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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Maryland's state-run mortgage program is launching a new loan product aimed at residents buying homes in need of rehabbing. The "acquisition rehabilitation" loans will allow eligible applicants to borrow money through the Maryland Mortgage Program to cover the cost of the purchase and the repairs or renovations at the same time, the state says. Borrowers would also be able to tap into the state's assistance with down payments and settlement costs. The state says one of its goals for the loan is to stabilize neighborhoods "rocked by foreclosures.
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SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Nolan Reimold has reached the end of his 20-day injury rehabilitation assignment, but the Orioles have yet to decide whether they will designate the outfielder for assignment or add him to the club's 25-man active roster, executive vice president Dan Duquette said Monday. Reimold, 30, remains on the 60-day major league disabled list after finishing his rehab stint Sunday. He had been recovering from complications surrounding corrective neck surgery last July. “We're still talking to Nolan and trying to figure out a way to keep him with the ballclub,” Duquette said.
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EXPLORE
February 7, 2012
The rehabilitation of the Old Towson Jail into an office building was honored by the Maryland Historical Trust last week as part of the organization's 2012 Maryland Preservation Awards The rehabilitation of the historic jail, now known as Bosley Hall, was cited as, "an outstanding example of a public/private partnership undertaken by the Baltimore County government. " The trust gave the project its award under Preservation Partnerships, and noted the collaboration of Baltimore County government; developer Towson Jail Associates, which was created for the rehabilitation project; Azola & Associates Inc.; and others for the project.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
An addiction rehabilitation psychiatrist with a history of treatment for alcohol and drug abuse was among those charged Wednesday with manufacturing and distributing the drug Ecstasy at a Towson home. Dr. Priscilla W. Sheldon-Cost, 51, and her boyfriend, Thomas Ronald Joyave, 52, of the 700 block of Walker Ave. are both charged with five counts of narcotics offenses, including manufacturing and possessing drugs with the intent to distribute them, Baltimore County police said. Vincent Mark Ricker, 24, of the 7700 block of Fairgreen Road faces the same charges.
NEWS
By Donald F. Norris | August 23, 2005
EDWARD T. NORRIS, former Maryland state police superintendent and former Baltimore City police commissioner, was convicted last year of stealing public funds and of filing false tax returns. He was sentenced to and has recently completed serving six months in a federal prison and has returned to Baltimore to begin a court-ordered 500 hours of community service. Mr. Norris' community service obligation is being made a mockery as he has been elevated to the status of a local "personality" by a Baltimore radio station, intent on capitalizing on his notoriety.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
Integrated Health Services Inc. said yesterday it has purchased a private Minnesota rehabilitation company and would use it to expand rehabilitation services in its own chain of nursing homes.The Owings Mills company bought Achievement Rehabilitation Inc. of Minnetonka, Minn., for $22.5 million in Integrated Health Services stock, said Marc Levin, senior vice president. He said Achievement Rehabilitation's owners and managers will run a new division that will manage Integrated Health's rehabilitation business.
NEWS
May 31, 2002
Elizabeth Hickman Anderson, a retired psychiatric hospital rehabilitation director and Morgan State University benefactor, died May 24 of heart failure at her Cross Keys home. She was 88. Born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., Elizabeth Hickman Williams earned her bachelor's degree from Hunter College in 1942. For many years until retiring and moving to Baltimore in the early 1970s, Mrs. Anderson had been the director of rehabilitation at Creedmore Psychiatric Center in Queens, N.Y. She had also been president of the National Rehabilitation Association in Washington.
NEWS
By Arlen Specter | January 5, 1994
WHEN Congress reconvenes on Jan. 25, it has a chance to do something meaningful about violent crime.The crime bill the Senate passed before the holiday recess is a start; it would provide $22.3 billion over five years for a broad range of anticrime activities, including building new prisons and hiring more police officers.Something else needs to be part of any serious approach to crime, but hardly anyone is willing to advocate it because it is unpopular to appear concerned about convicts.
NEWS
June 2, 1996
Thomas Eugene Fowlkes, who as a RETURN program coordinator at Sinai Hospital worked tirelessly to help people with brain injuries regain their independence and ability to work, died May 12 of AIDS at his Jessup residence. He was 40.Mr. Fowlkes joined the staff of RETURN, which was established at the Northwest Baltimore hospital in 1986, in 1990 as a facilitator and created the Community Reentry II program, which prepared patients to return to their homes and jobs."He had an enormous amount of patience and empathy, and could help people manage their grief and get them over the rough spots," said Fran Forstenzer, RETURN program manager.
NEWS
By Ronald Q. Ellis | October 3, 1990
AFTER reading Marina Sarris' "State is probing Thanos' early release from prison" (Evening Sun, Sept. 19), I realized once again how people are casting a short-sighted view on a very serious problem.John Thanos spent about 25 years in prison, over half of his life, and when he gets released, he is accused of going on a spree of senseless crimes. Like most people, I, too, have a problem with a deranged individual running around committing senseless murders. However, in my mind the question isn't why Thanos wasn't incarcerated a few extra months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
UPDATES AT END... Ray Rice's Friday news conference was one of those media events I wanted to give myself some time to think about. Now that I've thought about it for almost 24 hours, I can say without reservation it is one of the worst media PR disasters I have ever seen. And that perhaps says as much about the Ravens and Rice's apparent legion of advisers and handlers as it does the troubled running back himself. It violated almost every rule of how to use a news conference to try to redeem a badly damaged image.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - Dylan Bundy was months into rehabilitating his surgically repaired right elbow, and the tedium of throwing exercises was beginning to test the 21-year-old's mettle. He wanted to feel that he was advancing. He wanted to get the competitive juices flowing. Really, the Orioles phenom wanted to be a pitcher again, not just some guy tossing a baseball 90 or 180 feet on a back field in Florida. And then Brady Anderson made a simple gesture - partly motivational, partly for his own survival.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
During Tuesday's teleconference with the Orioles' Gold Glove Award winners , third baseman Manny Machado was asked about his left knee and his recovery from the Oct. 14 surgery in California that repaired his torn medial patellofemoral ligament. Machado had issued a statement after the surgery but hadn't been quoted directly before. There was nothing illuminating in his response Tuesday, but he sounded upbeat. “It's been going great," said Machado, who was injured Sept.
FEATURES
October 25, 2013
Houses with a history. That's what The Baltimore Sun is looking for. The Baltimore region is dotted with homes that have a rich past, ranging from Federalist to Victorian to Arts and Crafts. Is yours one of them? This fall, we are sponsoring a contest to find those dwellings that beautifully reflect the era in which they came to life - whether it be through preservation, rehabilitation or restoration. All kinds of historic homes are eligible, including those that have been adapted for use as living space, such as converted churches, barns and carriage houses.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | October 24, 2013
The Harford County Commission on Disabilities hosted its annual Employment Recognition Luncheon Thursday at the Maryland Golf and Country Clubs in Bel Air, honoring several employers, individuals and organizations. The luncheon's main purpose is to "celebrate the accomplishments and achievements of people with disabilities who overcome obstacles in their pursuit of excellence," according to Committee Co-Chair Niki Biggs. "Their accomplishments are especially significant in this difficult job market.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
The Town of Bel Air is taking small steps to create a pedestrian path connecting Rockfield Park with Bel Air High School. One of the first steps toward that goal was taken Tuesday evening when members of the Board of Town Commissioners approved an easement across one private property during their town meeting. The 8-foot wide easement across 404 Giles St. was approved unanimously by the four commissioners present. Mayor Edward Hopkins, who had a death in his family, was absent.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Washington Bullets forward Juwan Howard entered a plea of not guilty in D.C. Superior Court yesterday to the charge of driving under the influence last month, but in doing so also agreed to attend a 26-class alcohol rehabilitation and education program.If Howard completes the court-monitored course, the drunk driving charges will be dropped. The case was continued, with another hearing scheduled for Feb. 24 and, according to D.C. Corporation counsel Charles Ruff, Howard has until that date to complete the course unless he asks for an extension.
BUSINESS
By Tawn Nhan and Tawn Nhan,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 12, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- When Bill Heriegel was hit by an oncoming truck at work last month, he thought he was going to die.His body was twisted by the impact, which left tissues in his back and side permanently damaged. Going back to work was probably the last thing on his mind.But thanks to an innovative work-rehabilitation program that his employer paid for, all Mr. Heriegel thinks about now is getting back to his job."I am looking forward to going back to work on August 19," Mr. Heriegel said proudly as he worked on a rowing machine designed to build upper-body strength at WorkHab, a work-rehabilitation center based in suburban Huntingdon Valley, Pa.Instead of becoming a "couch potato with nothing to do," Mr. Heriegel said, he's been able to build up his strength by doing exercises that simulate his duties as a driver for the Philadelphia General Asphalt & Paving Co. His company is one of a growing number of employers that are electing to place injured employees on work-rehabilitation programs such as WorkHab.
NEWS
By Jason Tashea | August 28, 2013
Between Jan. 1, 2009, and Dec. 31, 2011, not one youth under the age of 18 in Baltimore City got to vote in a local election, join the military or rent a car; however, 907 were charged and held as adults by our criminal justice system. Currently, in Maryland, there are 33 different offenses that if charged send a youth directly into adult criminal proceedings, no matter the circumstances. This needs to end. In Maryland, if a youth - in some instances as young as 14 - commits one of 33 specified "exclusionary offenses," he or she is automatically excluded from juvenile proceedings and charged, held and processed through the adult criminal justice system.
NEWS
By Aisha Braveboy | July 23, 2013
If the state of Maryland is serious about reducing crime, we need to be more proactive about preventive programs and seriously consider diversion programs for our youth. The recent ACLU report on arrests for marijuana possession and The Sun's June 8 editorial "Maryland's New Jim Crow" have brought much needed attention to mass incarceration in the Maryland criminal justice system. The ACLU's report raises broader questions about criminal justice policies in our state. Is mass incarceration for petty offenses a good use of public resources?
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