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Registered To Vote

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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2004
Disputing claims that Mayor Martin O'Malley has a "carpetbagger Cabinet," Baltimore officials said yesterday that only four of the 17 people named in a lawsuit must by law live and be registered to vote in the city - and that those four meet the requirements. But Frank M. Conaway, the Baltimore mayoral candidate and Circuit Court clerk behind the suit, was not backing down. He contends that under the city charter, O'Malley must fire some of his top aides - including his police commissioner - because they belatedly moved or registered to vote in the city.
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NEWS
June 3, 2014
Marylanders have until 9:00 tonight to register to vote in the June 24 primary. That is also the deadline to change party affiliation, update an address or request an alternate polling place. State election officials said voters can register online or go to their local boards, which will be open until 9 p.m. Voters also can mail in a voter registration application, which must be postmarked today. At the election office, voters will be asked to list their driver's license or state identification number, or provide the last four digits of their Social Security Number.
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NEWS
By Katherine Marks and Katherine Marks,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 8, 1996
Yesterday's voter-registration deadline saw a last-minute surge of voters filling out registration forms at post offices, the Motor Vehicle Administration and the Howard County Board of Elections office.U.S. Postal Service workers at the Columbia post office on Oak Hall Lane said they were handing out forms all day to people taking advantage of their last opportunity to register.About 2: 30 p.m., three hours before the post office closed, customer service supervisor Donna Chappell said she would have to ask the Board of Elections for more registration forms.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Today is the deadline to register to vote in Maryland in the Nov. 6 election. You can register online until 9 p.m. at elections.state.md.us/voter_registration/ . To register online, you must have a Maryland driver's license or a state-issued ID. You also can register at your local board of elections or the state board of elections until 9 p.m. During regular business hours, you can register at some state agencies, including the Department of Health...
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff Writer Staff writers Carol L. Bowers, Larry Carson, John A. Morris and Erik Nelson contributed to this article | March 4, 1992
Excuses. You could buy them for a dime a dozen from citizens who, for one reason or another, chose not to vote yesterday.From Harford County to Harundale, thousands of people eligible to vote stayed away from the polls, saying they were either too busy, too disillusioned, too confused or just plain didn't care."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | October 21, 1992
Carroll County residents have decided their votes count.About 10,600 more residents are registered to vote than in the last presidential election. Most of those potential voters registered after the March primary.A total of 65,344 voters are registered in the county, compared with 54,752 in 1988, numbers from the county elections board show.In the March primary, 56,503 people were registered to vote in Carroll, meaning 8,841 people registered to vote in the Nov. 3 election.County Republican and Democratic leaders say they've made strong efforts to register voters.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | February 2, 2008
Seventeen-year-olds, who recently won the right to vote in Maryland primaries, are also entitled to cast ballots in nonpartisan elections, an Anne Arundel County judge ruled yesterday. The decision by Judge Paul A. Hackner will allow teenagers who will turn 18 by the Nov. 4 general election and who registered to vote by last month's deadline to have a say in local school board and District Court judge races taking place Feb. 12. His order is at odds with Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who determined last month that the state constitution does not allow for early voters to partake in nonpartisan elections, including ballot questions.
NEWS
July 30, 1997
ANNAPOLIS' Board of Elections wisely decided to allow three candidates for City Council to remain on the ballot even though they may not have met the technical qualifications for listing.The names of James M. Conley, a Democrat in Ward 7; Timothy T. Troutner, a Republican in Ward 5, and Michael Hay, a Ward 8 Republican, will appear on the Sept. 16 primary ballot. It will now be up to the voters or others to challenge their qualifications.For any candidate running for city office, the most important qualification is that they be residents of the city wards they wish to represent.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | August 26, 1992
In a spot survey of state offices, the American Civil Liberties Union found only sparse compliance with a law requiring state agencies to make voter registration forms available to the public."
NEWS
April 5, 1999
Union Bridge residents who wish to vote in the 1999 town election may register until April 12.Registered residents will vote for mayor and two council members. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. May 11 at Town Hall, 104 W. Locust St.Residents who are registered with the county to vote in county, state and federal elections are automatically registered to vote in town elections.Those who wish to vote in the town election only may register from 8 a.m. to 4: 30 p.m. weekdays at Town Hall.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
Until a few weeks ago, University of Maryland junior Tali Alter was registered to vote in her home state of Illinois. But the 21-year-old psychology major was eager to cast a ballot in this state in favor of same-sex marriage and in-state tuition for some illegal immigrants. With a few keystrokes and a click of a mouse, Alter registered to vote online through a newly created university website. "It took me less than a minute to fill out," said Alter, a member of the College Park campus' student government.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Too little attention to security of votes My voting experience on Tuesday gave me reason to be extremely concerned about the integrity of the Maryland voting results ("Making history," Nov. 5). When I arrived at the voting reception station in my local precinct in Severn, I extracted my voter registration card from my wallet and attempted to offer it to the reception clerk. The clerk would not take it but instead verbally asked for my name, address and date of birth. Thinking that this was a preliminary check to see if I was registered to vote, I quickly offered this information.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
A record number of Marylanders are expected to vote today. Here are answers to some common questions and tips on how to zip in and out of the polls. Am I registered to vote? And if so, where am I registered? To find out, go to the Maryland State Board of Elections Web site: www.elections.state.md.us. Click on the "FIND OUT HERE" link at the top of the page. Then, click on "Name Search" and fill in your name, date of birth and ZIP code. If you're registered, your name, address and precinct information will appear.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
A record number of Marylanders are expected to vote Tuesday. Here are answers to common questions and tips on how to zip in and out of the polls. 1. Am I registered to vote? And if so, where am I registered? To find out, go to the Maryland State Board of Elections Web site: www.elections.state.md.us. Click on the "FIND OUT HERE" link at the top of the page. Then, click on "Name Search" and fill in your name, date of birth and ZIP code. If you're registered, your name, address and precinct information will appear.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | February 2, 2008
Seventeen-year-olds, who recently won the right to vote in Maryland primaries, are also entitled to cast ballots in nonpartisan elections, an Anne Arundel County judge ruled yesterday. The decision by Judge Paul A. Hackner will allow teenagers who will turn 18 by the Nov. 4 general election and who registered to vote by last month's deadline to have a say in local school board and District Court judge races taking place Feb. 12. His order is at odds with Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who determined last month that the state constitution does not allow for early voters to partake in nonpartisan elections, including ballot questions.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun Reporter | January 26, 2008
Brittany Harris was determined. The 17-year-old skipped out on her after-school hospital internship, went straight home, waited for her mother, then got a lift to the Board of Elections office in downtown Baltimore. Two hours before the voter registration deadline, she triumphantly filled out an application. Come Feb. 12, she will be able to vote in Maryland's Democratic primary. If Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton or Sen. Barack Obama become president, "it would be historic," she said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 13, 2000
At least 166 people attempted to vote illegally in Broward and Palm Beach counties during elections in 1996 and 1998, according to records. Of those, at least 44 succeeded in bypassing a system riddled with holes and cast ballots unlawfully, according to election records from both counties. None of the 166 - whether they voted or were denied a ballot - appears to have been prosecuted, although lying in such cases is a felony. Some of the illegal votes were cast by felons whose civil rights had not been restored.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- In what political analysts say is the greatest expansion of voter rolls in the nation's history, more than 5 million Americans have registered to vote in the eight months since the National Voter Registration Act was enacted.Several states report that the act -- called the "Motor Voter Law" because it permits people to register while obtaining a driving permit -- has generated threefold increases, and greater, in the pace of registrations compared with earlier years."There's never been a massive registration like this in such a brief period in all of the country's political history," said Lloyd Leonard, an elections specialist for the League of WomenVoters, a national organization that promotes voting.
NEWS
By Rona Marech | January 24, 2008
More than 11,000 17-year-olds have registered to vote in Maryland and are eligible to participate in the state's Feb. 12 presidential primary if they turn 18 before the general election, officials say. By noon yesterday, 11,252 17-year-old voters - including 6,009 Democrats and 3,162 Republicans - had registered, said Roger Stitt of the State Board of Elections. Because local boards are sifting through paperwork and mailed applications are still arriving, final figures won't be available for several days, Stitt said.
NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | August 6, 2006
FOR NEARLY TWO hours, the arena-sized church on Primrose Avenue in Northwest Baltimore rocked with rhythmic fury. Its crowd of more than 2,000 danced, sang and clapped in cadence. Its charismatic young pastor and founder bellowed a powerful message that often brought the crowd to its feet. Then it was time for the Rev. Jamal-Harrison Bryant to wrap up his sermon and extend invitation to Empowerment Temple African Methodist Episcopal, the megachurch he founded six years ago with 43 members that has grown to more than 10,000.
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