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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Three key congressional tobacco foes announced yesterday that they will attempt to get a quick House vote on legislation that would require the Food and Drug Administration to regulate tobacco, but would forbid the agency from imposing a total ban on cigarettes.Reps. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., Mike Synar, D-Okla., and Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said that they have asked the Rules Committee to allow the amendment to be attached to the agriculture appropriations bill in order to put the measure on a fast track to a House vote.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Ocean City officials voted earlier this week to draft a law to restrict smoking on the beach and boardwalk beginning May 1, 2015. The proposed ordinance, which passed on a 4-3 vote at a work session for the town council on Tuesday, identifies a number of designated areas for smoking along the boardwalk and on the beach. Police will be responsible for enforcement of the law through verbal as well as written citations ranging from $25 to $1,000, a "worse-case scenario" for non-compliance.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration should be able to limit nicotine levels in cigarettes, as well as require stronger health warnings on packages and in advertising, legislators considering a bill to allow the agency to regulate tobacco products were told by experts yesterday. "FDA regulation will help us to combat the vicious marketing practices of a deceptive industry that has preyed upon our children, minorities and existing smokers who are desperately trying to kick their habit," Dr. Elmer Huerta, the incoming president of the American Cancer Society, told the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension Committee.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | April 3, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Landmark legislation that would give the federal government the power to regulate cigarettes and other tobacco products passed an early hurdle yesterday. The House Energy and Commerce Committee approved the bill, 38-12. The measure would allow the Food and Drug Administration to review new tobacco products before they could go on sale, limit advertising and restrict sales to youths. It would also enable the agency to regulate levels of tar, nicotine and other ingredients.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Taking on a struggle that is likely to determine the fate of the tobacco industry, the Supreme Court agreed yesterday to rule on the Clinton administration's sweeping plan to control how cigarettes and chewing tobacco are made and sold.Under that plan, aimed mainly at protecting youths, the Food and Drug Administration would restrict minors' access to tobacco items and control the marketing of those products.In the future, the agency could regulate the ingredients of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, probably to reduce or eliminate nicotine.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1994
Dr. David Kessler, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, told 104 graduates of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine yesterday that his agency faces a rare opportunity to make inroads into the rising number of smoking-related deaths.Although he fell short of declaring whether he will attempt to regulate tobacco as a drug, he strongly implied that he savors the chance to do so."We cannot passively cede to the tobacco industry the right to determine the future health of so many of our children," said Dr. Kessler, the keynote speaker during commencement exercises.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Casting aside an array of government rules aimed at keeping children away from tobacco, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday that Congress did not give the Food and Drug Administration power to control how cigarettes or chewing tobacco are made or sold."
NEWS
April 16, 1994
Good thing no one asked those tobacco executives whether they think the world is round or flat. After testifying they don't believe nicotine is addictive and that they have doubts cigarettes cause fatal illnesses like lung cancer, there's no telling what they would have replied.The chief executives of the leading U.S. tobacco companies also denied to a congressional subcommittee that they manipulate nicotine levels in cigarettes to keep smokers hooked. Maybe they don't -- the evidence is inconclusive.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The nation's largest makers of cigarettes and chewing tobacco promised yesterday to accept strict limits on how they sell their products -- from outlawing vending machines to banning all sales to minors -- provided that the government is barred from regulating nicotine as a drug.Philip Morris USA, which makes Marlboro and is top cigarette producer, and UST Inc., which produces Skoal and is the leading maker of smokeless tobacco, said their joint proposal was intended -- just as is the Clinton administration's sweeping plan to regulate tobacco sales -- to curb the use of their products by anyone under 18.Their proposals, however, drew a skeptical reaction from the the Food and Drug Administration and scorn from anti-smoking activists.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's proposed crackdown on teen smoking raises complex questions about just how far the federal government can go to regulate tobacco companies, and whether those proposals would violate the Constitution's free speech protections, legal experts said yesterday.Realizing that the legal conflicts could last months, perhaps years, Mr. Clinton left a window open for the tobacco companies yesterday. He invited them to draft a plan with lawmakers on Capitol Hill, rather than take their case to court.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration should be able to limit nicotine levels in cigarettes, as well as require stronger health warnings on packages and in advertising, legislators considering a bill to allow the agency to regulate tobacco products were told by experts yesterday. "FDA regulation will help us to combat the vicious marketing practices of a deceptive industry that has preyed upon our children, minorities and existing smokers who are desperately trying to kick their habit," Dr. Elmer Huerta, the incoming president of the American Cancer Society, told the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension Committee.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- House and Senate lawmakers of both parties introduced sweeping legislation yesterday to make tobacco subject to the kind of federal safety regulation that now applies to medicines and food, and said prospects for action are the most favorable in years. "This bill is long overdue, and this is the year, I believe, that regulation of tobacco by the Food and Drug Administration is going to become law," said Rep. Henry A. Waxman, a California Democrat who leads the Government Reform Committee.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
The idea of electing Howard County's school board members by district is dead, but another attempt to make the board more representative is in the works. Two Democratic legislators have proposed a bill to increase the school board's size from five to seven members and shorten terms from six to four years, starting this year. That bill will be addressed a public hearing scheduled Feb. 15 in the George Howard Building in Ellicott City. The county legislators voted to kill three other bills at an Annapolis delegation meeting yesterday.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- One of President Clinton's most prized goals -- imposing federal controls on cigarettes and chewing tobacco to keep them away from children and teen-agers -- appeared to be in serious trouble in the Supreme Court yesterday.A one-hour hearing on one of history's most ambitious public health efforts produced strong signs of either open hostility or skepticism from a number of the justices -- especially one of the court's pivotal members, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.The Food and Drug Administration adopted rules in 1996 to regulate nicotine as a drug and cigarettes and chewing tobacco as devices for delivering the drug into the human body.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Taking on a struggle that is likely to determine the fate of the tobacco industry, the Supreme Court agreed yesterday to rule on the Clinton administration's sweeping plan to control how cigarettes and chewing tobacco are made and sold.Under that plan, aimed mainly at protecting youths, the Food and Drug Administration would restrict minors' access to tobacco items and control the marketing of those products.In the future, the agency could regulate the ingredients of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, probably to reduce or eliminate nicotine.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Casting aside an array of government rules aimed at keeping children away from tobacco, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday that Congress did not give the Food and Drug Administration power to control how cigarettes or chewing tobacco are made or sold."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, siding yesterday with smoking opponents, characterized as "totally unreasonable" a key provision of the proposed settlement between the tobacco industry and the nation's attorneys general that would prevent the government from regulating tobacco as a drug.The $368 billion agreement reached June 20 would forbid the Food and Drug Administration from banning nicotine in cigarettes for at least 12 years or if higher-nicotine cigarettes appear on the black market.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
When Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic for the first time, he discovered a native people who delighted in chewing and smoking the dried, pungent leaves of a plant unknown to Europe. Indians consumed them to enhance prayers, ward off illness, to relax.Some of the crewmen indulged out of curiosity and found the leaves to their liking -- and did not stop. Columbus berated his men for succumbing to a custom that apparently repelled him. But he eventually relented, declaring: "It's not within their power to refrain from indulging in the habit."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, siding yesterday with smoking opponents, characterized as "totally unreasonable" a key provision of the proposed settlement between the tobacco industry and the nation's attorneys general that would prevent the government from regulating tobacco as a drug.The $368 billion agreement reached June 20 would forbid the Food and Drug Administration from banning nicotine in cigarettes for at least 12 years or if higher-nicotine cigarettes appear on the black market.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Dr. David A. Kessler, the Food and Drug Administration commissioner who has fought for the regulation of tobacco, worked to standardize nutrition labeling and taken steps to speed the federal drug approval process, has decided to resign after six tumultuous years at the agency, FDA officials said yesterday.Kessler said in an interview that he was stepping down for personal and family reasons and because he felt he had completed the work he had hoped to do at the agency. Appointed by President George Bush in 1990, he was reappointed by President Clinton four years ago.In accepting his resignation, Health and Human Services Secretary Donna E. Shalala said: "David is what you hope for in a public servant.
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