Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRegistered Voters
IN THE NEWS

Registered Voters

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
Michael T. Brown, who wanted to run for city council as an independent in Ward 6, does not have enough valid signatures on the petition for candidacy he submitted in July, the city Election Board ruled yesterday.A review by the board's administrator found that only 88 of the 130 people who signed petitions supporting Brown's candidacy were registered voters when they signed the petitions, according to Deborah Heinbuch, election administrator.City code requires at least 100 valid signatures.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Howard County residents have tried four times in the past nine years to challenge local government decisions on taxes and land use by referendum and failed each time to get the questions on the ballot. They've been rebuffed by opinions of the county's law department and by the courts, getting hung up on legal technicalities and the details of how signatures are validated. As difficult as it is to put a question on the local ballot, the bar would rise a bit higher if voters on Election Day approve one particular county charter revision, one of five changes proposed this year.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
Councilman Warren Branch and write-in candidate Shannon Sneed, vying for the City Council seat representing District 13, shared a small patch of sidewalk turf outside Fort Worthington Elementary on Oliver Street in east Baltimore. They shook hands, gave out fliers and called out to the trickle of voters who headed into the school as city voters headed to the polls Tuesday to cast their ballots in the city's general election. "It's been like they predicted — slow," Sneed said, as she handed out cards with directions for voters to complete a write-in ballot.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Voter turnout for the presidential primary Tuesday was Maryland's lowest in at least 32 years. About 21 percent of registered voters cast a ballot Tuesday, according to early tallies from the Maryland Board of Elections. That figure does not include absentee and provisional ballots, which may push up the final total, but officials said turnout won't reach 25 percent. That is the previous record low — set in 1996 — in the 32 years for which statewide records are available. "Voters know when there's a real election and when there's not a real election," said John Willis, a political science professor at the University of Baltimore and former Maryland secretary of state.
NEWS
October 19, 1994
1,300 additional voters register since primaryAbout 1,300 more Carroll County residents have registered to vote since the Sept. 13 primary, according to unofficial statistics from the Board of Supervisors of Elections.In that time period, Republican registration outnumbered Democrat registration by more than 3 to 1.The deadline to register to vote in the Nov. 8 general election was Oct. 11.As of yesterday, the county had 64,455 registered voters.Republicans outnumbered Democrats by 3,848 voters.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 15, 1992
President Bush heads into tonight's second presidential debate with a still daunting challenge: The latest New York Times-CBS News Poll shows that Gov. Bill Clinton retains an undiminished lead and is actually viewed more favorably by the voters despite recent Republican pounding.The survey, conducted Monday and Tuesday nights, shows that Ross Perot made some gains in the voters' esteem after the first presidential debate Sunday night. But he still lags far behind the two major-party candidates heading into the second confrontation tonight in Richmond.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 8, 2008
Voter turnout in Maryland was not as overwhelming as expected. About 76 percent of registered voters headed to the polls or voted absentee, far short of the projected 85 percent turnout that would have set a record and that elections officials had predicted. The number of ballots cast, however, did reach a high of 2.6 million, according to the Maryland State Board of Elections. Only 66 percent of registered voters in Baltimore City turned out, according to preliminary data. Turnout was higher in Baltimore County, at 75 percent.
NEWS
August 26, 1992
In a spot survey of state offices, the American Civil Liberties Union found only sparse compliance with a law requiring state agencies to make voter registration forms available to the public."
NEWS
September 14, 1998
FOUR YEARS AGO, voter turnout in Anne Arundel was abysmal. Of 184,094 registered voters, 41 percent turned out for the primary.No one expects the figure to improve much tomorrow, reflecting the general apathy of the American electorate. Only about half of the people old enough to vote in the county bother to register in the first place.A closer look at the 1994 turnout is even more disturbing: Only about 22 percent of young adults, ages 18 to 35, who were registered to vote did so. People older than 35 cast 86 percent of all votes in the last primary.
NEWS
September 2, 1997
CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE Lawrence H. Rushworth made the only decision the law allowed when he disqualified three Annapolis aldermanic candidates from the Sept. 16 ballot.Although the candidates met the residency requirements, they had not been registered voters long enough in the wards they sought to represent. In light of Judge Rushworth's decision, the council should re-examine this provision of the city charter.Voters -- rather than mandates in the city charter -- should determine suitability for public office.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
Councilman Warren Branch and write-in candidate Shannon Sneed, vying for the City Council seat representing District 13, shared a small patch of sidewalk turf outside Fort Worthington Elementary on Oliver Street in east Baltimore. They shook hands, gave out fliers and called out to the trickle of voters who headed into the school as city voters headed to the polls Tuesday to cast their ballots in the city's general election. "It's been like they predicted — slow," Sneed said, as she handed out cards with directions for voters to complete a write-in ballot.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Maryland primary voters hit the polls Friday for the state's first-ever experience with early voting — a dry run, candidates and election officials say, for the weeklong voting period before the general election in November. The new system has cast office-seekers in the role of de facto educators, explaining the process to voters. Many also include early voting information in their campaign literature and have begun mentioning it in automated phone calls to voters. Many, including the governor and his chief competitor, hope to lead by example by casting their own votes early.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 8, 2008
Voter turnout in Maryland was not as overwhelming as expected. About 76 percent of registered voters headed to the polls or voted absentee, far short of the projected 85 percent turnout that would have set a record and that elections officials had predicted. The number of ballots cast, however, did reach a high of 2.6 million, according to the Maryland State Board of Elections. Only 66 percent of registered voters in Baltimore City turned out, according to preliminary data. Turnout was higher in Baltimore County, at 75 percent.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Melissa Harris and Scott Calvert and Melissa Harris,scott.calvert@baltsun.com and melissa.harris@baltsun.com | November 5, 2008
The polls weren't even open early yesterday when Heru-ka Anu began to rally his fellow voters. Anu, who said he had been waiting with his wife at the head of the line at Baltimore's Dickey Hill Elementary School since 4:30 a.m., led a chant of Barack Obama's campaign slogan, "Yes, We Can." Moments later, his wife Nana emerged from the voting booth with her thumbs poking skyward. "Yes," she exclaimed, "we did!" Across the Baltimore region and beyond, a crush of voters queued up early, often enduring waits of an hour or more with little if any complaint.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 3, 2008
By the time polls open tomorrow morning, officials predict that as many as 35 percent of Florida voters already will have cast ballots via early voting or absentee ballot. Good thing. That's nearly 4 million people who can stay away while the rest of the state's Nov. 4 electorate - an estimated 5.6 million people - votes the old-fashioned way: at the precinct polling place. Early and absentee voters have relieved pressure on polling places in advance of what many say will be a monumental turnout.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,david.nitkin@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
Maryland officials are urging voters to double-check precinct locations so their ballots are counted on Election Day, when an exceptionally high turnout is expected. State elections administrator Linda H. Lamone said yesterday that nine out of 10 registered voters might turn out Nov. 4 in some parts of the state, and she expects a statewide participation rate of about 85 percent. That would eclipse the most recent high of 81 percent in 1992. Four years ago, 78 percent of registered voters went to the polls.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,david.nitkin@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
Maryland officials are urging voters to double-check precinct locations so their ballots are counted on Election Day, when an exceptionally high turnout is expected. State elections administrator Linda H. Lamone said yesterday that nine out of 10 registered voters might turn out Nov. 4 in some parts of the state, and she expects a statewide participation rate of about 85 percent. That would eclipse the most recent high of 81 percent in 1992. Four years ago, 78 percent of registered voters went to the polls.
NEWS
August 13, 1991
Voter registration surged slightly in the past few weeks, but there will be far fewer Baltimoreans eligible to cast votes in the Sept. 12 primary than four years ago.Registration closed last night for the primary. Final numbers will not be ready for at least a week, but as of Aug. 3, the city had 320,922 registered voters. Included in that number are 278,193 Democrats and 30,207 Republicans. The remaining registrants are independents or members of minor parties.Those numbers are a far cry from the 392,817 voters who were registered for the 1987 primary.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
Harford County residents are registering to vote in record numbers, often as many as 500 daily in the days preceding the registration deadline at 9 p.m. Tuesday. The heightened interest has officials predicting an unprecedented 90 percent turnout on Nov. 4. The Board of Elections will remain open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. tomorrow, the Columbus Day holiday, and Tuesday to accommodate what officials expect to be a crush of last-minute registrations. "Typically, registration goes up in a presidential election, when there is always more interest," said James E. Massey, director of Harford's Board of Elections.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
James Massey, director of the Harford County Board of Elections, typically carries voter registration forms with him. They came in handy last week when he went to the barbershop. Before his trim was complete Thursday, he had given out all the forms - to the barber, the receptionist and a few other customers. "I call it voter outreach," said Massey, whose staff is handling nearly 500 new registration forms a day. "It has been frenetic. A lot of people are saying that they want to vote this year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.