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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Baltimore County officials want to create a regional park on a piece of the Spring Grove Hospital Center campus in Catonsville, property that the University of Maryland, Baltimore County also has been eyeing to expand research facilities. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Thursday he is working with state officials to secure an 8.8-acre parcel that's no longer used by the state psychiatric facility. Spring Grove is a 425-bed hospital providing inpatient psychiatric services for adults and adolescents.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Baltimore County officials want to create a regional park on a piece of the Spring Grove Hospital Center campus in Catonsville, property that the University of Maryland, Baltimore County also has been eyeing to expand research facilities. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Thursday he is working with state officials to secure an 8.8-acre parcel that's no longer used by the state psychiatric facility. Spring Grove is a 425-bed hospital providing inpatient psychiatric services for adults and adolescents.
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NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and By LARRY CARSON,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1999
The mantra of the 1990s has been to operate governments more like businesses, but now some western Howard County residents are saying "enough."Despite years of planning for a $10 million regional park in Glenwood, along Carrs Mill Road and Route 97, some local residents are fighting features that might attract large amounts of people -and raise money for recreation programs that are increasingly financed with participants' fees instead of taxes.More playing fields for soccer and baseball are welcomed and badly needed, critics said.
SPORTS
From Sun news services | September 24, 2012
The Blast of the Major Indoor Soccer League announced Monday that it has partnered with the family of Daniel Borowy to create the "Goals for Daniel" program, a fundraiser for medical costs for the 17-year-old victim of the Perry Hall High shooting last month. Borowy, who underwent three surgeries after the Aug. 24 shooting, recently returned home to continue his recovery. Goals for Daniel will begin Oct. 13 with a soccer marathon at Honeygo Regional Park from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Soccer players, students and members of the Perry Hall community and the surrounding areas will raise money for their participation in six-on-six soccer games.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | December 12, 1991
A proposed regional park on surplus land at Fort Meade is pitting hunters, conservationists and other outdoorsmen against Little League parents and weekend athletes.Both sides packed the O'Malley SeniorCenter in Odenton on Tuesday night as Joe McCann, the county recreation and parks director, pitched his proposal to the Fort Meade Coordinating Council, a citizens advisory group, and Hal O'Connor, directorof the federal Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, which controls thesurplus land.McCann said the county needs a new West County park to meet the growing demand for picnic areas, trails and playing fields created by three large-scale planned communities under construction.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
Along the two-lane roads of western Howard County, lights glimmer from houses sprinkled across former farm fields and the horizon is pink with the glow from nearby cities, but stretches of inky darkness remain. That soon could change in one rural enclave. The county's Department of Recreation and Parks plans to erect lights on five athletic fields, illuminating part of Western Regional Park in Glenwood. The change is being encouraged by some residents who are eager to extend the hours they can use the fields for thriving sports leagues.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
Under clear skies on a chilly day recently, workers scaled scaffolding to pound nails into the frame of a two-story entrance porch at the 19th-century Blandair mansion. The task was among the last before the carpenters ceased their efforts for the winter. But after three years of work during the warm months by National Park Service preservation crews, the exterior of the stately house on a 300-acre estate in Columbia looks vastly different than it did in early 2006. Weathered, worn plywood covered many windows, the deteriorated roof leaked onto rotted support beams and the main entrance was a jury-rigged set of wooden steps in 2006.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF WRITER | August 21, 2003
After more than 19 months of meetings, the Blandair committee has voted to accept a plan to develop the former Smith farm into a regional park in Columbia with playing fields, trails, a nature center and a children's garden. Rather than hash out the details of traffic, lighting and other issues that residents brought up at three public hearings, the 19 members agreed unanimously at its Tuesday meeting to have the consultant address those problems while developing their recommendations into a working plan.
NEWS
December 18, 1998
An article yesterday in the same edition, on the count Recreation and Parks Department's plans to develop the Smith farm into a regional park, incorrectly stated the proposed usage north and south of Route 175. The north area would be designated for "passive" use, and the area south of the roadway would be designated for "active" use.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 12/18/98
NEWS
By Christina Hernandez and Christina Hernandez,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Residents have no excuse to hide out in the air conditioning all summer long. Baltimore County has nearly 200 parks and recreation sites perfect for summer fun. According to the Baltimore County Web site, the Department of Recreation and Parks has an annual budget of more than $12 million. A group of 44 volunteer recreation and park councils raises and spends an additional $13 million for program-related expenses. Robert Barrett, director of Baltimore County Recreation and Parks, said the County Council passed legislation over the past three years as part of a $2.5 million renaissance program to rejuvenate older fields with new irrigation systems, sod and other additions.
EXPLORE
August 22, 2011
A meeting to allow community input on the planned design to close Little Paint Branch Trail's gap between College Park and Fairland Regional Park will be held next month. Hosted by Parks and Recreation staff of the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, the community meeting will be held Wednesday, Sept. 14, from 7-8:30 p.m. at Beltsville Community Center, 3900 Sellman Road. Representatives from M-NCPPC's Park Planning and Development Division will provide an overview of the proposed trail, review the completion schedule and answer questions.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
A private group will be allowed to build a mountain bike training course in Rockburn Park in Elkridge, following a unanimous Wednesday vote by the county's Recreation and Parks Board to go ahead with the contested project. The board had delayed a March vote on the matter after a contentious two-hour hearing in which people opposed to the project said it would bring more traffic, parking problems and loitering, as well as nighttime activity and drug use. Opponents also complained that the project had been rushed through without sufficient notice.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
Think amusement parks are just for kids? Think again. There's nothing like screaming aboard a careening roller coaster, gorging on funnel cake and popcorn, or splashing in a spray of water to bring out your inner child. The advent of spring means parks across the region are now open for business, albeit with abridged, seasonal hours. That gives early birds ample time to catch a sneak preview before the summer crowds descend. Many parks are launching new rides, shows and attractions aimed at all ages.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
Though government revenues are sliding, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman was urged to spend money for everything from education to skateboard parks in his next budget by members of a standing-room-only crowd at his annual hearing. "The fact is, we are in the worst economic crisis that most of us have lived through. We're going to have some tough times," Ulman told the crowd Thursday night. County revenues could drop, depending on state aid and income tax returns, and Ulman said he has asked department heads to prepare two budgets for next fiscal year - one flat and one with a 5 percent reduction.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
Under clear skies on a chilly day recently, workers scaled scaffolding to pound nails into the frame of a two-story entrance porch at the 19th-century Blandair mansion. The task was among the last before the carpenters ceased their efforts for the winter. But after three years of work during the warm months by National Park Service preservation crews, the exterior of the stately house on a 300-acre estate in Columbia looks vastly different than it did in early 2006. Weathered, worn plywood covered many windows, the deteriorated roof leaked onto rotted support beams and the main entrance was a jury-rigged set of wooden steps in 2006.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 14, 2008
Neighbors of two portions of the planned $37 million Blandair Regional Park in Columbia are mounting a revolt against last-minute changes to the southeastern corner of the 300-acre tract. Although supportive of the park, residents who live in neighborhoods near Oakland Mills Road and Old Montgomery Road want a 2-acre skateboard park and the multipurpose building moved away from their homes and toward the center of the 100-acre southern section of the facility. Calling their plan "Alternative G," more than 50 supporters of the idea were among the nearly 200 people who turned out for a county-sponsored public hearing at Oakland Mills High School on Thursday night.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 24, 2002
Baltimore County was awarded $3.8 million yesterday from the state's Program Open Space to complete construction of two regional parks, one in fast-growing Owings Mills and the other in Chase. The funds were approved by the Board of Public Works. "These projects will go a long way toward meeting the growing demand for recreation areas in Baltimore County, while enhancing the green infrastructure that currently exists in the county's natural areas," Gov. Parris N. Glendening said in a statement.
NEWS
By Michael Scarcella and Michael Scarcella,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
For more than a decade, 98 acres of once-prime farmland at the entrance to Green Spring Valley sat empty while a debate raged over whether it should be commercially developed. But all that has changed in the last month. Large earth-moving machines have been kicking up dust and tearing apart the ground at the former Meadowood Farm, creating a regional park - one of four being developed by Baltimore County. Surrounded by lush estates, horse farms, and open farmland, Meadowood Regional Park - at Falls and Greenspring Valley roads - will cost $3.5 million to build, and will serve the recreation councils of Towson, Lutherville/Timonium, Pikesville, and Owings Mills.
NEWS
March 3, 2007
Requests for $8.25 million in state bonds to help pay for Baltimore County projects, including artificial turf fields and walking trails, were forwarded yesterday to the House of Delegates Appropriations Committee, said Del. Eric Bromwell, head of the county's delegation. The 21 senators and delegates who represent the Baltimore County area approved the bond bills during their weekly meeting yesterday, Bromwell said. The most expensive request is $2 million toward the $9.2 million planned Agricultural Resource Center and Farm Park near Oregon Ridge.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | December 15, 2006
The Columbia Association wants more county government money to help dredge Lake Kittamaqundi. Howard Community College wants a $40 million health sciences building. And Howard Transit buses need replacing. Those are some of the requests for County Executive Ken Ulman to consider as he crafts his first budget. No revenue estimates are available for the next fiscal year, which starts July 1, and Ulman's first budget is to be announced in mid-April, when the County Council begins its review.
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