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Reimbursement

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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 8, 1993
Westminster City Council President William F. Haifley plans to propose tonight that the city reimburse council members who spend their own money on government business.Mr. Haifley also plans to ask his colleagues to consider writing rules to govern reimbursement both for elected officials and for city employees, who currently are repaid for expenses on government business, but without a formal policy.The council will meet at 7 p.m. at City Hall."At the present time, the city doesn't have any rules and regulations on what types of expenses can be reimbursed," Mr. Haifley said.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Custom sports uniform provider Sports55 Inc. has reached a settlement with the state over allegations that it failed to fulfill youth team uniform orders or delivered them late, the Maryland Attorney General's office said. The state Consumer Protection Division reached the settlement with Sports55 and affiliated enterprises Teamuniforms123 LLC and Dyesubsports LLC, all based in Anne Arundel County, and two owners, Kelly Burke and John Eberl, the Attorney General's office said. "Dozens of adult and youth league teams were left in the lurch when this company failed to promptly deliver the uniforms they ordered and paid for," Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement.
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NEWS
March 7, 1993
A Westminster city government committee plans to recommend that the City Council reimburse its members for car and other expenses incurred on city business.The recommendation is scheduled for consideration at tomorrow's City Council meeting at 7 p.m. in City Hall.If the council approves the recommendation, elected officials will be reimbursed for mileage at 28 cents a mile, 7 cents a mile more than city employees currently receive for using their cars on government business.Councilman Stephen R. Chapin Sr., the finance committee chairman, would approve requests for compensation for expenses.
FEATURES
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Home improvement projects can easily cost tens of thousands of dollars, which means the stakes are high if something goes wrong. And things do. Maryland regulators received more than 4,400 complaints about home improvement contractors in the last three fiscal years, ranging from disputes about the scope of the project to no work performed at all. The Maryland Home Improvement Commission, which offers a program where homeowners can be reimbursed some...
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1994
State officials might reimburse Carroll County for more than $2.5 million spent to build Piney Ridge Elementary, county public school Superintendent R. Edward Shilling told the commissioners yesterday.County officials have been trying for three years to get state reimbursement for the elementary school, which opened in 1991. Most schools are built using 65 percent state money and 35 percent county money, but Piney Ridge was built entirely with county money."I think there is a real possibility we might get reimbursed for Piney Ridge Elementary," Mr. Shilling said during the public school capital budget hearing with the commissioners for fiscal 1995.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
School bus contractors are upset that the Board of Education has given itself the option to reduce their pay next year.Last week's unanimous decision allows the board to reduce contractors' rate of reimbursement if the school system finds itself in a budget crunch. Starting next year, contractors will have to sign an agreement with a provision that allows the board such power.Contractors called the decision unfair."This is the only business that these contractors have," said Thomas M. Meachum, lawyer for the School Bus Contractors Association.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1998
If Carroll doesn't get a $2 million reimbursement from the state for construction work at Sandymount Elementary School, the county will have to trim its proposed capital budget, officials learned last night.State reimbursement early in May is "critical for local funding," Vernon Smith, director of school support services, told the County Commissioners last night at a hearing on the school board's proposed $43.7 million capital budget for fiscal 1999.A repair project at Eldersburg Elementary School and a proposed media center addition at Sykesville Middle School would be in jeopardy, Smith said, as would a new roof planned for North Carroll High School.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
On an evening when they decided to pay more than $7 million to preserve farmland and to borrow $37 million to upgrade a sewer plant, Harford County Council members had their most heated debate about an issue that has cost the county $3,500 since 1990.The argument Tuesday night centered on whether the county should keep a law that requires it to reimburse farmers for livestock killed by dogs or other predators.All seven council members seemed to agree that the principle -- not money -- was the issue.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 4, 1996
"When you get a raise, you owe income taxes, but try to get extra money tax free via an expense reimbursement account instead."Key: Most employees pay out-of-pocket expenses their employers won't reimburse, but reimbursements are tax free. So take your money through an expense account, not salary, and keep more after taxes." (Tax Hotline.)LOCAL LAURELS: "McCormick Renews Its Taste For Growth." (Headline of favorable article in Smart Money, October.)Legg Mason's latest "Buy List" includes Potomac Electric Power.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | November 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Parents of disabled children gained wider options from the Supreme Court yesterday to send their children to private schools and get states to pay some or all of the tuition.In a unanimous decision that appears sure to enhance the free choice of parents about schooling for children who need special services, the court ruled that they cannot be denied reimbursement for private school costs just because they choose a school not approved by state and local educators.But the court left federal judges with discretion to approve reimbursement of less than full tuition costs if the judge finds fTC that "the cost of private education was unreasonable."
HEALTH
By John Fritze and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Maryland's top health official told a congressional panel in Washington on Thursday that IT contractors were to blame for the state's troubled rollout of the Affordable Care Act and suggested that the state may reimburse the federal government if it can claw back money from those companies. Though Maryland Health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein has repeatedly testified in Annapolis about the launch of the glitch-prone website, the hearing by a subcommittee of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee was the first time he has publicly addressed questions from federal lawmakers about the exchange.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Becoming certified to be a card dealer in Maryland can be expensive, but Maryland Live Casino is now offering an incentive for those willing to make the investment. Between now and Sept. 1, the Anne Arundel casino will reimburse tuition fees for new hires who complete the certification process through Anne Arundel Community College's "dealer school. " Informational sessions are being offered at the community college on Monday, Wednesday and Friday of next week. A number of introduction to table games courses, which cost $197, are being offered between now and May, at the community college's Arundel Mills and Marley Station campuses.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Carroll Hospital Center has begun what it calls an "aggressive" search for hospital partners, saying it's open to all options, including the possibility of merging with another institution. The 193-bed hospital has operated independently for its entire 53-year existence and is profitable, but CEO John Sernulka said changes in health care will put financial pressure on small hospitals like his in the near future. "Reimbursement will continue to tighten," Sernulka said. "There will be less and less dollars pumped into the health care system.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
A gubernatorial hopeful has offered to pay the phone bills of the Seattle pottery store that fielded hundreds of wayward calls from people stuck in Maryland's broken health exchange. After The Baltimore Sun reported that the state's insurance website erroneously listed the toll-free number of a West Coast specialty kiln business instead of the state call center, Republican David Craig said Monday he hopes to reimburse the business out of his personal checking account. "The state should have taken the lead on this," said Craig, the Harford County executive.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | January 16, 2014
Republican gubernatorial hopeful Charles Lollar's supporters often say that he is "the only candidate that can win," but his campaign finance report raises more questions than answers. (Disclosure: Red Maryland's editors have unanimously endorsed Larry Hogan for governor.) Lollar's gubernatorial campaign raised a paltry $65,329.67 during the last year, and he has only $5,731.35 available cash-on-hand according to the filings due to the Board of Elections yesterday. That's not the interesting part.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 24, 2013
Health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein joined with John Colmers, chair of the state's hospital rate-setting panel, at a forum Thursday night at The Baltimore Sun to discuss a plan that will change the way hospitals do business. The plan would tie hospital spending to the state economy and virtually eliminate a reimbursement model based on the volume of hospital admissions that has been in place for nearly four decades. It would instead reward hospitals for quality of care and keeping patients healthy.
NEWS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | October 24, 2005
BALTIMORE (AP) - A former state official who was cleared of allegations he misused (m) millions of dollars in federal grants now wants the state to pay his legal bills. The State Attorney General's office tells W-B-A-L radio that Stephen Amos wants state taxpayers to give him more than 193-thousnd dollars to cover his legal costs. Amos headed the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention under former Lieutenant Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend. He had been indicted for mishandling public money, but the charges were dismissed in January.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
Howard County residents escaped Tropical Storm Isabel's damaging floods, but county officials estimate they spent $900,310 for emergency overtime, equipment rentals and to repair road damage. Raquel Sanudo, Howard's chief administrative officer, said the county is trying to determine how much of the expense is eligible for reimbursement through the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Maryland was declared a disaster area by President Bush the day after the Sept. 18 storm, meaning the county can recoup up to 75 percent of eligible costs.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Maryland health officials on Friday turned over to the federal government a plan that would overhaul how hospitals are paid for treating patients to promote lower admissions and better care. The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene plan would replace a model in which hospitals are reimbursed for care based on numbers of hospital admissions with one that instead ties that spending to the state economy. The plan would allow the state to preserve a unique setup in which Maryland officials set generally uniform rates for hospital charges.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
A federal judge on Tuesday denied a bid by poultry producer Perdue and an Eastern Shore farmer to make the Waterkeeper Alliance pay more than $3 million in attorneys' fees for its failed lawsuit alleging that the company and its contract grower were polluting a Chesapeake Bay tributary. Judge William M. Nickerson concluded that while he believed the New York-based environmental group had mishandled preparation of its case, that did not merit the rare sanction of making the losing alliance pay the other side's attorneys.
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