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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | June 1, 1993
My cholesterol and blood pressure are normal and I don't smoke, but I have a desk job and get no regular exercise. How important is exercise for the prevention of a heart attack?Two studies reported in a recent New England Journal of Medicine addressed this issue. One provided evidence that regular exercise during leisure time protected men from dying of heart disease, as well as other causes. The second found that men who were more physically fit had a lower risk of dying from any cardiovascular disease.
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 13, 2012
Many Americans aren't exercising despite all the health messages about obesity and staying in shape, according to a new survey. The report by the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association found that 68.2 million people, or nearly 24 percent of people surveyed, were inactive in 2011. That means that they didn't participate in 119 activities, such as swimming and basketball, identified by the organization.  The number of inactive adults jumped 1.6 pecent from the prior year and 8 percent over the past three years.
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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1994
Q: I have been jogging regularly for several years; but a friend my age just had a heart attack while running, and I now wonder whether it is safe for me to continue my jogging routine.A: Two reports in the December issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, one from this country and one from Germany, shed considerable light on your question.The authors found some bad news: The risk of a heart attack during or in the hour after strenuous exertion, such as jogging or shoveling snow, was two times greater in the German study and six times greater in the American study than during periods of rest or less strenuous activity.
HEALTH
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
Douglas Bayne joined the Merritt Athletic Club in downtown Baltimore about five years ago, but he hasn't exactly been a gym rat. "I work out for two weeks and I'll take off for eight months," the 38-year-old social worker said. So like many other Americans, Bayne resolved to get healthy in 2012. He spent New Year's Day at the gym, hopping onto the treadmill for a 60-minute walk. He hopes to gain energy and improve his health as approaches "the big 4-0," he said. "I don't feel as healthy as I used to feel," Bayne said.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | March 21, 1995
By now, most women are familiar with the benefits of regular exercise in preventing heart disease, strengthening bones, lessening back pain and warding off other chronic diseases. What isn't well-known is something researchers have suspected for years: that exercise plays a strong role in preventing certain types of cancer, including breast cancer.Recent research from the University of Southern California School of Medicine indicates that women who exercise regularly during childbearing years can significantly reduce their risk of developing malignant breast tumors.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 2, 1993
Two large new studies have provided the strongest evidence yet that a sudden burst of physical activity can set off a heart attack. But even more important, the studies showed a strong protective effect of regular physical activity.Over all, the risk of a heart attack during or just after heavy physical exertion is two to six times greater than the risk during less strenuous activities or no activity, the studies showed. But regular physical activity diminished the added risk to practically none at all.Normally sedentary people who try something strenuous like shoveling snow, sprinting to catch a bus, playing tennis or pushing a car out of a snowdrift are especially at risk.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
Holiday giving means a healthier community We reap positive health benefits during the holidays when we watch what we eat and get more rest and exercise. Likewise, countless worthy charitable organizations will reap the year-round benefits of reliable and consistent financial support when we all apply a few simple principles of "healthy" holiday giving. An excellent way to pace ourselves in giving is to participate in an employee workplace giving campaign through payroll deduction. If that is not an option, we can make a regular monthly contribution to the charity or charities of our choice.
FEATURES
By Carolyn Poirot and Carolyn Poirot,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | February 24, 1998
Now that consumers are beginning to understand the benefits of regular exercise, the American Council on Exercise wants us to know we can well afford to tone up -- even on the tightest of budgets. The council took a survey of 3,000 fitness professionals to find the best (and worst) fitness product you can buy for less than $20.The bestResistance tubing and bands: Convenient, easy to use and compact enough to take with you anywhere, resistance bands are a great way to strengthen and tone all the major muscle groups.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 13, 2012
Many Americans aren't exercising despite all the health messages about obesity and staying in shape, according to a new survey. The report by the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association found that 68.2 million people, or nearly 24 percent of people surveyed, were inactive in 2011. That means that they didn't participate in 119 activities, such as swimming and basketball, identified by the organization.  The number of inactive adults jumped 1.6 pecent from the prior year and 8 percent over the past three years.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 1996
How can you constructively criticize what and how much your child is eating? I am very concerned that my 14-year-old son will grow up to be as heavy as I am.You are probably already aware that most teen-agers are very sensitive about their physical appearance. Hence, we would caution you not to single him out for criticism about his diet even though such criticism may come from a desire to help him. Instead, we believe it may be more healthy if you frame your comments within the context of planning meals to keep the whole family healthy.
NEWS
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,kevin.eck@baltsun.com | September 22, 2008
After battling obesity and other health issues for years, Arthur Boorman finally bottomed out. Literally. Boorman, a Brooklyn resident and special education teacher at Severna Park High School, was working with a student at the youngster's home about two years ago, when the chair that he was sitting on collapsed under his 5-foot-6, 340-pound frame. Unable to walk without the use of canes because of problems with his legs and back, the Gulf War veteran and former Army paratrooper realized after the humiliating experience that he needed to reverse his downward spiral.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
Holiday giving means a healthier community We reap positive health benefits during the holidays when we watch what we eat and get more rest and exercise. Likewise, countless worthy charitable organizations will reap the year-round benefits of reliable and consistent financial support when we all apply a few simple principles of "healthy" holiday giving. An excellent way to pace ourselves in giving is to participate in an employee workplace giving campaign through payroll deduction. If that is not an option, we can make a regular monthly contribution to the charity or charities of our choice.
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | September 20, 2007
Carolyn Forwood, a retired salesclerk and beautician, believes in regular exercise for body and brain. The 68-year-old Parkville resident does crossword puzzles every day. She took up yoga a few months ago, and she works out on the treadmills and stationary bikes in the new fitness room at the Parkville Senior Center three to four times a week. She also volunteers part time as a senior center receptionist and spends as much time as possible with her three daughters and two stepdaughters.
NEWS
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | February 9, 2007
They may never pull a locomotive with their toes, but a few intrepid fitness pioneers are diligently exercising their feet with the dedication of true believers. And they may be on to something. Many podiatrists believe that putting feet through a simple exercise regimen designed to build up foot strength and flexibility can save some people a world of hurt. "A lot of injuries we see can be prevented if you have stronger feet," says Dr. Noreen Oswell, chief of podiatric surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.
NEWS
December 23, 2002
YOU RUN six miles, pump iron for an hour, then read the paper over a tofu and veggie lunch to discover that two guys younger and fitter just died while working out. What's the point of all the sweat and sacrifice? It can't be living longer. According to reporting by The Sun's Jonathan Bor, longevity is a crapshoot affected by so many factors that it's impossible to control them all. Regular exercise probably improves the odds of a lengthy lifespan for most people. But there are no guarantees.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and Jane E. Allen,Special to the Sun | October 21, 2001
We are constantly reminded that 30 minutes of exercise several times a week is crucial to good health and long life. But what happens if you're one of the millions of older Americans who suffer from arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, osteoporosis or some other physically limiting condition? You may be trapped at home, shut out of traditional gyms and health clubs, too discouraged or too depressed to challenge yourself with movement. "They're the forgotten people," said Karl G. Knopf, president of the Fitness Educators of Older Adults Association.
NEWS
December 23, 2002
YOU RUN six miles, pump iron for an hour, then read the paper over a tofu and veggie lunch to discover that two guys younger and fitter just died while working out. What's the point of all the sweat and sacrifice? It can't be living longer. According to reporting by The Sun's Jonathan Bor, longevity is a crapshoot affected by so many factors that it's impossible to control them all. Regular exercise probably improves the odds of a lengthy lifespan for most people. But there are no guarantees.
FEATURES
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 6, 1998
People stare at Kurt Taylor. At his arms. At his chest. Little do they know that the 33-year-old Baltimore chef used to be "kinda skinny."Taylor made a workout plan, started out slowly and stuck with it, and now enjoys both the physical bulk and mental benefits.He starts each day with a secret ingredient: oatmeal. Oatmeal is a nutritious meal that the body burns quickly, Taylor says, adding, commercial-like, that it doesn't have to taste bland. He sweetens it with honey, brown sugar, bananas and raisins - he is a chef, after all.His workout, from 8 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., wraps around his work schedule at Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | January 31, 1999
As a retired social worker, Clara Gordon just can't resist helping people. At Leadenhall Baptist Church in Baltimore, she teaches Sunday school, is active in church affairs, sings in the choir and reaches out to people in need. She enjoys traveling, too, and is planning a Florida trip to sing with the church choir in Daytona Beach.But maybe she helps people best by serving as an example of the importance of a lifelong devotion to fitness -- because at 82, Gordon still is faithful to her fitness routine.
FEATURES
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 6, 1998
People stare at Kurt Taylor. At his arms. At his chest. Little do they know that the 33-year-old Baltimore chef used to be "kinda skinny."Taylor made a workout plan, started out slowly and stuck with it, and now enjoys both the physical bulk and mental benefits.He starts each day with a secret ingredient: oatmeal. Oatmeal is a nutritious meal that the body burns quickly, Taylor says, adding, commercial-like, that it doesn't have to taste bland. He sweetens it with honey, brown sugar, bananas and raisins - he is a chef, after all.His workout, from 8 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., wraps around his work schedule at Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville.
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