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NEWS
February 1, 2008
Maryland primary Maryland's presidential primary elections take place Feb. 12. Only registered Republicans may vote in the GOP primary, and only registered Democrats may vote in the Democratic primary.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | August 2, 2009
Running for public office in a district where your party is a minority is always tough, but registered Democrats now enjoy a slight edge in Republican-dominated District 9a, covering western Howard County and Ellicott City. Republicans hold all the public offices in District 9a, but since the last state and local elections in 2006, registered Democrats have slipped past the Grand Old Party, 26,434 to 25,666 as of July 21. There are also 12,427 unaffiliated or other voters, including one registered Whig, according to election board records.
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NEWS
September 10, 2002
Registered Democrats and Republicans can vote in their party primaries today. Polls across the state open at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. More information on your local polling place is available from the state election board at 800-222-8683 or its Web site, www.elections.state. md.us.
NEWS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,rick.maese@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
SALISBURY - The eagerness echoed with each door knock. At the first stop on Church Street, no one answered the door, and the man in the backyard said he didn't speak English. So Chuck Cook, hungry for a score, gave brief chase after a car stopped at a traffic light. Nearby, at the home of Tina Moore, the woman who answered the door didn't mince words: Moore had passed away. "Well," said Cook, a Wicomico County Democratic Club worker, after a pause. "Are you registered to vote, ma'am?" The persistence of Cook and scores of other volunteers from both parties has been on display as they try to enroll as many new voters as possible before next week's Maryland registration deadline.
NEWS
September 13, 2007
Mayor Sheila Dixon's humility in the face of victory may seem curious since she overwhelmingly defeated her closest opponent. But when you look at the numbers, the mayor won Tuesday's primary with the votes of less than a fifth of registered Democrats. Turnout was low, and some say not unusually so, but it shouldn't be forgotten in the post-primary euphoria of Ms. Dixon's win. She has her work cut out for her, and energizing the electorate should be high on her list. According to city election board estimates, nearly 31 percent of Baltimore's registered Democrats cast ballots, lower than the figures from 2003 and from 1999, when 49 percent turned out for a contentious three-way primary race for mayor.
NEWS
October 26, 1992
More Marylanders -- 67.7 percent of the voting-age population -- have registered to vote Nov. 3 than at any time since the 1984 general election.And while Republicans have been steadily increasing the number of their registered voters in the past four years, Maryland still has more than twice as many registered Democrats -- 1.5 million -- as registered Republicans (717,703). Moreover, the pace of Democratic registration quickened demonstrably in most Maryland jurisdictions after the two parties' presidential nominating conventions this summer.
NEWS
October 26, 1992
More Marylanders -- 67.7 percent of the voting-age population -- have registered to vote a week from tomorrow than at any time since the 1984 general election.And while Republicans have been steadily increasing the number of their registered voters in many jurisdictions, including in Anne Arundel County, Maryland still has more than twice as many registered Democrats (1.5 million) as registered Republicans (717,703). Moreover, the pace of Democratic registration quickened demonstrably after the two parties' national conventions this summer.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | September 12, 1990
Registered Republican voters maintained an edge over Democrats in Carroll entering yesterday's primary, for the first time since the election office began keeping records in the mid-1950s.County Democratic leaders say the latest figures finally represent a more accurate picture of the way Carroll residents have voted for years -- about evenly split between the two parties.Republican officials view the turnabout as a clear sign of the GOP's surging popularity, voter registration efforts and increased potential for success at the polls.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | February 26, 1992
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. -- No better example is needed of the folly of the presidential nomination process as now constituted than the farce of the South Dakota primary just concluded.Voters here were treated to the equivalent of a game of flash cardstheir neighbor state, spent most of one week campaigning here, as did the involuntary stealth candidate, former Irvine, Calif., Mayor Larry Agran, admitted to a televised presidential debate for the first time.But the others -- Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas, former Sen. Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts and former Gov. Jerry Brown of California -- breezed in and out like the winter wind that whistles across South Dakota's dreary prairies.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
Voters in Districts 30 and 33 winnowed a crowded field of candidates running for the House of Delegates, selecting incumbents and well-known county politicians.In the only contested Senate race, Republican Mary M. Rose, 48, one-term clerk of the court, won 70 percent of the vote, easily defeating lawyer and businessman Robert J. O'Neill for the District 30 nomination.She will face Del. John C. Astle, who was unopposed in the Democratic primary.The seat became vacant when Sen. Gerald W. Winegrad decided not to seek re-election.
NEWS
February 1, 2008
Maryland primary Maryland's presidential primary elections take place Feb. 12. Only registered Republicans may vote in the GOP primary, and only registered Democrats may vote in the Democratic primary.
NEWS
September 13, 2007
Mayor Sheila Dixon's humility in the face of victory may seem curious since she overwhelmingly defeated her closest opponent. But when you look at the numbers, the mayor won Tuesday's primary with the votes of less than a fifth of registered Democrats. Turnout was low, and some say not unusually so, but it shouldn't be forgotten in the post-primary euphoria of Ms. Dixon's win. She has her work cut out for her, and energizing the electorate should be high on her list. According to city election board estimates, nearly 31 percent of Baltimore's registered Democrats cast ballots, lower than the figures from 2003 and from 1999, when 49 percent turned out for a contentious three-way primary race for mayor.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Childs Walker and Sumathi Reddy and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2005
The radio ads attacking the Anne Arundel Democratic senators focused on medical malpractice and higher education funding. But the subtext was clear. With elections two years away, the state Republican Party is already eyeing Anne Arundel County, fertile ground for gains in an area that is increasingly among its most reliable strongholds. "Anne Arundel is one of those Maryland communities to really watch with great political interest," said Keith Haller, president of Potomac Inc., a Bethesda-based public opinion research firm.
NEWS
September 10, 2002
Registered Democrats and Republicans can vote in their party primaries today. Polls across the state open at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. More information on your local polling place is available from the state election board at 800-222-8683 or its Web site, www.elections.state. md.us.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
James G. Fitzgerald got only 826 votes - 21.5 percent of the vote - when he ran four years ago for the Democratic nomination for the District 2 seat on the Howard County Council. It seemed a pitiful showing then, but if the 48-year-old software engineer does just as well in the primary election this September, he could win the race in a redrawn district that covers most of east Columbia and parts of Elkridge and Jessup. That's because another low-turnout election is expected, and if the four Democrats running this year have to split the fewer than 4,000 votes cast in 1998, anyone could win the nomination.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2000
Independent voters, so crucial in the New Hampshire primary, where all the presidential candidates tried to win their votes, will be wooed only by Republicans in Maryland -- with an unknown impact. On March 7, the 12.4 percent of Maryland's approximately 2.6 million registered voters who have not declared their political allegiance will be allowed to cast Republican ballots, but only registered Democrats can vote for the Democratic presidential nominee. The open primary pleases supporters of Republican John McCain and leaves backers of Democrat Bill Bradley wishing their party had adopted a similar measure.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | August 2, 2009
Running for public office in a district where your party is a minority is always tough, but registered Democrats now enjoy a slight edge in Republican-dominated District 9a, covering western Howard County and Ellicott City. Republicans hold all the public offices in District 9a, but since the last state and local elections in 2006, registered Democrats have slipped past the Grand Old Party, 26,434 to 25,666 as of July 21. There are also 12,427 unaffiliated or other voters, including one registered Whig, according to election board records.
NEWS
July 16, 1991
State Sen. George W. Della's decision yesterday to drop out of the City Council president's race was no big surprise to those who thought the South Baltimore politician was playing games by becoming a last-minute candidate July 5. But to thousands of Democratic voters in Baltimore City, his pullout is a major disappointment. With Mary Pat Clarke, the incumbent, now facing only token primary opposition, her record and behavior as the city's No. 2 official will not get the kind of full probing it deserves.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 18, 1997
CABIN JOHN -- Ralph G. Neas, a longtime civil rights activist, announced yesterday that he would seek to represent Montgomery County in Congress, acknowledging that it would be difficult to wrest the district from the popular Rep. Constance A. Morella in the 1998 election.Speaking before about 150 supporters, Neas, a newly registered Democrat, delivered a well-crafted speech in which he made his case for voters in the heavily Democratic district to oust a liberal Republican whom they have re-elected to Congress five times ** by significant margins.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | September 12, 1995
It's all over but the voting.Baltimore voters go to the polls today to choose between Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and City Council President Mary Pat Clarke -- two years and about $2 million in campaign expenses after both announced they would seek the city's highest office.Also at stake in today's Democratic primary are the council presidency and comptroller's office -- as well as 18 councilmanic seats, three in each of six districts.Republicans, meanwhile, have a choice of three little-known candidates for the right to oppose the winner of the Schmoke-Clarke contest in November's general election in the sole contested race on the GOP side.
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