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By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
State and federal environmental regulators approved design plans for the Harbor Point project Thursday, allowing Beatty Development Group LLC to begin preparation work at the former factory site, a state spokesman said. More approvals are required before construction may commence. The plans call for workers to temporarily expose contaminated soil while they install pilings for a 22-story tower that will become Exelon Corp's regional headquarters. The soil and groundwater contain cancer-causing hexavalent chromium dating to the site's use as a processing plant.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The Baltimore County Council is consider new rules for races that are run through neighborhoods after receiving complaints that organizers of a recent event spray-painted streets in Towson. Councilman David Marks, a Perry Hall Republican who represents Towson, wants to regulate races like parades, requiring them to use non-permanent course markings and notify the community about proposed routes. "It's good to give neighbors more information," said Marks, who introduced the bill at Monday's council meeting.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The Federal Reserve announced Tuesday that Patapsco Bancorp of Dundalk has agreed to take steps to maintain the soundness of the company and its Patapsco Bank subsidiary The company and the bank must submit plans showing how they will sustain sufficient capital, improve the bank's earnings, strengthen board oversight of management and operations, and reduce problem assets and exposure to commercial real estate. The company also can't declare dividends or borrow any money without regulators' approval.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Getting a flag from the federal government wouldn't have provided much consolation for the family of the U.S. Postal Service employee who was shot to death last year on his route in Prince George's County. But June Barnette, a great-uncle of Tyson Barnette, says a flag would have been a welcome gesture of respect for the 26-year-old letter carrier, whose death sparked a national debate about the safety of after-hours mail delivery. "I feel deep in my heart that it would have been appreciated," said Barnette, who lives in South Carolina, where his great-nephew grew up. "Ain't nothing like that going to hurt.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, Lorraine Mirabella and Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2010
K Bank on Friday became the latest Maryland bank to fail after its board of directors — unable to turn around the finances or find a buyer — took the rare step of voting to turn over the Owings Mills-based institution to state regulators. Immediately after the regulator takeover, the bank's deposits and most of its assets were sold to regional rival M&T Bank. K Bank's seven branches will reopen Saturday as M&T Bank. This is the second failed Maryland bank taken over by M&T, which also purchased Bradford Bank in Towson last year.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
First Mariner Bancorp Chairman and CEO Edwin F. Hale Sr. said Friday that the company is continuing to try to raise capital and to work with regulators who have put the largest Baltimore-based bank under heightened scrutiny for two years. Hale was responding to an auditor's letter that casts doubt about the bank holding company's ability to remain in business. The letter was included with financial statements filed Thursday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. A prominent businessman who founded First Mariner, Hale said the auditor's "going concern" warning had long been expected.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Some banks soon will find it more difficult to slap consumers with overdraft fees — a boon to customers who discover that one misstep can lead to a cascade of penalties. Guidelines that take effect next month will prohibit thousands of small banks from processing transactions in order of the highest dollar amount to lowest — a practice that empties customer accounts faster and triggers more overdrafts. Similar guidelines could be in store for the big players, too. And one major bank, Citibank, announced recently that it would no longer process paper checks from high to low — a move that could encourage competitors to follow suit.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Talbot Bank of Easton, Maryland said Friday it has entered into a consent order with federal and state regulators. That order from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the Commissioner of Financial Regulation of Maryland requires the bank to improve its credit quality and revise some of its policies and procedures, the bank said. "No bank has been immune from the challenges created by the economic downturn," CEO Patrick M. Bilbrough said in a statement. "As we deal with those challenges, we are working closely with the FDIC and the commissioner to make sure that we handle these challenges in the correct way in a timely manner.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
State banking regulators closed two Maryland banks Friday, the first two bank failures in the state since 2010. The Maryland Commissioner of Financial Regulation shut down the Bank of the Eastern Shore in Cambridge and appointed the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as receiver. The FDIC created the Deposit Insurance National Bank of Eastern Shore to allow customers to access their deposits until May 25. The state financial commissioner also closed HarVest Bank of Maryland in Gaithersburg, whose deposits and other assets were acquired by Sonabank in McLean, Va. HarVest's four branches will reopen during normal business hours as Sonabank's branches.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Weeks before federal trucking regulators ordered Gunthers Transport LLC off the road for being an "imminent hazard" to the public, the owner's son filed the paperwork to create a new entity: Clock Transport LLC. The new trucking company, which shares the Hanover address of Gunthers Transport, was cited for a safety violation last month. One of its trucks failed an inspection in Ohio, which sidelined the vehicle and driver until the problems were fixed. Maryland State Police said Monday that their troopers have been ordered to pull over and inspect trucks bearing either name.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
A state panel on Tuesday hashed out more of the nitty-gritty details to create a medical marijuana industry from scratch, but some key points remained unresolved as the commission nears a deadline next week. Maryland's Medical Marijuana Commission plans to release Wednesday a second draft of regulations to create the program. Those 81-pages of rules have been reshaped after the first draft came under fire at a public hearing last month. Among the many changes in the new draft: removing a provision that would have effectively outlawed a grower or dispensary operation within Baltimore city limits.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Ocean City officials voted earlier this week to draft a law to restrict smoking on the beach and boardwalk beginning May 1, 2015. The proposed ordinance, which passed on a 4-3 vote at a work session for the town council on Tuesday, identifies a number of designated areas for smoking along the boardwalk and on the beach. Police will be responsible for enforcement of the law through verbal as well as written citations ranging from $25 to $1,000, a "worse-case scenario" for non-compliance.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Critics took aim Tuesday at proposed regulations to create a medical marijuana industry in Maryland as a state commission tasked with writing the rules rushed toward a deadline it might not meet. Physicians, patients, advocates and potential growers said the commission did not collect enough public input before drafting the rules - which they said appear to forbid a medical marijuana dispensary anywhere within Baltimore city limits. Final regulations are due in less than three weeks, but the public hearing in Annapolis Tuesday was the commission's first.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Law enforcement agencies in the Baltimore area and across the country are researching drones, intrigued by their potential for high-risk tactical raids and gathering intelligence. But uncertainty over federal regulations, concern about privacy issues and other factors have slowed many agencies from acquiring the unmanned aircraft. "There are still many unanswered questions into the future of drone use and how the [Federal Aviation Administration] will regulate those efforts," said Harford County sheriff's office spokeswoman Cristie Kahler.
TRAVEL
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Pole dancing got a toehold on Ocean City's boardwalk over the weekend, and neither city officials nor area merchants seem too thrilled. Saturday night, an unidentified woman wearing a bikini set up a pole on the boardwalk and danced for onlookers. Police were powerless to do anything - a federal court recently ruled that street performers have a right to perform in public places like the boardwalk, apparently even if what they do is decidedly adult-oriented. And though she doesn't seem to have been back since, the dancer clearly made an impression.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2011
Federal regulators have ordered Regal Bank & Trust in Owings Mills to make certain changes, such as drawing up written plans for maintaining capital levels and reducing "substandard" assets, according to a document released Friday by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Regal agreed to the order, issued a month ago, without admitting or denying any charges of unsafe or unsound banking practices, the FDIC said. Regal says it has $189 million in assets. Besides its Owings Mills headquarters, Regal has three branches in Baltimore County and Carroll County.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Maryland's health department has alerted state contractors caring for disabled adults and children that they are obligated to report incidents at their facilities that involve police, fire and medical assistance. The advisory - which comes as broader safeguards are being proposed by child advocates - was sent this week to nearly 300 professionals who work with disabled clients. Regulators said it was spurred by a recent Baltimore Sun investigation of an Anne Arundel County group home operator, LifeLine, which failed to notify regulators about numerous reports alleging abuse and neglect by its staff.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
The Maryland Public Service Commission's decision this week to classify the ride-sharing service Uber as a common carrier is probably not the end of the story as to whether the company will continue its operations in Baltimore City and Annapolis. Uber has said it will appeal the decision, and the PSC itself ordered regulators to begin crafting new rules for for-hire companies in a tacit recognition of the changing nature of the industry. Ultimately, what needs to emerge is a compromise that allows consumers to continue to benefit from Uber's innovative business model (and others that may come after it)
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