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By Yolanda Garfield | November 18, 1990
The Fort Building at the corner of Fort and Light streets ha seen some changes since it was built as a post office at the turn of the century. For a while it was a bowling alley, thanks to its 100-foot length. Then it became a hardware store. Painted green and abandoned, it seemed to promise no aesthetic hope for anyone foolish enough to attempt renovation.Today, the Fort Building has been reincarnated as an attractive, rather unusual apartment building containing three spacious units. The success of the project is due in large part to the collaborative design effort between owners Bryan Akman and Steve Wilhide, and project contractor Bill Earley, all of the Light Street Group.
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By Bob Allen | September 1, 2012
John Tokar, owner of Vintage Restorations Limited, in Union Bridge, started tinkering with British cars in 1969 when he was a teen in Bayonne, N.J., and his uncle sold him a 1959 Hillman Minx for $50. "It needed a clutch, so I got involved in working on it and I never stopped," the 61-year-old New Jersey native recalled, pointing to a framed photo of his office wall of himself and that '59 Hillman. "That car was what got me started, then I went to Triumphs, and now my specialty is MGs, which is mostly what I do these days," he said, pointing to another photo, this one of himself a few years later, a college student standing next to a vintage Triumph Spitfire.
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By Laura Lippman and By Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | October 21, 2001
The Other Adonis, by Frank Deford. Sourcebooks. 331 pages. $24. The average Baltimorean -- and I like to think I am very much the average Baltimorean -- probably knows enough about local-boy-made-good Frank Deford to provide a thumbnail sketch. Gilman grad, one-time setter of duckpins, Evening Sun copy boy who became best known for his sportswriting. A weekly commentator on National Public Radio, but also a writer of some breadth -- several novels and a memoir, about the death of his daughter from cystic fibrosis.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Turan and Kenneth Turan,Tribune newspapers | October 9, 2009
"Unmistaken Child" does more than take you inside a closed culture in an almost unreachable part of the world. It bears witness to a strange and mysterious process: the search for the childhood reincarnation of a recently deceased and revered Tibetan master. Its privileged glimpse deep into unfamiliar spiritual territory has the strength of revelation. This journey began for writer-director Nati Baratz in 2002, when he met a monk named Tenzin Zopa at the Kopan Monastery in Nepal and realized that the young man had been delegated by the Dalai Lama to find the reincarnation of the legendary Geshe Lama Konchog, who had died the year before at the age of 84. Zopa was not chosen for his task by accident.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | July 22, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- "Eckankar: the ancient science of soul-travel."A bumper sticker with that slogan attracted Westminster resident Jim Riddle to the Eckankar religion in 1972, and the slogan continues to bring people who are interested in reincarnation and believing that all actions have a spiritual impact on daily life.The teachings, which Eckists say have been around for centuries, were written down by Paul Twitchell in the mid-1960s.They include belief that dreams are God's tool for telling people about themselves, their past lives and the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 25, 1993
BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA(Columbia TriStar, rated R, 1992)What is it about the Dracula story that continues to fascinate audiences?There are no moral or ethical questions posed as in the equally overproduced Frankenstein saga.Do women really see eternal life in a hellish environment with a suave bloodsucking bat as a romantic concept?Apparently so, because it wasn't just teen-age boys -- the primary horror-film demographic -- that catapulted this film to box office earnings of more than $75 million last fall.
NEWS
October 12, 1995
In yesterday's Today section, an incorrect phone number was given for this weekend's conference on near-death and reincarnation at the Sheraton Hotel in Towson. The correct phone number is (410) 825-7521.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
July 22, 1995
Virginia Tighe Morrow, 72, whose revelation under hypnosis of a past life as a 19th century Irishwoman sparked a 1950s debate over reincarnation and served as the basis for the book and subsequent movie titled "The Search for Bridey Murphy," died July 12 in her suburban Denver home, family members said Thursday. She was married to automobile dealer Hugh Tighe when she met the book's author, Morey Bernstein, at a party. Mr. Bernstein, a local businessman interested in hypnosis and reincarnation, offered to hypnotize her to relieve her allergies.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Turan and Kenneth Turan,Tribune newspapers | October 9, 2009
"Unmistaken Child" does more than take you inside a closed culture in an almost unreachable part of the world. It bears witness to a strange and mysterious process: the search for the childhood reincarnation of a recently deceased and revered Tibetan master. Its privileged glimpse deep into unfamiliar spiritual territory has the strength of revelation. This journey began for writer-director Nati Baratz in 2002, when he met a monk named Tenzin Zopa at the Kopan Monastery in Nepal and realized that the young man had been delegated by the Dalai Lama to find the reincarnation of the legendary Geshe Lama Konchog, who had died the year before at the age of 84. Zopa was not chosen for his task by accident.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 13, 1992
What happens to us when we die? If there is an afterlife, are we still recognizably ourselves? Or, as some believe, do we come back, reincarnated as someone or something else?For the answers to these and all your other questions about the Great Beyond, check your daily horoscope.No, wait! I'm just kidding, of course. If there were easy answers that satisfied everybody, we wouldn't need churches, synagogues, mosques, astrology, channeling, harmonic convergences -- or even this column!As it is, we mortals are given life, along with a brain to contemplate its meaning, a soul to make us care and the gifts of love and laughter to make it all worthwhile.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | July 31, 2009
Almost 10 percent of interstate bus operators who have their federal permits revoked for safety violations are able to quickly resume business by "reincarnating" themselves as new companies, according to federal government watchdogs. In a Government Accountability Office report released Thursday, investigators reported that 20 of the 220 motor coach operators ordered to stop service by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Association in 2007 and 2008 remained on the road by re-registering - sometimes under the same name as the company that was barred.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | September 9, 2006
They were back at Bates High School, loitering in the halls without a pass, snacking outside without permission and gabbing without fear of being sent to the vice principal's office. Five, six, even seven decades after graduating, former students celebrated yesterday the historic school's reincarnation as the $27 million Wiley H. Bates Heritage Park, with its senior center, senior apartments, legacy center and Boys and Girls Club. "It made me who I am. It's a lasting connection," said Jolinda Brooks Gaither, Class of 1966.
FEATURES
By Jackie Loohauis and Jackie Loohauis,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 6, 2004
Bing and Bob. Butch and The Kid. Holmes and Watson. Dracula and Van Helsing. They're all famous pop culture pairings that have survived the ages, but only that last duo has the scent of the supernatural about it. In a saga that has caused flaps during three centuries, usually the vampire gets top billing. But now the vampire slayer stars in his own film - Van Helsing, which opens tomorrow - proving that the Dr. Watson of the Undead deserves another look. Because without Abraham Van Helsing, Dracula would be just another fanged footnote in horror history.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2003
When Stephen Smith Sr.'s Central Air Conditioning Contractors Inc. of Columbia was acquired by national building services company Encompass Services Corp. in 1998, it seemed another locally headquartered company had disappeared. But with Encompass' November filing for bankruptcy reorganization, which has forced the giant to shed much of its business, a new company - formed by Stephen Smith Jr. - has emerged to dig into some of what the Houston-based corporation is leaving behind locally.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alec MacGillis and By Alec MacGillis,Sun Staff | November 24, 2002
Ha Jin, who came to the United States to study in 1985 and remained here after the Tiananmen Square massacre, won the National Book Award and great praise for his previous book, Waiting. Now comes The Crazed (Pantheon, 352 pages, $24), his tale about a literature professor at a provincial Chinese university who after suffering a stroke lets loose bitter rants about his life under the Communist regime. Set in 1989, The Crazed is partly a reckoning with the massacre, with the gathering protests in Beijing serving as the backdrop to Professor Yang's ravings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and By Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | October 21, 2001
The Other Adonis, by Frank Deford. Sourcebooks. 331 pages. $24. The average Baltimorean -- and I like to think I am very much the average Baltimorean -- probably knows enough about local-boy-made-good Frank Deford to provide a thumbnail sketch. Gilman grad, one-time setter of duckpins, Evening Sun copy boy who became best known for his sportswriting. A weekly commentator on National Public Radio, but also a writer of some breadth -- several novels and a memoir, about the death of his daughter from cystic fibrosis.
NEWS
July 27, 1999
WOODSTOCK'S third reincarnation was a party that ended with a riot. The music festival at the former Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome, N.Y., did not resemble the Age of Aquarius. Nor did anyone expect it would.The original Woodstock has, the truth be told, been sentimentalized beyond reality. The concert at Max Yasgur's farm featured some of rock music's biggest stars -- Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Joan Baez. The 350,000 youths who attended the event -- and the millions who didn't, but now act as if they did -- genuinely believed their presence and behavior at that concert changed America.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2001
I saw my first "Nunsense" at Chesapeake Music Hall in January last year, and a repeat in November, as part of the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum's subscription series. Now, with the music hall's "Nunsense II, The Second Coming," these nuns have become a habit with me. Master punster, playwright, composer-lyricist Dan Goggin introduced "Nunsense" in 1985. Its success - playing almost constantly in New York and on the road - persuaded him to write the sequel, first produced in 1993.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2000
The Orioles were so convinced that catcher Brook Fordyce wouldn't arrive at Camden Yards for yesterday's game, they had Willie Morales drive four hours from Norfolk, Va. That's where Triple-A Rochester was playing. That's where Morales would be returning. Fordyce, acquired from the Chicago White Sox on Saturday night, not only made the trip from Los Angeles, but he also started against Cleveland Indians left-hander Chuck Finley. Talk about a good first impression. "It surprised me. We didn't expect him, given his location, until sometime tonight," said manager Mike Hargrove.
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