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NEWS
September 13, 2013
We're coming up on the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy next month, just as a new report reveals the biggest culprits for causing global warming and pollution, which scientists warn will bring even more extreme weather in the future ( "The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18). Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center finds power plants are Maryland's single largest source of carbon pollution. Even as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative works to cut carbon pollution and transition Maryland to clean energy, power plants remain the single largest source of carbon pollution in America.
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NEWS
June 2, 2014
Brace yourselves. President Barack Obama is expected to announce today new EPA rules to reduce carbon emissions from the nation's power plants by 20 percent and to force more polluters to participate in cap-and-trade programs. The inflammatory rhetoric from the opposition is likely to reach a Category 5 Event: Massive bloviation. Conservatives, particularly that subset of flat-earthers who are skeptical of anything that smacks of "science," are expected to pounce, first, because it involves addressing climate change, second, may be viewed as anti-coal and, third, involves executive authority, which they detest - at least when it's wielded by a Democrat.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 17, 2014
Maryland and eight other Northeast states are moving to crank down on climate-altering emissions from power plants, aiming to lock in and continue reductions that have already occurred over the past several years as a result of coal-burning plants switching to natural gas, a weak economy and improved energy efficiency. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, in which Maryland is a participant, announced this week it is lowering its overall cap on power plants' carbon-dioxide releases by 45 percent, to 91 million tons.  The multi-state compact also plans to keep reducing the cap by 2.5 percent a year until 2020, by which time it projects emissions to be half what they were in 2005.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 17, 2014
Maryland and eight other Northeast states are moving to crank down on climate-altering emissions from power plants, aiming to lock in and continue reductions that have already occurred over the past several years as a result of coal-burning plants switching to natural gas, a weak economy and improved energy efficiency. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, in which Maryland is a participant, announced this week it is lowering its overall cap on power plants' carbon-dioxide releases by 45 percent, to 91 million tons.  The multi-state compact also plans to keep reducing the cap by 2.5 percent a year until 2020, by which time it projects emissions to be half what they were in 2005.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Maryland and other Northeastern states have helped their economies with "cap-and-trade" regulation of their power plants' carbon dioxide emissions, a new study finds. In the past three years, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative produced a combined economic gain for the 10 participating states of more than $1.6 billion, or about $33 for every person living in the region, according to a report by the economic consulting firm Analysis Group. The ripple effects of making power plants buy permits to release carbon dioxide also created a total of 16,000 jobs, the consultants estimate.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | December 2, 2009
A federal plan to limit carbon-dioxide emissions would cripple small business, subject Americans to "reckless taxes" and increase "wasteful Washington spending," contends House Minority Leader John Boehner. Does he know that a similar scheme already operates in 10 states from Maryland to Maine? Today, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative will auction off its sixth batch of permits in an effort to reduce power-plant CO2 emissions 10 percent by 2018. So far, it's costing Maryland families maybe $1.50 a month, according to Baltimore Gas & Electric.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 9, 2012
Maryland is on track to reduce climate-altering greenhouse gases 25 percent by the end of the decade, according to a state environmental official. In a preview of the state's overdue plan to curb emissions of carbon dioxide and methane, George S. "Tad" Aburn Jr., head of air management for the state Department of the Environment , told members of the House Environmental Matters Committee Wednesday that Maryland should exceed the goal set in a 2009 law if all 65 control programs laid out in the draft blueprint work as planned.
NEWS
December 17, 2009
President Barack Obama got some chuckles this week when he told a crowd at a Home Depot store that "insulation is sexy stuff." But if by that he meant that common energy-efficiency measures are a far more effective (and perhaps even more exciting) way to combat climate change and high energy costs than most people realize, the president got it exactly right. A recent study released by the University of Maryland's Center for Integrative Environmental Research demonstrates just how effective such efforts can be. The report estimates that if Maryland homeowners invested just $3,000 in such mundane improvements as pipe and wall insulation, more efficient furnaces and replacement windows, they'd see a $400-$500 annual reduction in energy costs.
NEWS
December 17, 2009
P resident Barack Obama got some chuckles this week when he told a crowd at a Home Depot store that "insulation is sexy stuff." But if by that he meant that common energy-efficiency measures are a far more effective (and perhaps even more exciting) way to combat climate change and high energy costs than most people realize, the president got it exactly right. A recent study released by the University of Maryland's Center for Integrative Environmental Research demonstrates just how effective such efforts can be. The report estimates that if Maryland homeowners invested just $3,000 in such mundane improvements as pipe and wall insulation, more efficient furnaces and replacement windows, they'd see a $400-$500 annual reduction in energy costs.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
Brace yourselves. President Barack Obama is expected to announce today new EPA rules to reduce carbon emissions from the nation's power plants by 20 percent and to force more polluters to participate in cap-and-trade programs. The inflammatory rhetoric from the opposition is likely to reach a Category 5 Event: Massive bloviation. Conservatives, particularly that subset of flat-earthers who are skeptical of anything that smacks of "science," are expected to pounce, first, because it involves addressing climate change, second, may be viewed as anti-coal and, third, involves executive authority, which they detest - at least when it's wielded by a Democrat.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
We're coming up on the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy next month, just as a new report reveals the biggest culprits for causing global warming and pollution, which scientists warn will bring even more extreme weather in the future ( "The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18). Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center finds power plants are Maryland's single largest source of carbon pollution. Even as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative works to cut carbon pollution and transition Maryland to clean energy, power plants remain the single largest source of carbon pollution in America.
NEWS
By Carol M. Browner | August 18, 2013
During my service as the secretary of Environmental Regulation in Florida and Environmental Protection Agency administrator, I came to appreciate that state action is central to strong environmental protection. Working with the states, the EPA has established and implemented important pollution limits for dangerous toxic emissions including arsenic, mercury and lead. It only makes sense to do the same for carbon pollution, just as Gov. Martin O'Malley recently proposed. Maryland has spent decades trying to reverse the impacts of the dangerous pollution of our air and water by fighting fiercely to protect the Chesapeake Bay and the important economic benefits it provides to the state and the region.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 11, 2012
A pioneering regional compact to fight climate change stands at a crossroads, as officials from Maryland and eight other Northeast states meet Tuesday in New York to weigh new limits on their power plants' carbon dioxide emissions. With emissions significantly reduced since the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative began in 2008 - though mainly from other factors - the states are weighing how much lower to try to push carbon-dioxide releases through the end of the decade without risking stifling their economic recovery.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 9, 2012
Maryland is on track to reduce climate-altering greenhouse gases 25 percent by the end of the decade, according to a state environmental official. In a preview of the state's overdue plan to curb emissions of carbon dioxide and methane, George S. "Tad" Aburn Jr., head of air management for the state Department of the Environment , told members of the House Environmental Matters Committee Wednesday that Maryland should exceed the goal set in a 2009 law if all 65 control programs laid out in the draft blueprint work as planned.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | January 10, 2012
State officials have missed their first major deadline for complying with a three-year-old law calling for Maryland to curb its emissions of climate-altering greenhouse gases. Under the 2009 Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act, the Department of the Environment was required to give the governor and lawmakers a draft plan by the end of 2011 for scaling back statewide releases of carbon dioxide, methane and other climate-affecting gases 25 percent by the end of the decade. But Environment Secretary Robert M. Summers wrote Gov. Martin O'Malley and legislative leaders late last month that the draft plan would be "slightly delayed" until mid-February.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Maryland and other Northeastern states have helped their economies with "cap-and-trade" regulation of their power plants' carbon dioxide emissions, a new study finds. In the past three years, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative produced a combined economic gain for the 10 participating states of more than $1.6 billion, or about $33 for every person living in the region, according to a report by the economic consulting firm Analysis Group. The ripple effects of making power plants buy permits to release carbon dioxide also created a total of 16,000 jobs, the consultants estimate.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | January 10, 2012
State officials have missed their first major deadline for complying with a three-year-old law calling for Maryland to curb its emissions of climate-altering greenhouse gases. Under the 2009 Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act, the Department of the Environment was required to give the governor and lawmakers a draft plan by the end of 2011 for scaling back statewide releases of carbon dioxide, methane and other climate-affecting gases 25 percent by the end of the decade. But Environment Secretary Robert M. Summers wrote Gov. Martin O'Malley and legislative leaders late last month that the draft plan would be "slightly delayed" until mid-February.
NEWS
November 15, 2011
A burden on the working class. A jobs killer. A hidden tax on every purchase. That's' just some of the strong invective hurled at the concept of cap-and-trade programs by its politically conservative critics in recent years. But a funny thing has happened to those 10 states, including Maryland, that actually signed onto what's known as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) and started requiring power plant owners to purchase allowances for each ton of carbon dioxide they emit.
NEWS
By Richard Haddad | October 25, 2011
It seems that the man-made global warming scare, long promoted by those opposed to the burning of fossil fuel, is now behind us. It turns out that there is no unanimity of scientists supporting man-made global warming theory and never has been. It's also now becoming widely recognized that there is no incontrovertible evidence that global warming is caused by human activity, and that there is quite a bit of evidence that human activity is not a primary cause of such warming. It's becoming better known that for at least 240,000 years, a rise in CO2 has followed rather than preceded global warming.
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