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By Ken Rosenthal | November 21, 1996
The Albert Belle contract might be the best thing to ever happen to baseball.That might sound preposterous, seeing as how the Chicago White Sox just committed $55 million to a lout.But maybe now the owners will approve a labor agreement, defying Jerry Reinsdorf once and for all.It's all out in the open now, isn't it?Reinsdorf doesn't want to save baseball; he wants to save himself.And his lapdog, Bud Selig, is woefully miscast as commissioner.The owners, of course, are the last ones to discover this.
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SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 15, 1999
Hi, my name is Jerry Reinsdorf. I'm still a little sad, you know. Well, at least that's what I said. And what good is being an owner if you can't fib like the President? Or Pinocchio, for that matter?Truth is, Jan. 14, 1999, was Independence Day for the Chicago Bulls franchise. Thank goodness, we don't have to worry about that Jordan guy anymore.So much fame, so much power, so much money -- too much for one man! So many titles, so many contracts, so many rings to purchase -- too much for one owner!
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SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | August 1, 1997
The man hates baseball. Why won't someone just admit it? Jerry Reinsdorf hates major-league baseball, and he's doing everything in his power to destroy it.Just connect the dots:Reinsdorf was a driving force in the labor dispute. Reinsdorf disrupted the salary structure by giving Albert Belle $55 million. And yesterday, Reinsdorf gutted his team when it was only 3 1/2 games out of first place.To the list of terms previously used to describe the Chicago White Sox owner -- union buster, large-market bully, mind-blowing hypocrite -- make sure you add "quitter."
SPORTS
By JERRY BEMBRY and JERRY BEMBRY,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
CHICAGO -- In 13 illustrious seasons, he carried the Chicago Bulls to six NBA titles. He also served as an ambassador to the NBA, and in the process became a global hero.Yesterday, Michael Jordan said he had had enough.On center court at the United Center, with the floor that hasn't been played on since June laid down and the baskets rolled out, Jordan officially announced his retirement from basketball."Mentally, I'm exhausted. I don't feel I have a challenge," said Jordan, who was joined on the podium by his wife, Juanita.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1998
Jerry Reinsdorf and Jerry Krause, the owner and general manager of the Chicago Bulls, have been criticized daily this season, ripped for having the audacity to consider breaking up a team that has won five championships in the 1990s and is pursuing No. 6.In the process, Phil Jackson has been a sympathetic figure, the ** successful coach being forced out. But if what Reinsdorf said last week is true, Jackson might be the villain of this soap opera.Reinsdorf, who had been silent throughout the season, told the Chicago Tribune last week that he never said he would break up the team, that he would be inclined to invite everybody back if the Bulls win the championship this year, that Michael Jordan has decided to take the summer to decide whether he will return, and that it's Jackson who has made it clear that he does not want to return to the Bulls.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1996
He is an apostle of financial self-control who has single-handedly launched the salary scale of two sports into orbit with blockbuster deals. He views organized labor as a necessary bulwark against sweatshops, but is the chief antagonist of the baseball players union.Jerry Reinsdorf, the owner of the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls, will get the credit if Major League Baseball owners approve a tentative labor agreement today at their meeting in Chicago.Why not? He was blamed for scuttling the same deal on Nov. 6.He is, in the eyes of the Major League Baseball Players Association, a leader of a band of hard-liners who provoked a bitter strike in 1994 and have prevented a settlement since.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1996
Major-league owners apparently will vote again Tuesday on the proposed labor settlement that was rejected two weeks ago, and there are indications that the outcome might be different this time.Sources close to the negotiations indicate that there may be enough votes to approve the deal by the required 75 percent majority at a hastily arranged owners meeting in Chicago, though ownership power-broker Jerry Reinsdorf and an unlikely ally -- Orioles owner Peter Angelos -- still feel the settlement is not in the best interests of the industry.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 28, 1997
CHICAGO -- Michael Jordan is back.Was there any doubt?During a brief meeting in Las Vegas late Tuesday involving Jordan, agent David Falk and Bulls chairman Jerry Reinsdorf, Jordan agreed to a new one-year contract.Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Jordan is believed to have been offered at least $36 million -- a 20-percent raise over last season. The contract is to be signed next week when Jordan returns from Las Vegas, where he is conducting a fantasy basketball camp.Both sides remained relatively quiet about the contract yesterday; their brief statements didn't address whether the coming season would be Jordan's final one with the Bulls.
SPORTS
By Newsday | March 14, 1995
DEERFIELD, Ill. -- The question isn't whether Michael Jordan wants to play basketball again. He does. Jordan just wants assurances that he can do it on his terms.Therefore, his return hinges on his one-on-one contest with Chicago Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf.According to sources, Jordan wants more money for Scottie Pippen, more money for himself, and a commitment from Bulls management that it will do everything possible to sign a free agent this summer -- a free agent such as the New York Knicks' Anthony Mason.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | June 9, 1998
CHICAGO -- Maybe the two Jerrys will determine that Phil Jackson directed one of Dennis Rodman's fines to his wife's favorite charity.That charge backfired on a certain baseball owner, you say?Well, it might be the two Jerrys' only hope.Reinsdorf, the Chicago Bulls' owner, and Krause, their basketball VP, want to break up the '90s equivalent of the Beatles, the last great dynasty in sports.Both are about to get what they deserve.The Bulls appear ready to win their sixth NBA title, and when they do, the Second City is going to turn into Squirm City for their supposed braintrust.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1998
It appears that if the Chicago Bulls win another title, team chairman Jerry Reinsdorf will roll out the red carpet and welcome back all the key principals. The question is will they want to return? During an interview with NBC during halftime of Friday's Game 5 of the NBA Finals, Reinsdorf said he does not want to be the person to break up the Bulls."We hope that this is not the end of this run," Reinsdorf said. "Of course, it's not totally up to me. Michael, Scottie and seven other players are free agents.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | June 9, 1998
CHICAGO -- Maybe the two Jerrys will determine that Phil Jackson directed one of Dennis Rodman's fines to his wife's favorite charity.That charge backfired on a certain baseball owner, you say?Well, it might be the two Jerrys' only hope.Reinsdorf, the Chicago Bulls' owner, and Krause, their basketball VP, want to break up the '90s equivalent of the Beatles, the last great dynasty in sports.Both are about to get what they deserve.The Bulls appear ready to win their sixth NBA title, and when they do, the Second City is going to turn into Squirm City for their supposed braintrust.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1998
Jerry Reinsdorf and Jerry Krause, the owner and general manager of the Chicago Bulls, have been criticized daily this season, ripped for having the audacity to consider breaking up a team that has won five championships in the 1990s and is pursuing No. 6.In the process, Phil Jackson has been a sympathetic figure, the ** successful coach being forced out. But if what Reinsdorf said last week is true, Jackson might be the villain of this soap opera.Reinsdorf, who had been silent throughout the season, told the Chicago Tribune last week that he never said he would break up the team, that he would be inclined to invite everybody back if the Bulls win the championship this year, that Michael Jordan has decided to take the summer to decide whether he will return, and that it's Jackson who has made it clear that he does not want to return to the Bulls.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 28, 1997
CHICAGO -- Michael Jordan is back.Was there any doubt?During a brief meeting in Las Vegas late Tuesday involving Jordan, agent David Falk and Bulls chairman Jerry Reinsdorf, Jordan agreed to a new one-year contract.Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Jordan is believed to have been offered at least $36 million -- a 20-percent raise over last season. The contract is to be signed next week when Jordan returns from Las Vegas, where he is conducting a fantasy basketball camp.Both sides remained relatively quiet about the contract yesterday; their brief statements didn't address whether the coming season would be Jordan's final one with the Bulls.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1997
OAKLAND, Calif. -- The smoke was starting to clear after a burst of trading activity on Thursday night, but Orioles assistant general manager Kevin Malone still was a little hot under the collar.The Orioles had allowed the trading deadline to pass without a major pitching acquisition, but that wasn't the reason for Malone's dismay. He was still steamed about the controversial deal that was pulled off earlier in the day by the Chicago White Sox -- a deal Malone thinks could shake Major League Baseball all the way to its fan base.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | August 1, 1997
The man hates baseball. Why won't someone just admit it? Jerry Reinsdorf hates major-league baseball, and he's doing everything in his power to destroy it.Just connect the dots:Reinsdorf was a driving force in the labor dispute. Reinsdorf disrupted the salary structure by giving Albert Belle $55 million. And yesterday, Reinsdorf gutted his team when it was only 3 1/2 games out of first place.To the list of terms previously used to describe the Chicago White Sox owner -- union buster, large-market bully, mind-blowing hypocrite -- make sure you add "quitter."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | January 30, 1994
There they go again. Chicago White Sox pitcher Jack McDowell is feuding with owner Jerry Reinsdorf, which only makes it more likely that McDowell will either be traded in the next few months or will leave the club when he becomes eligible for free agency after the season.McDowell filed for a record salary of $6.5 million in arbitration, sparking the latest round of unpleasantness in a personality conflict that dates to his earliest contract negotiations with the club. The White Sox offered him a $5.3 million salary in arbitration and a three-year deal worth $17 million, but there doesn't appear to be any productive negotiating going on."
SPORTS
By JERRY BEMBRY and JERRY BEMBRY,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
CHICAGO -- In 13 illustrious seasons, he carried the Chicago Bulls to six NBA titles. He also served as an ambassador to the NBA, and in the process became a global hero.Yesterday, Michael Jordan said he had had enough.On center court at the United Center, with the floor that hasn't been played on since June laid down and the baskets rolled out, Jordan officially announced his retirement from basketball."Mentally, I'm exhausted. I don't feel I have a challenge," said Jordan, who was joined on the podium by his wife, Juanita.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1996
He is an apostle of financial self-control who has single-handedly launched the salary scale of two sports into orbit with blockbuster deals. He views organized labor as a necessary bulwark against sweatshops, but is the chief antagonist of the baseball players union.Jerry Reinsdorf, the owner of the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls, will get the credit if Major League Baseball owners approve a tentative labor agreement today at their meeting in Chicago.Why not? He was blamed for scuttling the same deal on Nov. 6.He is, in the eyes of the Major League Baseball Players Association, a leader of a band of hard-liners who provoked a bitter strike in 1994 and have prevented a settlement since.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1996
Last winter, I received a nice letter from a fan asking if we might stop writing about money matters in baseball during the off-season, and write more about the game.Sounds great, but it's impossible. Everything done in the major leagues is predicated on money or lack thereof, and Albert Belle's $55 million contract will make all teams more diligent about how they spend their dollars. In this strange world created by former union leader Marvin Miller (who began the salary spiral) and Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf (who is responsible for signing Belle and altering baseball's salary structure dramatically)
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