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Regina Taylor

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NEWS
March 7, 2005
On March 4, 2005, MELVIN CHARLES TAYLOR, SR.; beloved husband of the late Lillian Regina Taylor (nee Trautman); devoted father of Melvin C. Taylor, Jr. and his wife Mary and William B. Taylor and his wife Sherre; cherished grandfather of Brian Taylor and his wife Christine, Lisa Shaprow and her husband Ted, Nicole Mc Donald and her husband John and Trisha Taylor; great-grandfather of Anna and Caroline Taylor and Kelcy Shaprow. Relatives and friends are invited to call at Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., of Bel Air, 610 W. Mac Phail Road (Rt. 24)
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NEWS
March 7, 2005
On March 4, 2005, MELVIN CHARLES TAYLOR, SR.; beloved husband of the late Lillian Regina Taylor (nee Trautman); devoted father of Melvin C. Taylor, Jr. and his wife Mary and William B. Taylor and his wife Sherre; cherished grandfather of Brian Taylor and his wife Christine, Lisa Shaprow and her husband Ted, Nicole Mc Donald and her husband John and Trisha Taylor; great-grandfather of Anna and Caroline Taylor and Kelcy Shaprow. Relatives and friends are invited to call at Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., of Bel Air, 610 W. Mac Phail Road (Rt. 24)
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 8, 1993
It's a Monday with nothing really special on tap, but with weekly series doing their best to provide something that may get attention -- like, say, Hugh Hefner on two NBC sitcoms, or Mike Wallace and Orrin Hatch on one CBS sitcom.* "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" (8-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Hilary (Karyn Parsons) takes Will (Will Smith) to a party -- at the Playboy Mansion, where Hugh Hefner is in attendance. NBC.* "I'll Fly Away" (8-9 p.m., WETA, Channel 26) -- The primary characters on this fine series adjust their allegiances a bit tonight, as Forrest (Sam Waterston)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 29, 1995
Almost nothing is black and white when it comes to blacks and television. What looks to be a step forward often turns out to be two or more steps back.Just as "The Cosby Show" was being hailed as one of the most progressive sitcoms ever, along came a study that found many white viewers used the upper-middle-class status of the Huxtable family as proof that black Americans no longer faced any barriers in the real world.L In other words, the series helped them justify their racism.And just as we were about to applaud network television for creating a realistic, working-class comedy about blacks after decades of eye-rolling stereotypes like "Good Times," Fox cancels "Roc."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 18, 1993
There's no baseball tonight. For those looking elsewhere for entertainment, the place to turn is PBS, which cements its claim to the "quality" TV audience as it begins to roll out weekly episodes of "I'll Fly Away."* "I'll Fly Away" (8-9:45 p.m., WMPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Last week PBS showed its brand-new made-for-TV movie of "I'll Fly Away." Tonight it shows another episode -- this one the original series pilot, which explains how Lilly Harper (Regina Taylor) came to work for Forrest Bedford (Sam Waterston)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 29, 1995
Almost nothing is black and white when it comes to blacks and television. What looks to be a step forward often turns out to be two or more steps back.Just as "The Cosby Show" was being hailed as one of the most progressive sitcoms ever, along came a study that found many white viewers used the upper-middle-class status of the Huxtable family as proof that black Americans no longer faced any barriers in the real world.L In other words, the series helped them justify their racism.And just as we were about to applaud network television for creating a realistic, working-class comedy about blacks after decades of eye-rolling stereotypes like "Good Times," Fox cancels "Roc."
FEATURES
By Susan Stewart and Susan Stewart,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 25, 1992
Can TV be too good for its own good? If most of prime-time TV -- laugh tracks, moving moments, lessons learned -- is life made simple, then NBC's "I'll Fly Away" is TV made difficult. Is it too difficult? Or have we all watched so much "good TV" that we can't recognize something great when it comes along?"Away," which returns Friday (9 p.m. on Channel 2) for nine weeks of new episodes, is not always easy to take. It offers few answers. It creeps along toward uncertain conclusions, its 1950s Southern setting unenhanced by stock characters or fake antebellum atmosphere.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 7, 1995
Los Angeles -- Finally, after two years of insisting that it was right and everybody else was wrong about demographics, the brass at CBS admitted yesterday that its prime-time audience is way too old."We have to re-invent ourselves," said Peter Tortorici, president of CBS Entertainment. "CBS has got to achieve a greater level of balance in demographics. We don't have enough programming on our schedule that goes after the younger adult audience."Mr. Tortorici defined the new target audience for CBS as those viewers between the ages of 25 and 54, which gives you some idea of how old most viewers of the network are."
NEWS
May 15, 2004
On Saturday, May 8, 2004, JOHN W., devoted father of Michelle Johnson; beloved brother of Linwood Joseph Jackson, Roosevelt Jackson, Nellie Jackson, Harvinia Ellis, Alease Jackson, and Regina Taylor. He is also survived by a grandson, Reno. He was predeceased by Arthur Jackson, a brother, March 2001. Friends may call at the Nutter Funeral Home, Inc., 2501 Gwynns Falls Parkway, on Sunday, 12 to 5 P.M. Family will receive friends at the Mt. Olive Baptist Church on York Road and Bosley Avenue, Monday, May 17, at 10:30 to 11 A.M. with funeral services to follow.
NEWS
January 28, 2009
On January 25, 2009, FRANCISCO ELLSWORTH TAYLOR, SR.; devoted and beloved father of Theresa Smith, Monica Allen, Carmelita Jenkins, Regina Taylor-White, Francisco E., Jr. and Vincent Taylor. He is also survived by a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation at THE DERRICK C. JONES FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 4611 Park Heights Avenue on Wednesday January 28, 2 to 7 P.M. Mr Taylor will lie instate at St. Gregory the Great Roman Catholic Church, 1542 N. Gilmor Street on Thursday January 29 at 9 A.M. Family will receive friends at 10 A.M. with funeral service to follow at 11 A.M. Interment in New Cathedral Cemetery.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 7, 1995
Los Angeles -- Finally, after two years of insisting that it was right and everybody else was wrong about demographics, the brass at CBS admitted yesterday that its prime-time audience is way too old."We have to re-invent ourselves," said Peter Tortorici, president of CBS Entertainment. "CBS has got to achieve a greater level of balance in demographics. We don't have enough programming on our schedule that goes after the younger adult audience."Mr. Tortorici defined the new target audience for CBS as those viewers between the ages of 25 and 54, which gives you some idea of how old most viewers of the network are."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 8, 1993
It's a Monday with nothing really special on tap, but with weekly series doing their best to provide something that may get attention -- like, say, Hugh Hefner on two NBC sitcoms, or Mike Wallace and Orrin Hatch on one CBS sitcom.* "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" (8-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Hilary (Karyn Parsons) takes Will (Will Smith) to a party -- at the Playboy Mansion, where Hugh Hefner is in attendance. NBC.* "I'll Fly Away" (8-9 p.m., WETA, Channel 26) -- The primary characters on this fine series adjust their allegiances a bit tonight, as Forrest (Sam Waterston)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 18, 1993
There's no baseball tonight. For those looking elsewhere for entertainment, the place to turn is PBS, which cements its claim to the "quality" TV audience as it begins to roll out weekly episodes of "I'll Fly Away."* "I'll Fly Away" (8-9:45 p.m., WMPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Last week PBS showed its brand-new made-for-TV movie of "I'll Fly Away." Tonight it shows another episode -- this one the original series pilot, which explains how Lilly Harper (Regina Taylor) came to work for Forrest Bedford (Sam Waterston)
FEATURES
By Susan Stewart and Susan Stewart,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 25, 1992
Can TV be too good for its own good? If most of prime-time TV -- laugh tracks, moving moments, lessons learned -- is life made simple, then NBC's "I'll Fly Away" is TV made difficult. Is it too difficult? Or have we all watched so much "good TV" that we can't recognize something great when it comes along?"Away," which returns Friday (9 p.m. on Channel 2) for nine weeks of new episodes, is not always easy to take. It offers few answers. It creeps along toward uncertain conclusions, its 1950s Southern setting unenhanced by stock characters or fake antebellum atmosphere.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
John Wesley Jackson, a retired Western Electric Co. employee who later worked as a courier and cabdriver, died of cancer Saturday at Mercy Medical Center. He was 71 and a resident of the city's Pen Lucy neighborhood. Born in Baltimore and raised on Mace Street, he was a 1952 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and later studied education at what is now Morgan State University. He served in the Air Force from 1952 to 1956, attaining the rank of sergeant. He then worked for Western Electric at Point Breeze for 27 years before his retirement in 1983.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | February 28, 1992
You might think you missed "I'll Fly Away" since NBC pulled it from the schedule in December, but you won't know how much you missed it until you see tonight's episode at 9 on Channel 2.The dramatic series about a southern attorney and his family at the dawn of the civil rights era returns to NBC's schedule tonight with the network's promise it will stay on for the rest of the season. Tonight's show is one of the finest hours of episodic drama you'll see this year.Part of the show is a coming-of-age story involving Francie (Ashlee Levitch)
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