the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.On a party-line, 8-6 vote, the panel bowed to critics who charged Judge Ryskamp with a pattern of insensitive behavior toward minorities, voting against the nomination and, on a 7-7 tie, refusing to send Judge Ryskamp's name on to the full Senate without recommendation.The latter action effectively removed the nominee from consideration.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney argued in Circuit Court Friday that city election workers "messed up" when they ruled he did not have enough signatures to appear on the November ballot.  "Just because they say it's so, don't make it so," said Edward Smith Jr., the attorney for candidate Russell A. Neverdon Sr. "Each and every [signature] they looked at, they messed up. " Judge Martin P. Welch said he will postpone ruling on the case until after he hears more evidence next Friday.  The city's Board of Elections said earlier this monrth that Neverdon fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby on the general election ballot.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz proposed a new 700-seat elementary school near the center of Towson on Friday to relieve overcrowding, telling the school superintendent that he won't fund the school system's plans to renovate two other schools. In a letter to Baltimore County school Superintendent Dallas Dance, the county executive said he is withdrawing support for renovations to the former Loch Raven Elementary and Cromwell Valley Elementary because they are too costly.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
One-fourth of the names on Maryland's sex offender registry could be removed after the state's top court expanded Monday on an earlier ruling that adding offenders from before the list was created violated the state constitution. The Court of Appeals declared last year that the state could not require the registration of people who committed their crimes before October 1995, when the database was established. State officials removed the one name in question in that case but maintained that federal law required them to keep older cases in the database.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Most political endorsements touted by candidates typically elicit yawns. Until they garner gasps. Del. Jon Cardin, a Democratic candidate for Maryland attorney general, rejected an impromptu endorsement he landed last week from a rapper with a rap sheet. At a fundraiser, Cardin posed for a photo with Ski Money — aka Lawrence S. Christian — without knowing of the 37-year-old's criminal record. The rapper posted the photo to Instagram and Twitter with a note encouraging his followers to vote for Cardin.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Del. Jon Cardin rejected Thursday the endorsement of a Baltimore-based rapper after learning that the man who calls himself Ski Money is facing charges of human trafficking. Cardin, a candidate for attorney general, said he knew nothing of the rapper's charges and criminal record when he posed for a picture with Lawrence S. Christian, 37, at a fundraiser and his campaign briefly publicized the rapper's support. "I recently learned of the charges that are pending against Mr. Christian, a Baltimore based rapper who endorsed me over Twitter," Cardin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said in a statement.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
In his zeal to make the case supporting the propriety of public prayer, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. bases his argument on two falsehoods ( "Freedom of, not from, religion," June 1). First, he says "the framers never used the phrase 'separation of church and state' - except that Thomas Jefferson coined that phrase, approvingly, in his letter to the Danbury Baptist Church. James Madison used the same language in his letter to Robert Walsh. Since these men are, respectively, the authors of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights, I believe they do qualify as the "framers.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Maryland's new method of executing murderers with a lethal injection of drugs withstood a constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court yesterday.Without comment, the court turned down the appeal of Tyrone Delano Gilliam Jr., who is awaiting execution for the 1988 murder of a woman outside her townhouse development in Baltimore County.His case was rejected by the justices on the opening day of their new term, as was a new appeal by Vernon Lee Evans Jr., who has been sentenced to die for the murder-for-hire killing in Pikesville in 1983 of two witnesses in a federal drug case.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 16, 2001
A bill that would have banned the use of hand-held cellular phones while driving was killed yesterday by a House of Delegates committee. The Commerce and Government Matters Committee voted 14-7 to reject the bill proposed by Del. John S. Arnick, a Baltimore County Democrat. The bill would have made Maryland the first state to adopt such a ban. Advocates had hoped lawmakers would be swayed by a 1999 case in which a car went off the Capital Beltway and killed a New York couple. The Fort Washington driver was talking on his cell phone when the accident occurred.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
The Matthew A. Henson Neighborhood Association, which represents more than 1,000 homes, business and churches and is over 50 years old, recently unanimously opposed the Baltimore City Council's curfew bill ( "Council approves tough new curfew for city youth," May 12). It is the sincere belief of our residents that passage of this bill will bring about both a discriminatory and arbitrary implementation. While we readily agree that we, as parents, first and foremost, and fellow residents, must significantly improve upon the actions and conduct of our children, the city has not fully and successfully implemented the current curfew.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
The centrist shift of the Republican Party, first observed last fall with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's landslide re-election, continued this week with GOP establishment candidates defeating tea party challengers in primary races. The most visible was Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's trouncing of a conservative opponent who was once running ahead of him in polls. Mr. McConnell is nobody's moderate, but he's no tea party absolutist either. What he represents — and what voters in Kentucky clearly endorsed — is an establishment Republican, the kind who believes in lower taxes and smaller government but not in shutting down the federal government or other forms of self-destructive behavior in the cause of extremism.
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