Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRehabilitation Hospital
IN THE NEWS

Rehabilitation Hospital

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | June 13, 1991
Expedito "Pedro" Lugo, whose near fatal beating alongside Patterson Park last month drew attention to rising violence among students in Southeast Baltimore, has regained consciousness and was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital yesterday.Mr. Lugo's skull was fractured when he was beaten with a baseball bat on May 17, leaving him unconscious and on a life support system at Johns Hopkins Hospital.In the first weeks, his older sister, Maria Ramona Arias said her family feared that her brother would never open his eyes again.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2013
A recent Sun Article by Andrea Walker discussed the University of Maryland Medical Center's intention to rename Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital ("Kernan hospital changing name," July 8). James Lawrence Kernan was a Baltimore businessman who owned theaters and hotels. Mr. Kernan moved into one of his hotels and converted his mansion and estate to a hospital for children and later to include adults who required rehabilitative care. During his lifetime, Mr. Kernan watched his dream come true and the hospital become a success.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | June 13, 1991
Expedito "Pedro" Lugo, 24, whose skull was fractured during a savage beating with his own baseball bat last month near Patterson Park, is improving.Lugo, of the 400 block of N. Kenwood Ave., was moved yesterday from Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he remained for several weeks on a life-support system, to the Montebello Rehabilitation Hospital's head injury unit."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital is changing its name to better reflect its ties to the University of Maryland Medical System. The hospital will be known as the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute effective this month. The new name is also meant to reflect its focus on innovation and research. The 144-bed hospital is the largest inpatient rehabilitation hospital and provider of rehabilitation services in the state. Patients come to the hospital after recovering from strokes, traumatic injury and other illnesses.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 9, 1990
WASHINGTON -- In giving the commencement address at Boston College in 1982, then Vice President George Bush said it was an especially great day for him because he had a daughter in the graduating class.It was news to most of the students there.Just as it was news to the public affairs director of Maine's tourism office that the young woman who had started work there one morning in 1988 was the president's daughter. And news to the customers at Deering Ice Cream shop in Portland, Maine, that the woman coming in for lunch, dressed in a sweat suit and lugging one kid under one arm, another by her side, was anything more than just another mother, just another Mainer.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital is changing its name to better reflect its ties to the University of Maryland Medical System. The hospital will be known as the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute effective this month. The new name is also meant to reflect its focus on innovation and research. The 144-bed hospital is the largest inpatient rehabilitation hospital and provider of rehabilitation services in the state. Patients come to the hospital after recovering from strokes, traumatic injury and other illnesses.
NEWS
February 21, 1996
Grant Sawyer, 77, a former governor of Nevada who was a champion of tough gaming control standards and a leading advocate of environmental protections and equal rights, died Monday at a rehabilitation hospital in Las Vegas. His death was ** attributed to complications from a 1993 stroke.He was governor from 1958 through 1966.Toru Takemitsu, 65, a Japanese composer who won worldwide recognition for blending Eastern instruments and melodies with Western classical music, died Tuesday in Tokyo.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2004
Dr. Charles Morris Narrow, a noted pain management and rehabilitation physician, died of a heart attack Nov. 19 in his Owings Mills home. He was 48. The day he died, he had been expected to leave for Israel, where he was scheduled to speak at the annual conference of the Israel Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Dr. Narrow was born and raised in Levittown, Pa., and earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1978 from Earlham College in Richmond, Ind. He graduated from Ross University School of Medicine in Edison, N.J., in 1988 and completed his residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation in 1992 at National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, D.C., where he was chief resident.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | June 13, 1991
Expedito "Pedro" Lugo, whose near fatal beating alongside Patterson Park last month drew attention to rising violence among students in Southeast Baltimore, has regained consciousness and was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital yesterday.Mr. Lugo's skull was fractured when he was beaten with a baseball bat on May 17, leaving him unconscious and on a life support system at Johns Hopkins Hospital.In the first weeks, his older sister, Maria Ramona Arias said her family feared that her brother would never open his eyes again.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
City emergency management officials are working with officials at Kernan Hospital to restore water after a water main break on its Dickeyville campus cut its supply, officials said late Wednesday morning. Gaylene Adamczyk, a hospital spokeswoman, said the hospital was never fully without water and is not evacuating its patients, though emergency officials had said that was being considered. "We are maintaining our clinical operations at this time," Adamczyk said about 12:45 p.m. The orthopedics and rehabilitation hospital has 118 patients, said Ian Brennan, a Baltimore Fire spokesman.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
City emergency management officials are working with officials at Kernan Hospital to restore water after a water main break on its Dickeyville campus cut its supply, officials said late Wednesday morning. Gaylene Adamczyk, a hospital spokeswoman, said the hospital was never fully without water and is not evacuating its patients, though emergency officials had said that was being considered. "We are maintaining our clinical operations at this time," Adamczyk said about 12:45 p.m. The orthopedics and rehabilitation hospital has 118 patients, said Ian Brennan, a Baltimore Fire spokesman.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
The University Specialty Hospital is expected to move its inpatient chronic care services to other hospitals in the University of Maryland Medical System in July, hospital and state officials said Tuesday. Hospital officials said they would move the traumatic brain injury program to Kernan Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital and ventilator-dependent patients to Maryland General Hospital. The specialty hospital will provide only outpatient programs. The specialty hospital staff will be able to apply for open positions within the system, though it's unclear how many of the 350 employees will find jobs, according to state and hospital officials.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Doctors have called Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' recovery so far nothing short of spectacular. But as she begins rehabilitation at a facility in Houston, many Maryland experts on traumatic brain injury caution that what awaits her is a long, arduous road full of uncertainties. The work of retraining the brain after a severe gunshot wound like the one Giffords sustained two weeks ago can take years, beginning with months of intensive speech, occupational and physical therapy to teach the Arizona congresswoman to master basic functions many of us take for granted: dressing herself, eating and, perhaps, uttering a few words.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2004
Dr. Charles Morris Narrow, a noted pain management and rehabilitation physician, died of a heart attack Nov. 19 in his Owings Mills home. He was 48. The day he died, he had been expected to leave for Israel, where he was scheduled to speak at the annual conference of the Israel Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Dr. Narrow was born and raised in Levittown, Pa., and earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1978 from Earlham College in Richmond, Ind. He graduated from Ross University School of Medicine in Edison, N.J., in 1988 and completed his residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation in 1992 at National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, D.C., where he was chief resident.
NEWS
By Mark Fazollah | November 17, 1996
MANAGUA, Nicaragua - In a tragic form of postwar unity, former Sandinista soldiers and contra rebels hobble together through the hallways at Managua's Rehabilitation Hospital to have their prostheses refitted.Some have wooden legs that have cracked. Some have artificial limbs whose internal bushings have worn out. Some amputees have simply lost weight and their prostheses no longer fit them."No one fights here," said Eddy Garcia, who directs the state hospital's prosthesis manufacturing center.
NEWS
July 21, 1996
Max Baum, 83, family physicianAt 83, Dr. Max Baum still made house calls and opened his family practice daily. He worked a full schedule at his Eastern Avenue office the day before he died."
NEWS
July 24, 2013
A recent Sun Article by Andrea Walker discussed the University of Maryland Medical Center's intention to rename Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital ("Kernan hospital changing name," July 8). James Lawrence Kernan was a Baltimore businessman who owned theaters and hotels. Mr. Kernan moved into one of his hotels and converted his mansion and estate to a hospital for children and later to include adults who required rehabilitative care. During his lifetime, Mr. Kernan watched his dream come true and the hospital become a success.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
The University Specialty Hospital is expected to move its inpatient chronic care services to other hospitals in the University of Maryland Medical System in July, hospital and state officials said Tuesday. Hospital officials said they would move the traumatic brain injury program to Kernan Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital and ventilator-dependent patients to Maryland General Hospital. The specialty hospital will provide only outpatient programs. The specialty hospital staff will be able to apply for open positions within the system, though it's unclear how many of the 350 employees will find jobs, according to state and hospital officials.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
FOR SEVEN decades, the land at 2201 Argonne Drive in Northeast Baltimore has been occupied by a medical institution, most recently known as the Montebello Rehabilitation Hospital.Within a few years, it is scheduled to become the site of a $31 million fine arts center for Morgan State University, including a 1,270-seat performance hall.This week, state officials interviewed five architectural teams under consideration to design the building to house programs in the performing and visual arts.
NEWS
February 21, 1996
Grant Sawyer, 77, a former governor of Nevada who was a champion of tough gaming control standards and a leading advocate of environmental protections and equal rights, died Monday at a rehabilitation hospital in Las Vegas. His death was ** attributed to complications from a 1993 stroke.He was governor from 1958 through 1966.Toru Takemitsu, 65, a Japanese composer who won worldwide recognition for blending Eastern instruments and melodies with Western classical music, died Tuesday in Tokyo.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.