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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1994
Berlin -- In his long, eccentric career of making bold visual statements to a skeptical public, the artist known as Christo has racked up some impressive accomplishments.He surrounded entire islands with collars of pink fabric in Miami's Biscayne Bay, stretched a high white fence across miles of barren California hills, cloaked a Paris bridge in cloth, and spiked Japanese rice paddies with hundreds of huge blue umbrellas.But today Christo faces perhaps his toughest challenge yet: winning over the stodgy, gray parliament, the Bundestag, to the cause of art for art's sake.
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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Knight-Ridder NewspapersBerlin Bureau of The Sun | June 20, 1995
Berlin -- When tourist Chong Su of Beijing prepared for his latest visit to Berlin, he made sure the sightseeing agenda included a stop at the gray, hulking Reichstag building. What better symbol of the city's long march through empire and infamy, he figured, than Germany's once and future parliament building, with its bullet scars and weighty architecture.But when Mr. Chong and two friends arrived yesterday at the vast lawn of the Reichstag, they were dismayed to find some sort of construction work going on.Not only was the building closed, but workers had covered the front entrance with a huge silver dropcloth, and were preparing to cover other sections as well.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | January 7, 1993
BERLIN -- Christo, the avant-garde artist who has wrapped everything from Florida islands to the Pont Neuf bridge in Paris, will launch today his last campaign to shroud the revered Reichstag parliament building here in about a million square feet of silver-colored fabric."
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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1994
Berlin -- In his long, eccentric career of making bold visual statements to a skeptical public, the artist known as Christo has racked up some impressive accomplishments.He surrounded entire islands with collars of pink fabric in Miami's Biscayne Bay, stretched a high white fence across miles of barren California hills, cloaked a Paris bridge in cloth, and spiked Japanese rice paddies with hundreds of huge blue umbrellas.But today Christo faces perhaps his toughest challenge yet: winning over the stodgy, gray parliament, the Bundestag, to the cause of art for art's sake.
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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Knight-Ridder NewspapersBerlin Bureau of The Sun | June 20, 1995
Berlin -- When tourist Chong Su of Beijing prepared for his latest visit to Berlin, he made sure the sightseeing agenda included a stop at the gray, hulking Reichstag building. What better symbol of the city's long march through empire and infamy, he figured, than Germany's once and future parliament building, with its bullet scars and weighty architecture.But when Mr. Chong and two friends arrived yesterday at the vast lawn of the Reichstag, they were dismayed to find some sort of construction work going on.Not only was the building closed, but workers had covered the front entrance with a huge silver dropcloth, and were preparing to cover other sections as well.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | March 18, 1993
BERLIN -- The Germans have picked for their new federal government center here a clear, clean, urbane, non-monumental design that binds together east and west Berlin and -- symbolically -- the nation.The winning proposal for this "parliamentary quarter" could almost be called modest -- if it didn't sprawl over about 153 acres on both sides of a loop in the Spree River and bring together major branches of the German government."My goal was to avoid everything too strange or monumental," said Axel Schultes, the Berlin architect who recently won the international Spreebogen competition with his proposal for the site.
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By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1990
BERLIN -- United Germany held yesterday its first parliamentary session at the Reichstag since the 1933 fire that once destroyed democracy here, with political party leaders pledging to overcome Germany's brief, troubled history as a united country.Though yesterday's speeches held no shortage of infighting over the details of unification, party leaders appeared impressed with the enormous challenge of the work ahead of them and called for solidarity in tackling the job.Chancellor Helmut Kohl said his government would be "marked by an awareness of German history in all its aspects."
NEWS
May 2, 1999
This is an excerpt of a Providence (R.I.) Journal editorial published Wednesday.AFTER their country was reunited in 1990, the Germans voted to move their capital from Bonn, a sleepy university town in the Rhineland, back to Berlin, the nation's capital between Germany's first unification, in 1871, and the end of World War II.Now, as the old Reichstag building, newly burnished and refurbished by the British architect Sir Norman Foster, is reopened, the...
NEWS
October 9, 1997
Hadassah Rosensaft,85, a Polish Holocaust survivor who is credited with helping save hundreds of Jewish inmates at Auschwitz and who testified against the concentration camp's commandants, died in New York on Friday of liver failure. Her liver disease was caused by malaria and hepatitis she contracted at Auschwitz, said her son Menachem.Aware that sick inmates often were ordered to the gas chambers at Auschwitz, Dr. Rosensaft, a dentist, sent them out of the infirmary and told camp officials they were healthy.
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By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1997
For more than 50 years, the center of Berlin has been a theme park of 20th-century infamy.Look down the wide boulevard of Unter den Linden and you see the path where Adolf Hitler's legions goose-stepped through their grandest parades. Look up at the bronze horses atop the Brandenburg Gate and you see a monument that was the centerpiece of the Cold War's most despised and important boundary.Gaze a block or so to the north and you can't miss the hulk of the Reichstag, the parliamentary building abused by Hitler for his own devices in 1933, then seized upon by photographers at the end of World War II as it stood in ruins, the ultimate symbol of an empire tossed upon the scrap heap.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | March 18, 1993
BERLIN -- The Germans have picked for their new federal government center here a clear, clean, urbane, non-monumental design that binds together east and west Berlin and -- symbolically -- the nation.The winning proposal for this "parliamentary quarter" could almost be called modest -- if it didn't sprawl over about 153 acres on both sides of a loop in the Spree River and bring together major branches of the German government."My goal was to avoid everything too strange or monumental," said Axel Schultes, the Berlin architect who recently won the international Spreebogen competition with his proposal for the site.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | January 7, 1993
BERLIN -- Christo, the avant-garde artist who has wrapped everything from Florida islands to the Pont Neuf bridge in Paris, will launch today his last campaign to shroud the revered Reichstag parliament building here in about a million square feet of silver-colored fabric."
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1990
BERLIN -- United Germany held yesterday its first parliamentary session at the Reichstag since the 1933 fire that once destroyed democracy here, with political party leaders pledging to overcome Germany's brief, troubled history as a united country.Though yesterday's speeches held no shortage of infighting over the details of unification, party leaders appeared impressed with the enormous challenge of the work ahead of them and called for solidarity in tackling the job.Chancellor Helmut Kohl said his government would be "marked by an awareness of German history in all its aspects."
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 4, 1990
BERLIN -- Hundreds of thousands of Germans spent their first day in this restored capital strolling from Alexanderplatz to the Reichstag yesterday, savoring the absence of border guards and the knowledge that Berlin was whole once again.This famous stretch, which includes the wide Unter den Linden boulevard and the Brandenburg Gate in the East and the Reichstag in the West, became one long street fair of memorabilia hawkers, food stands and all kinds of music. African, Gypsy, disco and classical music, along with German beer hall tunes, filled the streets.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | October 25, 1999
PARIS -- The account of Pope Pius XII's career set out in John Cornwell's new biography, sensationally titled "Hitler's Pope: The Secret History of Pius XII," raises again the problem of how to understand the past when the "relevant" past means next to nothing to readers today.The promotion of Mr. Cornwell's book focuses on its accusation that Pius XII was anti-Semitic. This is, in fact, the least interesting thing Mr. Cornwell has to say.After all, nearly all the secular notables of the period, including Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt, were in one way or another anti-Semitic.
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