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Reinventing Government

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NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | February 17, 1992
The best primer yet on how America's governments can survive the fiscal agonies of the '90s hits the bookstores this week.It's David Osborne and Ted Gaebler's ''Reinventing Government'' (Addison-Wesley). It argues that we need ''an American perestroika'' -- a new way of handling the public enterprise that rejects traditional, top-down, bureaucratic government as decisively as the Russians did their authoritarian state.There's no time to waste, Mr. Osborne told the newly formed National Commission on the State and Local Public Service, meeting recently in Jackson, Mississippi.
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BUSINESS
By Brian Simpson and Brian Simpson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2000
For the most part they've bickered about Medicare, Social Security, big government, school vouchers and whether that "top 1 percent" deserves to get a tax cut. But neither presidential candidate has specifically said much about the American dream of owning a home. Al Gore and George W. Bush want to increase homeownership, but you would have to dig deep into the briefing books to know what their specific homeowning and housing proposals are. "The economy is so good, homeownership is so high, and interest rates are so low, it's a nonissue," said Keith T. Gumbinger, vice president of New Jersey-based HSH Associates, a firm that tracks and analyzes mortgage rates.
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NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | June 1, 1993
Philadelphia. -- If you're wondering what the talk of ''reinventing government'' in America's states and cities is all about, check out this city's recreation department and especially its commissioner of the last 16 months, Michael DiBerardinis.Mr. DiBerardinis was a community activist and organizer for 15 years in Philadelphia's gritty inner-city Kensington and Fishtown neighborhoods before being tapped by incoming Mayor Edward Rendell to take over a thoroughly battered city ''rec department.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - Ever since Al Gore smashed an ashtray on David Letterman's show a few years ago to dramatize what was wrong with the federal bureaucracy, the vice president's "Reinventing Government" initiative has achieved some of its goals - from improving the Social Security Administration's customer service hotline to helping citizens file income taxes online. What it hasn't done, many analysts say, is what Gore continues to claim it has: cut 300,000 federal jobs. Trying to shake the "big spender" label his rival has tried to tag him with, Gore declared this week that, "for eight years now, I've worked to reduce the size of government."
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1998
Ted A. Gaebler, co-author of the book "Reinventing Government," which has influenced politicians from President Clinton on down, is a finalist for the job that would essentially make him mayor of Columbia.Gaebler, 57, of San Rafael, Calif., is one of four candidates for the $120,000 position as president of the Columbia Association (CA), which oversees a $44 million budget and 800 employees.If he gets the job, Gaebler would return to the planned community where he began his career in urban governance almost three decades ago.In 1992, Gaebler and David Osborne of Essex, Mass.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | September 12, 1993
Reinventing government is a popular notion these days. But theplans unveiled by Vice President Gore last week are promises, not reality. Sara Engram is editorial page director of The Evening Sun.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - Ever since Al Gore smashed an ashtray on David Letterman's show a few years ago to dramatize what was wrong with the federal bureaucracy, the vice president's "Reinventing Government" initiative has achieved some of its goals - from improving the Social Security Administration's customer service hotline to helping citizens file income taxes online. What it hasn't done, many analysts say, is what Gore continues to claim it has: cut 300,000 federal jobs. Trying to shake the "big spender" label his rival has tried to tag him with, Gore declared this week that, "for eight years now, I've worked to reduce the size of government."
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | December 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Leaders of federal employee unions had to watch their backs this week as challengers capitalized on the rank-and-file's anger over proposals to cut federal pay and benefits.Yesterday, Robert S. Keener, president of the National Federation of Federal Employees, was ousted, and a regional vice president of American Federation of Government Employees announced he will challenge long-time President John Sturdivant.Under Department of Labor supervision, 700 NFFE delegates voted by mail to return Sheila K. Velazco to the union's highest office.
NEWS
September 8, 1993
At this stage, the best way to assess the Clinton-Gore exercise in "reinventing government" is to regard it as a political exercise in reinventing the national image of this administration. The president and vice president campaigned as "new Democrats" determined to bring their party back to the mainstream and away from the left-liberal tilt that had led to successive election defeats. But since they took their oaths of office last January, they have been very much in an "old Democrats" mode.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | September 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Like beachfront property owners expecting a big storm, federal employee union leaders are taking precautions against Hurricane RE-GO -- as bureaucrats have dubbed the Reinventing Government report Vice President Al Gore will release next week.Union officials will have a private briefing with Mr. Gore tomorrow. The vice president has spent the summer evaluating the federal bureaucracy, and is under increasing pressure to cut workplace and work force expenses and improve services at the same time.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 5, 1999
WASHINGTON John Brodman works on world energy policy for the U.S. government. Clear enough, but then there is his title.Brodman is an associate deputy assistant secretary. And that makes his formal title "associate deputy assistant secretary for international energy policy, trade and investment for the Department of Energy.""Try to put that down on a business card," Brodman said. "Or on one of those registration forms that ask for name and title in a small space."Brodman takes his lengthy title in good humor, but a recent study says the government is giving more people more titles -- at a time when it's supposed to be doing some serious streamlining.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1998
Ted A. Gaebler, co-author of the book "Reinventing Government," which has influenced politicians from President Clinton on down, is a finalist for the job that would essentially make him mayor of Columbia.Gaebler, 57, of San Rafael, Calif., is one of four candidates for the $120,000 position as president of the Columbia Association (CA), which oversees a $44 million budget and 800 employees.If he gets the job, Gaebler would return to the planned community where he began his career in urban governance almost three decades ago.In 1992, Gaebler and David Osborne of Essex, Mass.
NEWS
By MARCIA MYERS and MARCIA MYERS,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
Joseph Kimble settled into an airline seat not long ago and tried to make sense of the emergency exit instructions. On the plastic card before him: an impenetrable 28-point list of federal rules and directions.Kimble took the card home and translated it into five simple sentences. Most passengers probably wouldn't bother, and he fears that could cost someone's life someday.A law professor, Kimble is among a cadre of professionals around the country who have spent years lobbying business and government to throw out gobbledygook and communicate in "plain English" - short sentences, everyday words and no legal or highly technical jargon.
NEWS
June 18, 1997
Q. What do you see as your major accomplishments as vice president?GORE: Oh, I think stewardship of our environmental policy; the reinventing government [initiative] and beginning a process of transformation in the federal bureaucracy that holds out the promise of helping to redeem the promise of self-government; telecommunications reform and the launching of a program to complete the information superhighway and connect every classroom and library to it, and the beginning of a worldwide effort to construct the global information infrastructure; the launching of and early success of the community empowerment program; the crime prevention council and measures related to community policing that are contributing, along with other factors, to four years of crime reduction in a row and the largest one-year drop in [crime in]
NEWS
July 19, 1996
BALTIMORE COUNTY this month begins paying employees to save taxpayers money. The program is called "gainsharing," and apparently it's the coming thing among cash-strapped local governments looking to reward employees with something other than a raise. Gainsharing, in which employees get to pocket part of any savings they come up with, was also one of the recommendations of a recent Howard County report that concluded employees are overpaid and need more incentives to perform better.It's difficult to come down on anything that rewards workers and makes them feel like they have a stake in their place of employment, especially at a time when public workers' morale is in the pits.
NEWS
By Charles Jones | January 20, 1995
Washington -- WHEN PRESIDENT Clinton offered his "Contract With the Middle Class," he contended he favored such a proposal long before Republicans advanced their own initiatives. The president -- evoking memories of the GI Bill of Rights and pledging to shun "politics as usual" -- proposed a "Middle-Class Bill of Rights" that promised targeted tax advantages.Announcing his opposition to "ideas that sound good but aren't paid for," Mr. Clinton expected to reduce government spending and turn "dozens of programs over to states and communities that know how best to solve their own problems."
NEWS
June 18, 1997
Q. What do you see as your major accomplishments as vice president?GORE: Oh, I think stewardship of our environmental policy; the reinventing government [initiative] and beginning a process of transformation in the federal bureaucracy that holds out the promise of helping to redeem the promise of self-government; telecommunications reform and the launching of a program to complete the information superhighway and connect every classroom and library to it, and the beginning of a worldwide effort to construct the global information infrastructure; the launching of and early success of the community empowerment program; the crime prevention council and measures related to community policing that are contributing, along with other factors, to four years of crime reduction in a row and the largest one-year drop in [crime in]
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | October 24, 1993
Health-care reform, NAFTA, "Reinventing Government" -- these are issues that deeply concern you, as an informed American, in the sense that if you read one more word about them, you are going to puke. Nevertheless we intend to address them today, because we are a professional news commentator, and we feel that it is our responsibility, from time to time, to refer to ourselves in the plural.Health Care ReformThis is an important issue, because many Americans are not receiving adequate health care.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- And now, reinventing Clinton.After his party's worst midterm election defeat in nearly a half-century, President Clinton is being forced to do the same thing he often tells Americans they must do in a fast-changing world: retool and retrain for a different job than the one he currently holds.It won't be easy.Mr. Clinton came to office as head of a unified government in Washington, the first in 12 years with Congress and the White House controlled by the same party. Now, with power about to be split again, he must perform a task no Democrat since Harry S. Truman has had to do -- try to win re-election while leading a divided government.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | October 3, 1994
Washington.--The ''Contract with America'' offered up on the Capitol steps last week by Republican House members and candidates makes no bones about the fate of the federal establishment if the Republicans seize control of Congress next month.Government is depicted as the chief culprit for virtually all that ails America. So it's to be chopped down to smaller size with tax cuts, constitutionally mandated balanced budgets, a redone and slimmed-down crime bill, privatized government functions, and term limits on legislators.
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