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By MIKE LITTWIN | March 20, 1996
FOR DAYS, I watched the "60 Minutes" promos of the show's interview with Muhammad Ali. Even now, Ali can dependably draw an audience. But when it came time, well, I just couldn't bring myself to tune in.Sundays can be sad enough without watching one of your few remaining heroes losing his struggle with Parkinson's syndrome.What's sadder still is that his condition is apparently the result, in his post-float-like-a-butterfly years, of taking too many punches to the head.As he used to remind us, he was the greatest.
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NEWS
August 7, 2014
I read recently that Gov. Martin O'Malley is considering a run for the Oval Office ( "O'Malley headed back to New Hampshire," Aug. 5). Shame on him. Let him stay in Maryland. A recent article stated that nearly 50 percent of Marylanders would opt to relocate to another state. I am one of them. I moved to Maryland in 2006 and always thought it was a great state for opportunity. But with the high taxes and extreme liberalism, I left. When I moved there, I was surprised at how complete strangers thought I should be responsible for their kids and how the state of Maryland did nothing to women who were willing to dump their kids on total strangers.
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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- A teen-ager from northwestern Pennsylvania who killed a deer with his bare hands now says he has regrets.Not about beating the nine-point buck to a pulp in a fit of road rage. That, he says, was a "mercy killing."What he regrets is admitting to his small-town newspaper that he "wanted to beat the crap out of it" after his car rammed the animal.Five days after wrestling the deer to its death, 11th-grader Brian Krepp, 18, has become a celebrity of sorts in rural Venango County, Pa. -- the kind of place where it's far more common to find a deer head over the fireplace mantel than attached to a buck that has been strangled on the side of the road.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Del. Jon S. Cardin expressed remorse Thursday for missing nearly 75 percent of his committee votes this year but said the votes he missed generally weren't close, and he needed to spend time with his pregnant wife and young daughter. "I certainly regret missing the votes that I did," the Baltimore Democrat said in a telephone interview. "But I remain quite proud of the work I got done. " Cardin, who leads in polls for the Democratic nomination to become Maryland's next attorney general, said he spent more than 1,000 hours working over the 90-day session, had a near-perfect voting record on the House floor, and led passage of legislation that included a bill criminalizing online sexual harassment known as "revenge porn.
NEWS
May 6, 2008
The The Beth Tfiloh Congregation deeply regrets the passing of Jack Amster
NEWS
September 2, 2009
The Beth Tfiloh Congregation deeply regrets the passing of our Member David Skurnik
NEWS
November 19, 2009
The Beth Tfiloh Congregation deeply regrets the passing of Jerome Gross,
NEWS
October 2, 2009
The Beth Tfiloh Congregation deeply regrets the passing of Mannie Rabovsky
NEWS
June 30, 2009
The Beth Tfiloh Congregation deeply regrets the passing of Bronia Rotholz,
NEWS
February 6, 2009
The Beth Tfiloh Congregation deeply regrets the passing of our member, Howard Rubenstein
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
NEW YORK -  Orioles center fielder Adam Jones, whose postgame comments Tuesday about fans who run onto the field during games sparked national headlines, said Wednesday that he doesn't regret that he said players should be able to “kick them with our metal spikes,” and police should “tase the living [heck] out of them.” A day after making the remarks, Jones said he meant no harm by his comments, but he still stood by his words. Jones' comments were being reviewed by Major League Baseball on Wednesday, an MLB spokesperson told The Baltimore Sun. “My comments weren't malicious or anything like that,” Jones said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
In the wake of Howard County Police saying definitively Wednesday that there was no "domestic" motive for the Columbia Mall shooting in January that left three people dead, WBAL apologized for its reporting on the story. Most of that bad reporting came from John Patti, an anchor and reporter at WBAL Radio. His erroneous reports were also carried on WBAL-TV. “Columbia Mall shooting domestic. Former boyfriend of Zumiez clerk shot her and new boyfriend also an employee of store," Patti tweeted on Jan. 25. Patti reported more details of an alleged relationship on WBAL-TV, saying “this is indeed a domestic incident” and that the two victims were “engaged to be married.” But none of it was true, according the report from the Howard County Police today.
NEWS
By Matteo Faini | January 7, 2014
Fifty years ago, Harry Truman wrote an article in the Washington Post expressing his disappointment over what the Central Intelligence Agency had become. He had established the CIA in 1947 to provide his office with objective information. But it had since "been diverted from its original assignment," Truman wrote, and "become an operational and at times a policy-making arm of the government ... injected into peacetime cloak and dagger operations. " He wanted the CIA to be restored to its original intelligence function and asked "that its operational duties be terminated or properly used elsewhere.
SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
When it comes to college football bowls, the Military Bowl in Annapolis may not seem like the most exciting of opportunities for Maryland, with the game a short bus ride away. Not to mention that the Dec. 27 date means the Terps will spend Christmas away from their families as they prepare to play Marshall. But these concerns prove to be advantages for both the program and the players, Terps coach Randy Edsall said at a news conference at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium on Thursday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Many college basketball coaches have some degree of autonomy over their regular-season schedule, and they usually try to use that power to their team's advantage. Jamion Christian took a different approach, having his Mount St. Mary's team open this season with five straight road games. The team has lost its first four, and will try to end the skid with a win at UMES on Wednesday night, but Christian said he does not regret how he arranged the opening portion of the schedule. “I really like to challenge our team early in the year,” the second-year coach said Tuesday night.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson | October 2, 2013
Outspoken by nature, rush outside linebacker Terrell Suggs held nothing back during an ESPN interview taped months ago and aired Monday where he suggested NFL commissioner Roger Goodell had a hand in the power outage during Super Bowl XLVII.  However, no evidence has surfaced to suggest a conspiracy. Suggs called Goodell overpaid and insinuated that he favors certain teams, including the Denver Broncos. And the 2011 NFL Defensive Player of the Year took another verbal shot at a frequent foil: New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.
NEWS
September 2, 2009
The Beth Tfiloh Congregation deeply regrets the passing of our Member Bernard Mazur
NEWS
July 9, 2009
The Beth Tfiloh Congregation deeply regrets the passing of our Member Sylvia Carmel
NEWS
September 19, 2013
Unlike Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, we do have regrets regarding the wisdom of sponsoring the Baltimore Grand Prix and similar events ( "Rawlings-Blake: No regrets on the Grand Prix," Sept. 16). First, let's be clear. The Baltimore portrayed in "The Wire" is the clearest picture of what has been happening in this city for decades. It is a bitter pill to swallow. We've lived in Baltimore for 45 years, almost half a century. During this period we have served over a million meals, distributed at least 650 tons of non-perishable food to our neighbors and seen the suffering continue unabated.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | September 16, 2013
Three years ago, I declared that the Grand Prix of Baltimore would be a game changer for our city. Now that the race has ended for the foreseeable future, many have asked if I regret that statement. The answer is no. My goal in supporting the Grand Prix was to boost Baltimore's tourism industry over a traditionally slow Labor Day weekend and to present a positive image of our city to the world. For three years, the Grand Prix of Baltimore did exactly that. Race On, the race's organizers, positioned the Grand Prix for long-term success, and it is bittersweet to see this event come to an end. The Grand Prix attracted national and international exposure - shining a positive spotlight on Baltimore and broadcasting images of our beautiful harbor and downtown business district to households across the globe.
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