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Reginald Denny

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By CARL T. ROWAN | October 22, 1993
Washington. -- Sometimes one man of forgiveness, compassion and uncommon wisdom can bring more tranquility to a city or nation than a thousand policemen, or ten thousand National Guardsmen.Occasionally, one victim of a horrible crime who chooses righteousness over revenge can redeem an entire criminal-justice system and pull millions of people out of a long, dark night of hatred and fear.Such a man is Reginald O. Denny, the white truck driver we saw on television in April 1992 as he was beaten mercilessly by young Los Angeles blacks.
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NEWS
July 12, 2009
On July 6, 2009, Reginald Dennis Lee, Sr Friends may call at THE CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Monday 1 to 8 P.M. The family will receive friends at the above chapel Tuesday 11 A.M. Funeral services will begin 11:30 A.M. Interment King Memorial Park.
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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 8, 1992
I called Reginald Denny yesterday, and while he was not giving interviews, the hospital spokesman said Denny had regained the power of speech.Nobody had known for sure if he ever would talk again. Nobody had known for sure if he ever would walk again."But he took a few steps for the first time," the spokesman said. "And that's very good news."Indeed it is. Reginald Denny is the white truck driver who was pulled from the cab of his cement truck and beaten during the recent rioting in Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- On a spring day in 1993, Anna Deavere Smith's search for American character took her to a lawyer's office in Los Angeles where she spoke to Reginald Denny, a white trucker beaten unconscious a year before in uprisings following the Rodney King police brutality trial. As usual, she switched on her tape recorder, asked questions, listened. It's remarkable, she says, how it's possible to discover something profound about someone in a short time.In this case, it happened near the end of the hour-long interview, when Smith asked Denny: "What do you want?"
NEWS
October 21, 1993
Some residents of Los Angeles say the jury let Damien Williams and Henry Watson off easy for beating Reginald Denny in the riotous aftermath of the acquittals of the police officers who beat Rodney King. Inevitably, there have been calls for a second trial in federal court. There would be some symmetry in a federal trial:* The police officers who beat Mr. King were acquitted by suburban jurors, though videotape evidence clearly showed officers went beyond the legal limit in using force to subdue him. Messrs.
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | September 10, 1993
"Where,'' Reginald Denny might be asking himself, ''is my invitation to join the NAACP?''If he is, it's a darned good question, one that NAACP executive director Ben Chavis might consider answering by extending the same invitation to Reginald Denny to join the NAACP that Chavis extended to Rodney King.Mr. Denny, for those of you who've just beamed in from a distant planet, is the unfortunate white truck driver who had the misfortune to be at the corner of Florence and Normandie avenues on April 29, 1992, the day the Los Angeles riots began.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 5, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Reginald Denny, the truck driver who was beaten severely in the first moments of the unrest in the city's South Central area, was able to talk yesterday for the first time since the incident, and doctors upgraded his condition to good.Doctors at Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital in Inglewood, where Mr. Denny was taken by a group of onlookers after the beating Wednesday night, said his prognosis was improving. They said they still had not determined whether Mr. Denny had suffered permanent brain injuries.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | September 27, 1993
ACROSS the chasm created by two trials, black America and white America try to communicate.The trials are famous because of their victims, not their defendants.The first Rodney King trial ended in acquittal of the four police officers accused of using excessive force and triggered the worst rioting of this century. The second Rodney King trial -- in which the four officers were prosecuted for violating Rodney King's civil rights -- ended in a guilty verdict for two of them. But when they were sentenced to only 2 1/2 years in prison, black America fumed that a dual standard of justice prevailed in the land.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 31, 1993
Washington. -- Watching the drama of the Reginald Denny beating trial unfold on cable television, I was pleasantly surprised.I was not surprised at the horror. I expected the bloody scenes of Mr. Denny's beating during the Los Angeles riots, captured by a minicam on a hovering news helicopter at the now-infamous corner of Florence and Normandie avenues, to be brutal as ever, and they were.But, after his testimony, in which he was unable to recall who his assailants were, I didn't expect to see Mr. Denny walk over to the mothers of Damian Monroe Williams, 20, and Henry Keith Watson, 28, shake hands with them and give them each a hug.Messrs.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- On a spring day in 1993, Anna Deavere Smith's search for American character took her to a lawyer's office in Los Angeles where she spoke to Reginald Denny, a white trucker beaten unconscious a year before in uprisings following the Rodney King police brutality trial. As usual, she switched on her tape recorder, asked questions, listened. It's remarkable, she says, how it's possible to discover something profound about someone in a short time.In this case, it happened near the end of the hour-long interview, when Smith asked Denny: "What do you want?"
NEWS
November 24, 1993
Using Race to Avoid ResponsibilityI accepted the challenge of reading and translating Samuel L. Banks' Nov. 5 letter relating to your editorial, "After the Verdicts, Time for Healing."Dr. Banks is like so many African-Americans who seek to justify the asocial and anarchistic behavior of African-Americans whose motivation for their actions is rooted in their general disrespect // for laws governing a civilized society.People like Dr. Banks are myopic, concentrating on the skin complexion of the perpetrators or alleged perpetrators of lawlessness rather than focusing on the action or issue with which the alleged criminal is associated.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | October 22, 1993
Washington. -- Sometimes one man of forgiveness, compassion and uncommon wisdom can bring more tranquility to a city or nation than a thousand policemen, or ten thousand National Guardsmen.Occasionally, one victim of a horrible crime who chooses righteousness over revenge can redeem an entire criminal-justice system and pull millions of people out of a long, dark night of hatred and fear.Such a man is Reginald O. Denny, the white truck driver we saw on television in April 1992 as he was beaten mercilessly by young Los Angeles blacks.
NEWS
October 21, 1993
Some residents of Los Angeles say the jury let Damien Williams and Henry Watson off easy for beating Reginald Denny in the riotous aftermath of the acquittals of the police officers who beat Rodney King. Inevitably, there have been calls for a second trial in federal court. There would be some symmetry in a federal trial:* The police officers who beat Mr. King were acquitted by suburban jurors, though videotape evidence clearly showed officers went beyond the legal limit in using force to subdue him. Messrs.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | September 27, 1993
ACROSS the chasm created by two trials, black America and white America try to communicate.The trials are famous because of their victims, not their defendants.The first Rodney King trial ended in acquittal of the four police officers accused of using excessive force and triggered the worst rioting of this century. The second Rodney King trial -- in which the four officers were prosecuted for violating Rodney King's civil rights -- ended in a guilty verdict for two of them. But when they were sentenced to only 2 1/2 years in prison, black America fumed that a dual standard of justice prevailed in the land.
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | September 10, 1993
"Where,'' Reginald Denny might be asking himself, ''is my invitation to join the NAACP?''If he is, it's a darned good question, one that NAACP executive director Ben Chavis might consider answering by extending the same invitation to Reginald Denny to join the NAACP that Chavis extended to Rodney King.Mr. Denny, for those of you who've just beamed in from a distant planet, is the unfortunate white truck driver who had the misfortune to be at the corner of Florence and Normandie avenues on April 29, 1992, the day the Los Angeles riots began.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 31, 1993
Washington. -- Watching the drama of the Reginald Denny beating trial unfold on cable television, I was pleasantly surprised.I was not surprised at the horror. I expected the bloody scenes of Mr. Denny's beating during the Los Angeles riots, captured by a minicam on a hovering news helicopter at the now-infamous corner of Florence and Normandie avenues, to be brutal as ever, and they were.But, after his testimony, in which he was unable to recall who his assailants were, I didn't expect to see Mr. Denny walk over to the mothers of Damian Monroe Williams, 20, and Henry Keith Watson, 28, shake hands with them and give them each a hug.Messrs.
NEWS
November 24, 1993
Using Race to Avoid ResponsibilityI accepted the challenge of reading and translating Samuel L. Banks' Nov. 5 letter relating to your editorial, "After the Verdicts, Time for Healing."Dr. Banks is like so many African-Americans who seek to justify the asocial and anarchistic behavior of African-Americans whose motivation for their actions is rooted in their general disrespect // for laws governing a civilized society.People like Dr. Banks are myopic, concentrating on the skin complexion of the perpetrators or alleged perpetrators of lawlessness rather than focusing on the action or issue with which the alleged criminal is associated.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | April 16, 1993
Washington. -- As a jury has deliberated the fate of four white Los Angeles policemen accused of brutally violating the civil rights of black motorist Rodney King, we have been afforded glimpses into the worst and best of American thought, behavior and journalism.We have the appalling scene of scores of Los Angeles people standing in line to buy guns -- a hysterical reversion to Wild West vigilantism that invites myriad tragedies in a city already awash in deadly firearms.In a community not half recovered from earlier riots that took at least 52 lives and destroyed a billion dollars of property, we have seen a media drumbeat of rumors and speculations about even ghastlier new riots if the new jury verdict offends leaders of Los Angeles street gangs -- and public-opinion makers.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder Newspapers | August 26, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- He had just watched the lengthy videotape of his brutal beating at the flash point of last year's riots, then described his injuries in calm tones but excruciating detail: a shattered jaw, collapsed eye socket and permanent softball-sized soft spot on his head.But as truck driver Reginald Denny left the courtroom yesterday after the first part of his testimony in the trial of two men charged in his beating, he walked over to their mothers and hugged them.The third day of testimony in the trial of Damian Monroe Williams, 20, and Henry Keith Watson, 28, was loaded with drama.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | April 16, 1993
Washington. -- As a jury has deliberated the fate of four white Los Angeles policemen accused of brutally violating the civil rights of black motorist Rodney King, we have been afforded glimpses into the worst and best of American thought, behavior and journalism.We have the appalling scene of scores of Los Angeles people standing in line to buy guns -- a hysterical reversion to Wild West vigilantism that invites myriad tragedies in a city already awash in deadly firearms.In a community not half recovered from earlier riots that took at least 52 lives and destroyed a billion dollars of property, we have seen a media drumbeat of rumors and speculations about even ghastlier new riots if the new jury verdict offends leaders of Los Angeles street gangs -- and public-opinion makers.
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