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Regional Bells

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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 30, 1994
What a difference a decade makes.When American Telephone & Telegraph was broken up, each day I'd respond to dozens of shareholders who'd buttonhole me to ask which of the regional Bells to keep and which to sell.I'd point out the individual nature of each of the seven regionals, such as the size of its particular customer base. Then I'd add that a conservative investor would do fine no matter which ones he kept.Fortunately, that's just how it turned out. But while baby Bells were created equal, their individual strategies today are unique.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 2004
SBC Communications Inc., as part of its effort to compete head-on with the cable industry for television subscribers, plans to announce today that it will pay $400 million to Microsoft Corp. for software used to deliver TV programming over high-speed data lines. It would be a crucial move into unproven territory for SBC, which, like the other regional telephone giants, wants to grow by expanding beyond phone and Internet services and into entertainment. To do that, SBC expects to spend more than $4 billion over the next three years on its fiber-optic network in order to offer faster Internet connections capable of carrying digital video programming.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department is close to recommending that a regional Bell telephone company be allowed to enter the long-distance industry for the first time since the government forced the breakup of the Bell System more than a decade ago.People familiar with the proposal, which would require the approval of a federal judge, say it would allow Ameritech Corp. to offer long-distance service to customers in metropolitan Chicago.In return, the company would be required to open its local-telephone business in the area to full competition by other telecommunications companies.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2003
Verizon Communications Inc., the nation's largest local phone company, will launch long-distance service today in Maryland and Washington, in what some believe will spur competition by giving consumers more choices - as well as a slew of advertisements. It is the final piece of the puzzle that Verizon needed to bundle its services, said Maura Breen, a senior vice president and chief marketing officer for Verizon. "It's something that we've waited for and worked very hard for," she said.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1997
The plans of long-distance telephone companies to get into local telephone markets were dealt a major blow yesterday as the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis threw out regulations that were intended to foster competition with the local telephone incumbents.The ruling stemmed from the court's decision in July to strike down key elements of the Federal Communications Commission's rules for opening up local telephone markets.It was a further setback to the commission's agenda for increasing competition just as its chairman, Reed Hundt, prepares to step down.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2002
Marylanders haven't made a long-distance phone call on Verizon Communications Inc., or its predecessor, since the nationwide breakup of the Bell monopoly in 1984, but that may change soon. The company filed with state regulators yesterday to add long-distance service to its local phone business - an action that could have a profound impact on the state's turbulent telecommunications industry. If Verizon wins approval from state and federal officials, it could likely begin offering long-distance service next year.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | December 26, 1993
When the Bell telephone monopoly bbroke up 10 years ago this week, Frederick D. D'Alessio thought he was in the wrong place at the wrong time.Had the breakup occurred six months earlier, the mid-level manager with New Jersey Bell would have gone with the parent AT&T in the split. But because he was working in one of Ma Bell's regional affiliates when the music stopped, all he could do was grab a seat at this new regional phone company called Bell Atlantic Corp."There was this view that AT&T was the place to be and that it was going to be the shooting star," Mr. D'Alessio says.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The two heavyweight contenders in the struggle for control of the nation's information infrastructure slugged it out in front of a House Judiciary subcommittee yesterday, each trying to put its stamp on legislation that would rewrite the nation's basic telecommunications law.After a hearing that one wag compared to a meeting of divorcing spouses over custody of the family dog, it was the Baby Bells who appeared to outpoint the long-distance telephone...
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1996
Quickly seizing upon the freedoms it won in a new telecommunications law, Bell Atlantic Corp. announced yesterday that it has taken the first formal step toward realizing its long-frustrated ambition of becoming a nationwide long-distance carrier.The Philadelphia-based telecommunications company said it has filed applications to provide long-distance service in five states outside its core region -- North Carolina, Florida, Illinois, South Carolina and Texas. Under the law signed by Congress Feb. 8, those regulatory approvals are likely.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
As Hurricane Felix threatened Bell Atlantic Corp.'s territory with 80-mph winds yesterday, the union that represents the crews that repair damaged telephone lines continued to teeter on the brink of a strike.A spokesman for the Communications Workers of America, which represents 37,000 Bell Atlantic network maintenance workers and other employees from New Jersey to Virginia, said yesterday that the union has rejected the company's latest offer to replace the contract that expired 12 days ago.Doug Thompson, a spokesman for CWA District 2, said the union would not alter its bargaining strategy because of the storm -- either to avoid it or take advantage of it."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
The fragile balance of power in the telecommunications industry may have tilted a bit more toward the powerful regional Bell phone companies after Tuesday's national elections. Legislation that would help local phone giants such as Verizon Communications Corp. gain in areas such as broadband Internet service has been blocked by the Democratic-led Senate. And the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Michael K. Powell, has been restrained from pushing an aggressive deregulatory agenda that might favor the Bells because of the party split in Congress.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2002
Marylanders haven't made a long-distance phone call on Verizon Communications Inc., or its predecessor, since the nationwide breakup of the Bell monopoly in 1984, but that may change soon. The company filed with state regulators yesterday to add long-distance service to its local phone business - an action that could have a profound impact on the state's turbulent telecommunications industry. If Verizon wins approval from state and federal officials, it could likely begin offering long-distance service next year.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
If one big change in telecommunications does come to Maryland in 2002, Darth Vader will likely let you know. His voice anyway. Verizon Corp. plans to file with the Maryland Public Service Commission this spring to win permission to offer long-distance phone service in the state. It has already won the right to do so in New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania and awaits federal approval for Rhode Island and New Jersey. If it wins approval in Maryland, the company will launch a heavy marketing campaign with its pitchman, the deep-voiced actor James Earl Jones.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2001
The telephone industry once was contained in two words: Ma Bell. It's much more complicated now. Today, hundreds of companies compete to provide phone service in the United States, although they have been going out of business this year at the rate of almost one a week. Four large companies that spun off from the former Bell System, including Verizon Communications Inc., control about 90 percent of the $700 billion industry. Hundreds of other companies known as Competitive Local Exchange Companies, or CLECs, split the remaining 10 percent.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
For the first time since the 1984 breakup of AT&T, one of the regional Bell telephone companies has won permission to offer long-distance service in its territory, a long-anticipated development that could be repeated in Maryland next year.The Federal Communications Commission said yesterday that its five commissioners had voted unanimously to allow Bell Atlantic Corp. to sell long-distance service in New York state.Bell Atlantic's New York application is seen as a bellwether for the company's entry into the long-distance markets of the other 12 states it serves, including Maryland.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 1999
Bell Atlantic today will become the first of the regional Bell companies allowed into the $80 billion long-distance market, signaling an era of competition in the communications industry, people close to the decision said yesterday.The announcement, expected from the Federal Communications Commission, would allow Bell Atlantic to sell long-distance services to 6.6 million households it serves in New York state.Approval would mark the first time since the breakup of AT&T Corp.'s Bell System 15 years ago that millions of consumers would be able to get both local and long-distance phone services from an offspring of Ma Bell.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1995
Bell Atlantic Corp. and Nynex Corp. remained coy about reports yesterday that they are holding merger talks, but telephone industry analysts said that if a massive federal telecommunications bill becomes law, such a combination is all but inevitable.The Wall Street Journal, citing unidentified executives, reported that officials of the two companies were meeting to explore plans for such a merger, including the tricky question of who would run a combined company. The newspaper said no final decision has been made on a merger, and there were no signs that an agreement was imminent.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1996
The Communications Workers of America claimed an "absolute victory" yesterday as the union disclosed details of a -- hard-won agreement with Bell Atlantic Corp. on all but local issues.But, although the company apparently backed down on some critical concessions it desperately wanted, it apparently got the one it said it needed most.The tentative agreement on "common issues" came 5 1/2 months after the expiration of a contract covering about 34,400 CWA members in Bell Atlantic's region, including about 8,000 in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to put on a fast track for final action the growing dispute over how to restructure the nation's telephone business to spur competition to provide local service.The justices issued a brief order saying they will take up later this month the controversy revolving around the $100 billion local market. A decision could come by early summer.The court has before it six separate appeals -- from long-distance companies, the Federal Communications Commission and local companies.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1997
The plans of long-distance telephone companies to get into local telephone markets were dealt a major blow yesterday as the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis threw out regulations that were intended to foster competition with the local telephone incumbents.The ruling stemmed from the court's decision in July to strike down key elements of the Federal Communications Commission's rules for opening up local telephone markets.It was a further setback to the commission's agenda for increasing competition just as its chairman, Reed Hundt, prepares to step down.
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