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Regulatory Process

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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1999
St. Agnes HealthCare, Suburban and other Maryland hospitals lost out yesterday as a Senate committee killed legislation that would have cleared the way for them to begin offering open-heart surgery.With an 8-3 vote, the Senate Finance Committee rejected a bill sponsored by Montgomery County Sen. Brian E. Frosh that was designed to clear regulatory hurdles blocking a handful of hospitals, including Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, from doing heart surgery.Legislators said similar legislation pending in the House of Delegates, aimed at helping St. Agnes in Southwest Baltimore win the right to do heart surgery, was also effectively dead following the Finance Committee vote.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
State energy regulators have scheduled an October start for hearings to consider Constellation Energy Group's deal to sell itself to Chicago-based Exelon Corp. On Tuesday, the Maryland Public Service Commission scheduled evidentiary hearings to begin on Oct. 31 and continue until Nov. 10 for a total of nine days of hearings. The public will have opportunities to comment on the proposed merger worth $7.9 billion at three evening hearings: Nov. 29, Dec. 1 and Dec. 5. The PSC set a Jan. 5 deadline to make a decision.
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 16, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- In a move to consolidate some of its offices, the Food and Drug Administration will bring about 930 jobs from scattered sites in Maryland and Washington to a campus to be built here by the turn of the century, officials announced yesterday.In addition, through an agreement signed yesterday, FDA scientists at the new location will share research and facilities with students and faculty at the nearby University of Maryland College Park.The plan will bring to the new site the sections of the FDA that deal with food safety and veterinary medicine.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
Like most food companies, McCormick & Co. Inc. is paying more for ingredients such as flour and soy oil that go into making its spices and flavorings. But by raising prices about 5 percent, the Sparks company was able to offset the higher commodities costs to post a record second quarter. Net income increased $53.3 million, or 41 cents per share, for the quarter that ended May 31. That was compared with $41.4 million, or 31 cents per share, for the quarter a year ago. Excluding restructuring charges and credits, per share earnings were 39 cents, an 11 percent increase over a year earlier and in line with the expectations of analysts surveyed by Thomson.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
A deal for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to buy electricity from a neighboring utility is so good for ratepayers that BGE should consider pushing up the implementation date from 1997 to next year, according to the Office of the People's Counsel, the state agency that represents ratepayers."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 30, 1995
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has taken a look at the way duck hunting seasons and bag limits are set and has decided to try to make the process more user friendly.Under proposals released earlier this week, options for the 1995-1996 duck seasons would be limited to one of three packages, with an eye toward maintaining consistency, objectivity and predictability in the regulatory process."In the past, hunters often have become confused by the complexity of the regulatory process, a lack of clearly stated harvest-management objectives and an overly large number of regulatory options," said Mollie Beattie, director of the USFWS.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
Maryland's next governor is likely to change or kill the state's workplace smoking ban, one of the toughest in the country.Republican nominee Ellen R. Sauerbrey and Democratic nominee Parris N. Glendening said they would withdraw the sweeping anti-smoking regulation, which is now on hold while a court considers legal challenges.Mrs. Sauerbrey, a state delegate from Baltimore County, said she would not resurrect the ban if she is elected in November. If the state wants to restrict smoking in the workplace, she said, it should do so through the legislature.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration said yesterday that it would start focusing all environmental protection standards on the risks that pollution poses to the health of children.The change could lead to tougher rules on pollutants as diverse as soot fouling the air and microbes contaminating tap water.The Environmental Protection Agency said it would adopt this approach not only when writing new rules but by reviewing and revising several of the most important regulations that are already on the books.
NEWS
July 5, 1993
State Sen. Thomas P. O'Reilly of Prince George's County has every right to champion the cause of independent power producers trying to break the monopoly on power plants held by public utilities such as Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. But Mr. O'Reilly has no right to use undue influence and political muscle to force the Public Service Commission to do things his way.His efforts to strong-arm the PSC failed. But chairman Frank O. Heintz was so appalled at Mr. O'Reilly's actions that he took the highly unusual step of accusing the senator of "an inappropriate attempt to unduly influence our deliberations" in a manner that may have violated the law.Mr.
NEWS
December 1, 1994
One of the ironies of Roger Hayden's tenure as Baltimore County executive is that the local Republican ascendancy inspired by his 1990 victory will have to go on without him.This could have been, maybe should have been, another year of triumph for Mr. Hayden. In a campaign season dominated by Republicans, conservatives and anti-politicians, he seemed a shoo-in. As executive, he had wielded the budget ax that many of this year's candidates said would be their weapon of choice once they gained public office.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
As Maryland legislators begin hearings this week on reforms to the state's system for disciplining doctors, they are confronting a problem that has bedeviled other states throughout the nation for years: What is the most effective way to protect patients from medical errors that cause serious injury or death? The debate pits the state's medical society -- MedChi, which now plays a major role in the state regulatory process -- against those who want to make it easier to pursue cases against doctors accused of wrongdoing or of providing negligent or substandard care.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 2000
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The European Commission is planning to merge its latest investigation into Microsoft Corp.'s practices with an antitrust case that it opened against the company in 1998, lawyers here said yesterday. A consolidation would not only speed up the legal process, it would also strengthen the commission's case against Microsoft, antitrust lawyers said. The first investigation by European regulators into Microsoft began in 1998, after a complaint from Sun Microsystems Inc. The commission, the administrative arm of the European Union, started proceedings based on accusations that Microsoft abused its dominant position in the market for personal computer operating systems.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1999
St. Agnes HealthCare, Suburban and other Maryland hospitals lost out yesterday as a Senate committee killed legislation that would have cleared the way for them to begin offering open-heart surgery.With an 8-3 vote, the Senate Finance Committee rejected a bill sponsored by Montgomery County Sen. Brian E. Frosh that was designed to clear regulatory hurdles blocking a handful of hospitals, including Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, from doing heart surgery.Legislators said similar legislation pending in the House of Delegates, aimed at helping St. Agnes in Southwest Baltimore win the right to do heart surgery, was also effectively dead following the Finance Committee vote.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration said yesterday that it would start focusing all environmental protection standards on the risks that pollution poses to the health of children.The change could lead to tougher rules on pollutants as diverse as soot fouling the air and microbes contaminating tap water.The Environmental Protection Agency said it would adopt this approach not only when writing new rules but by reviewing and revising several of the most important regulations that are already on the books.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 16, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- In a move to consolidate some of its offices, the Food and Drug Administration will bring about 930 jobs from scattered sites in Maryland and Washington to a campus to be built here by the turn of the century, officials announced yesterday.In addition, through an agreement signed yesterday, FDA scientists at the new location will share research and facilities with students and faculty at the nearby University of Maryland College Park.The plan will bring to the new site the sections of the FDA that deal with food safety and veterinary medicine.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 30, 1995
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has taken a look at the way duck hunting seasons and bag limits are set and has decided to try to make the process more user friendly.Under proposals released earlier this week, options for the 1995-1996 duck seasons would be limited to one of three packages, with an eye toward maintaining consistency, objectivity and predictability in the regulatory process."In the past, hunters often have become confused by the complexity of the regulatory process, a lack of clearly stated harvest-management objectives and an overly large number of regulatory options," said Mollie Beattie, director of the USFWS.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | December 12, 1990
On Tuesday, the Striped Bass Advisory Board will hold what should be its last public meeting of the year. It is expected that recommendations for the 1991 rockfish seasons will arise from that session and be forwarded to the Department of Natural Resources.At this point, the advisory board is in agreement that it favors a fall fishery similar to what had been expected to be a five-week season this year and the initiation of a limited spring fishery in 1991 -- if DNR figures show the stocks can support one."
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
Like most food companies, McCormick & Co. Inc. is paying more for ingredients such as flour and soy oil that go into making its spices and flavorings. But by raising prices about 5 percent, the Sparks company was able to offset the higher commodities costs to post a record second quarter. Net income increased $53.3 million, or 41 cents per share, for the quarter that ended May 31. That was compared with $41.4 million, or 31 cents per share, for the quarter a year ago. Excluding restructuring charges and credits, per share earnings were 39 cents, an 11 percent increase over a year earlier and in line with the expectations of analysts surveyed by Thomson.
NEWS
December 1, 1994
One of the ironies of Roger Hayden's tenure as Baltimore County executive is that the local Republican ascendancy inspired by his 1990 victory will have to go on without him.This could have been, maybe should have been, another year of triumph for Mr. Hayden. In a campaign season dominated by Republicans, conservatives and anti-politicians, he seemed a shoo-in. As executive, he had wielded the budget ax that many of this year's candidates said would be their weapon of choice once they gained public office.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
Maryland's next governor is likely to change or kill the state's workplace smoking ban, one of the toughest in the country.Republican nominee Ellen R. Sauerbrey and Democratic nominee Parris N. Glendening said they would withdraw the sweeping anti-smoking regulation, which is now on hold while a court considers legal challenges.Mrs. Sauerbrey, a state delegate from Baltimore County, said she would not resurrect the ban if she is elected in November. If the state wants to restrict smoking in the workplace, she said, it should do so through the legislature.
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