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From Sun staff reports | September 15, 2012
Tailback Donnie Neal made school history last week by rushing for six touchdowns in Reginald Lewis' 48-0 win over Ben Franklin-Masonville Cove. The Falcons were at it again Friday when they beat host Forest Park, 48-8, for the first time in Baltimore City Division II football action. Neal had 125 yards on 13 carries and two touchdowns. Quarterback Tayvon Queen was 8-for-9 passing for 147 yards and a touchdown along with two rushing touchdowns, one a 47-yard scamper in the second quarter.
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NEWS
By Betsey Swingle Hobelmann, Kimberly R. Moffitt and Jack J. Pannell Jr | May 2, 2014
Some of the most esteemed Baltimoreans attended or graduated from Baltimore City high schools: Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and U.S. Congressman Parren Mitchell (Douglass), Wall Street financier Reginald Lewis (Dunbar), and writer Ta-Nehisi Coates (Poly). These revered men remind us of a yesteryear when black males, in particular, had opportunities to thrive and succeed while attending city schools. But that Baltimore of old is very different from the one many black males experience today.
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NEWS
November 17, 2005
On November 12, 2005, REGINALD LEWIS LINDSAY, loving father of Tamara Harris, Dionne Lindsay-Tillman, and Troy Spriggs. Cherished grandfather (Pop Pop) of Tamika, Jordan, Raven, Troy Jr., Lindsay, Timothy Jr., Tyon and the late Brijae Harris, great grandfather of Breyonna, Juwan and Brittney. Devoted brother of Wardell Lindsay. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Wednesday 12 noon to 8 P.M. The family will receive friends at the Fellowship Christian Community Church, 5202 Park Heights Avenue, Thursday 10:30 A.M. Funeral service will begin 11 A.M. Interment Arbutus Memorial Park.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
I was stricken by your recent review of the current show at the Lewis Museum ("'Ashe to Amen' exhibit at Reginald Lewis museum raises questions," June 29). Your focus seemed ill-advised and neglected the strengths of the show that curator Leslie King-Hammond has assembled. I saw the exhibition with a group of very intelligent, art savvy women who were enchanted by it. Let's be reminded that the show originated in New York at the American Bible Museum, where I first saw it. Some of your criticism of conflict of interest would not apply to this venue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
If there's one work that economically and poetically encapsulates the theme of the new exhibit "Ashe to Amen," it's a black-and-white photograph of a well-thumbed Bible, flipped open and lying atop an African drum. The 1989 gelatin print by Chester Higgins Jr., part of the exhibit on display through Sept. 29 at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, explores in one deceptively simple shot how African culture clashes and commingles with Christian traditions.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
Reginald F. Lewis said he didn't like to be called an African-American success story, because such a description was a label that drew a limited picture of the person.But that description was an integral part of the story of the Baltimore native -- a lawyer, financier and philanthropist who headed the billion-dollar TLC Beatrice International Holdings, the nation's largest black-owned business.Mr. Lewis, 50, a onetime star athlete at Dunbar High School, died yesterday in a New York City hospital.
NEWS
January 22, 1993
Reginald Lewis, the Baltimore native and former Dunbar High School quarterback who died Tuesday of brain cancer at age 50, was a lawyer, entrepreneur, self-made millionaire and philanthropist. His acquisition of the Beatrice Company's international food operations in 1987 helped make him one of America's richest men, with a personal fortune estimated at $400 million. He owned homes in New York City and Paris, a private jet and an extensive art collection.He was also a African American male and head of the largest black-owned business in America -- even as he insisted that race was irrelevant and resisted being cast as a role model for others.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 11, 2012
BALTIMORE - Midway through the fourth quarter of Saturday's Class 1A North Region playoff game, Manchester Valley's football squad came to the crossroads. A swarming Reginald Lewis defense and a couple of penalties had forced the Mavericks into a fourth down and 24 yards-to-go situation. No problem. Senior quarterback Dom Frank calmly dropped back and found wide receiver Zach Heron down the left sideline, just a step ahead of the Lewis defense. Frank threw a pinpoint pass that was hauled in by Heron for a 33-yard gain and a crucial first down.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
When she was 12 years old, Christina Lewis Halpern was caught in the collision between great good fortune and terrible luck. And the suddenness and severity of the impact jolted her deeply, though it would take years for her to experience the full effects. And yet, after the pioneering African-American businessman Reginald F. Lewis died of a brain tumor on Jan. 19, 1993, just seven weeks after the disease was diagnosed, his youngest daughter took pains to conceal her shock. She didn't cry. Instead, she reacted by becoming responsible and very quiet.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | December 18, 1994
It's hard to say exactly when the Reginald Lewis emerged who ultimately would become the head of a billion-dollar business empire.It may have been when he was a boy on the streets of Baltimore, hawking the Afro-American and News American newspapers.It may have been during his teen-age years, when he took odd jobs as a waiter and promised a friend that he would one day be the richest black man in America.It may have been when he quarterbacked Dunbar High School's football team and led it to an upset victory over a Baltimore Polytechnic Institute team in his first varsity start as a sophomore.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Your review of the "Ashe to Amen" exhibition at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African-American History and Culture did a disservice to readers ("'Ashe to Amen' exhibit at Reginald Lewis museum raises questions," June 29). Instead of sharing the incredible content of the show, the reviewer chose to concentrate on what she perceived to be the ethical issues raised by the curator's decision to include one of her own artworks in the show. That topic was worth at most only a paragraph or two to anyone outside the art world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
If there's one work that economically and poetically encapsulates the theme of the new exhibit "Ashe to Amen," it's a black-and-white photograph of a well-thumbed Bible, flipped open and lying atop an African drum. The 1989 gelatin print by Chester Higgins Jr., part of the exhibit on display through Sept. 29 at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, explores in one deceptively simple shot how African culture clashes and commingles with Christian traditions.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 17, 2012
It was a split decision for Carroll's two remaining teams on Friday night in the state high school football playoffs. The top-seeded Westminster High School Owls rode the arm and legs of quarterback Deryk Kern to a resounding 62-28 win over second seed Sherwood High in the Class 4A North Region championship game at Ruby Field.  Yet after defeating Reginald Lewis in the first playoff game in school history last Saturday, Manchester Valley closed...
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | November 11, 2012
The football season is winding down for most local teams, as only 19 remain in action with just three weeks left until the season culminates in the state championships at M&T Bank Stadium. Although most games this weekend went as expected, a handful of upsets peppered the regional playoffs, none bigger than Meade upending previously-unbeaten Arundel. As the MIAA heads into its championship weekend and the public schools head into regional finals, here are some of the statstics that stood out in this weekend's action.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 11, 2012
BALTIMORE - Midway through the fourth quarter of Saturday's Class 1A North Region playoff game, Manchester Valley's football squad came to the crossroads. A swarming Reginald Lewis defense and a couple of penalties had forced the Mavericks into a fourth down and 24 yards-to-go situation. No problem. Senior quarterback Dom Frank calmly dropped back and found wide receiver Zach Heron down the left sideline, just a step ahead of the Lewis defense. Frank threw a pinpoint pass that was hauled in by Heron for a 33-yard gain and a crucial first down.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
Trailing Reginald F. Lewis by a point late in Saturday's Class 1A North regional football playoffs, Manchester Valley coach Tony Shermeyer decided to take a big risk -- and the gamble paid off. On fourth-and-24 from their own 46-yard line, the Mavericks went for it and quarterback Dominick Frank, who had just run for 17 yards on third-and-41, completed a 33-yard pass to Zach Heron. Helped along by two Falcons penalties, the Mavericks scored three plays later on a 6-yard run. Kyle Armstrong's extra point gave Manchester Valley a 20-14 lead with 2:46 left that would hold up for the first football playoff win in school history.
FEATURES
By MARY COREY and MARY COREY,Mary Corey is a features writer for The Sun | April 14, 1991
Notes from a staff meeting:Reginald F. Lewis dashes into the boardroom, throwing off his jacket and grabbing a puff of his Cuban cigar. He allows a moment for pleasantries -- a simple apology for keeping his assistants waiting. Six men have been sitting around this table anxiously, their calculators, yellow legal pads and expensive fountain pens poised to tally the figures and record the thoughts of their leader.Mr. Lewis doesn't disappoint. The chairman and chief executive officer of TLC Beatrice International Holdings, a multinational food company, dives in.He skips continents the way other people switch TV channels.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
After Edmondson safety Laqwan Moody picked off a Douglass pass with 21 seconds to go to seal Saturday's 14-10 playoff victory for the Red Storm, he didn't want to say much about the win other than that it was "unfinished business. " For the No. 12 Red Storm, which reached the state semifinals last season, a state title to match the program's first crown in 2006 is the ultimate goal and they took a big step in that direction at Poly. They will host Dundalk in the Class 2A North region final next weekend after beating one of their toughest Baltimore City opponents for the second time this fall.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | November 8, 2012
In 2008, Tony Shermeyer was The Baltimore Sun's Football Coach of the Year after leading Century to the state semifinals in only his fourth season as head coach. The Knights also had their first winning season, 12-1, that fall. After that, Shermeyer left the Knights to start the program further north in Carroll County when Manchester Valley opened. Now in his fourth season with the Mavericks, he has guided them to their first berth in the regional playoffs and their first winning season.
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