Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRehnquist
IN THE NEWS

Rehnquist

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 26, 1991
The 1991-1992 term of the Supreme Court is the sixth under Chief Justice William Rehnquist. The court has changed a bit but not as much as some expected, judging from the Harvard Law Review's annual study of the term.The statistics of the 1990-1991 term were bound to be different from those of Chief Justice Warren Burger's last term, 1985-1986, because the personalities on the court, the times and the issues are different.When Mr. Rehnquist was promoted from associate justice to chief justice in 1986, he was replaced by Antonin Scalia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | January 20, 2006
As a loyal member - well, as a member - of the District of Columbia bar, I am aware of the tension between advocacy and honesty. But until the recent controversies over Supreme Court nominees, I was unaware of the scope and depth of my professional obligation to avoid telling the truth. It apparently spans an entire career in the law. Suppose you start your career as a Supreme Court law clerk. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. clerked for his predecessor, William H. Rehnquist, who had clerked for Justice Robert H. Jackson.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Harvey Rishikof | August 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is ending his judicial career very much like the way he began. When Mr. Rehnquist first joined the court, he marked his early years with a series of solo dissents that earned him the nickname of the "Lone Ranger." His clerks even presented him with a Lone Ranger doll that he placed on his mantle in his chambers. From the beginning, he exhibited a strong independent streak and a commitment to follow his own judicial philosophy.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,Sun reporter | September 19, 2005
WASHINGTON: Judge John G. Roberts Jr., who gave away little during four days of Senate testimony last week, has put Democrats in a quandary. Should they oppose a Supreme Court nominee they can't stop? Or vote for a conservative jurist whose true intentions seem impossible to read? Roberts now presents a different dilemma for Democrats than he did after he was tapped to replace retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor in July. The death of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, whose seat Roberts would take, means President Bush gets another Supreme Court nomination this fall.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who has thyroid cancer, developed a fever yesterday and was taken to a Virginia hospital "for evaluation," a Supreme Court spokesman said. He was allowed to go home after undergoing tests at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, said spokesman Ed Turner. It was the second time this summer that the 80-year chief justice has gone to the hospital complaining of a fever. In mid-July, he was hospitalized for two days for what officials described as observation and tests.
NEWS
By Mark A. Graber | July 31, 2005
WILLIAM H. REHNQUIST remains on the federal bench in large part because his fellow citizens emphatically reject the chief justice's fundamental values. Most Americans believe that decent societies do not fire cancer patients who can perform their jobs with a little assistance. Justice Rehnquist disagrees. His previous opinions insist that state governments remain constitutionally free to cashier the ill and disabled whenever their termination might promote government efficiency. If these were our nation's basic principles, surely an overwhelming consensus would demand the resignation or impeachment of a federal justice who, because of cancer, does not attend court regularly, no longer writes his fair share of opinions and pens weak opinions when he does write.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and David Folkenflik and Lyle Denniston and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The immunity deal that Monica S. Lewinsky signed July 28 -- a standard arrangement if it had been made in an ordinary criminal case -- suddenly became the center of a roiling new constitutional controversy yesterday.That controversy promptly landed in the lap of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.It was put there by a Democratic senator sympathetic to the president, Tom Harkin of Iowa, asking Rehnquist to act, not as the head of the Supreme Court but as the presiding officer of the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton.
NEWS
By David M. O'Brien | January 12, 1999
AMONG the ironies surrounding the Senate's impeachment trial of President Clinton is that this political trial of the century is presided over by one of the most partisan of Supreme Court chief justices, William H. Rehnquist. Because justices are supposed to be removed from politics, the fact that Mr. Rehnquist has hovered on the sidelines of this controversy all along is often overlooked.Yet, Mr. Rehnquist had a hand in numerous decisions now culminating in the Senate's trial. In 1988, he wrote the Supreme Court's opinion upholding the constitutionality of independent counsels.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is urging Congress to keep the federal court system out of a raging partisan spending debate over the 2000 Census.Funding for the federal judiciary and departments of Commerce, State and Justice is contained in the same appropriations bill.But because the Commerce Department is carrying out the controversial 2000 Census, Congress gave itself until June 15 to resolve its differences and pass the appropriations bill for those departments.After June 15, the judiciary and the three Cabinet departments will receive no federal funds unless a bill is passed.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist said in a statement to be released today that judges must be protected from political threats, including from conservative Republicans who believe "judicial activists" should be impeached and removed from office. The public, the media and politicians certainly are free to criticize judges, Rehnquist said, but politicians cross the line when they try to punish or impeach judges for decisions they do not agree with. "The Constitution protects judicial independence not to benefit judges, but to promote the rule of law: Judges are expected to administer the law fairly, without regard to public reaction," the ailing chief justice said in his traditional year-end report on the federal courts.
NEWS
By Evan P. Schultz | September 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - In order to understand the stakes of the Supreme Court nomination hearings this week, one need look no further than New Orleans. Because by now it should be clear that all of the unforgivable death and destruction there had an obvious cause: the Constitution. You hadn't heard? Here's The Washington Post: "Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said one reason federal assets were not used more quickly was `because our constitutional system really places the primary authority in each state with the governor.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist was remembered by President Bush yesterday as a good and gracious man who "earned a place among our greatest chief justices," while his children recalled a father who always saved time for family and fun. "No one smelled more roses than my dad," said James C. Rehnquist, the only son of the chief justice, who died Saturday at age 80. The funeral at St. Matthew's Cathedral was highlighted by stories describing...
NEWS
By Jan Crawford Greenburg and Jan Crawford Greenburg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - In a simple, unvarnished pine casket draped with an American flag, the body of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist was carried yesterday to the great marble building that defined his life, and tearful justices, family members and former clerks gathered to say quiet farewells to their longtime leader. "Here, you honored our nation with your service," said Rehnquist's pastor, the Rev. George Evans. "Know you are loved." Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Rehnquist's old friend and former law school classmate, who announced her retirement in June, wept.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush selected Judge John G. Roberts Jr. to be chief justice of the United States yesterday, elevating a well-regarded nominee who already appeared to be on a smooth path to the Supreme Court. The move, two days after the death of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, opened a new chapter in Bush's drive to reshape the judiciary with conservatives whose decisions could have sweeping consequences on such issues as abortion rights and the limits of government power. In an Oval Office announcement, with Roberts at his side, Bush said he wanted the Senate to confirm the 50-year-old U.S. appeals court judge in time for him to lead the Supreme Court when its new term begins next month.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 2005
The death of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is expected to have a profound impact on the administration and decision making of the Supreme Court, possibly steering it in more conservative directions on hot-button issues such as reproductive rights, church-state relations and the war on terrorism. Court watchers say the effect might be all the greater because the court, after an unusually long time - 11 years - without a change in its roster, will have two new justices. "Anytime you change a justice at all you change the court because of the interaction among them.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 5, 2005
The strain of covering a crisis on the scale of Hurricane Katrina was apparent yesterday as television networks and cable channels found themselves juggling the breaking news of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist's death, which was announced late Saturday night, with nearly round-the-clock reports on the suffering and relief efforts along the Gulf Coast. News executives' inability to decide which story was more important was apparent yesterday on CBS, NBC and ABC. All three networks are reshaping their news departments after the departures of longtime anchormen Dan Rather and Tom Brokaw, and the death of Peter Jennings.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - Amid intense speculation that he will step down in June, ailing Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist returned to the bench yesterday for the first time since he began treatments for thyroid cancer and appeared determined to pick up where he left off five months ago. Without fanfare or comment, Rehnquist took his center seat when public arguments opened at 10 a.m., then presided over the court for the next two hours, interjecting questions and,...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- If President Clinton is tried on impeachment charges, the Senate will quickly learn what is already common knowledge across the street at the Supreme Court: Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist will take charge, and in a commanding way.Although keeping control over 100 senators would require different instincts and talents than those Rehnquist uses in running a nine-judge court, those close to him say they have no doubt he will adapt energetically to...
NEWS
September 5, 2005
FROM HIS early days as an attorney and a top official at the Justice Department to his tenure as Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, William H. Rehnquist had a profound impact on the U.S. judiciary and on American life and politics. A friendly man who followed a true conservative philosophy, Mr. Rehnquist, who died last week at the age of 80, after battling thyroid cancer, pushed the court to the right, but was not doctrinaire while doing so. His death creates a second vacancy on the court in just two months -- following the retirement of Sandra Day O'Connor in July -- after 11 years with no changes.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 2005
WASHINGTON -- As the news of the death of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist began to sink in yesterday, lawmakers and court watchers tried to keep the focus on his lengthy tenure and legacy. But with the unusual situation of two vacancies just four weeks before the beginning of the high court's fall term, there also was debate over the best way to proceed. The tributes to Rehnquist began pouring in late Saturday as word of his death from thyroid cancer spread. Rehnquist, 80, had been sick since last fall but had staunchly refused any talk of resignation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.