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Regime Change

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NEWS
August 25, 2003
IT'S A NIGHTMARE of a regime, led by a brutal dictator who can't be trusted. It's heavily armed -- if not already with nuclear weapons, then all too soon. It threatens its neighboring states and, less directly, the United States. The long-term U.S. goal has to be regime change. We're talking Pyongyang and Kim Jong Il, not Baghdad and Saddam Hussein. There are lots of critical differences between these two crises, but there's much in common -- starting with the vexing problem of how to topple an antagonist.
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NEWS
July 19, 2012
Today's decision by Russia and China to veto a United Nations Security Council resolution to impose sanctions on the brutal regime in Syria is, at most, a hollow victory for President Bashar Assad. Russian officials say they opposed the measure for fear that it would lead to regime change, possibly with the assistance of western military forces, as in Libya. But given the events on the ground this week in Syria, the veto appears likely only to ensure that regime change comes through blood and chaos, not diplomacy.
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NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | May 11, 2011
As the wave of revolution continues to sweep through the Arab world, the Syrian regime of Bashar Assad could be its next victim. While many in the United States and Israel appear hesitant to support Syria's anti-regime forces - basing their thinking on the old maxim that the devil you know is better than the one you don't - this viewpoint overlooks the major benefits both for the United States and for Israel if the Assad regime is ousted....
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | July 12, 2012
Testifying before a Senate committee a few months ago, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton lamented that America was "in an information war, and we are losing that war. " This week, she blew a fuse at the "Friends of Syria" meeting in Paris, saying that Russia and Chinashould "pay a price" for not supporting regime change in Syria. Here's a thought: How about using the power of truth to get things done rather than cover and manipulation? Russia and China aren't following America's script for one reason: They have major economic interests in Syria and rightfully see any attempt at regime change as America trying to steal their lunch.
NEWS
By Reza Aslan and Reza Aslan,Los Angeles Times | June 15, 2007
Finally, after three decades of mutual animosity, outright threats and puerile name-calling, the United States and Iran late last month engaged in a constructive dialogue about their common concerns in the Middle East. Already the optimism that followed those talks has given way to the usual tit-for-tat accusations. Still, one can't help but wonder: After all these years, could the U.S. and Iran slowly be moving toward a more diplomatic relationship or even - dare I say it - rapprochement?
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | June 2, 2006
TEHRAN, IRAN -- Outside the leafy, fenced campus of Tehran University, students look warily at police cars patrolling nearby but are ready to talk about recent demonstrations. The disruptions were started by Azeri students, members of an ethnic minority that was infuriated by a cartoon in a government newspaper depicting a cockroach speaking their language. But the protest spread to youths angered by the hard-line government of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, which has expelled campus activists and pushed out reformist lecturers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts, a Democratic presidential candidate, suggested in a speech Wednesday that "we need a regime change in the United States" as well as in Iraq, drawing angry responses from Republican leaders who accused him of ill-timed and inappropriate remarks. Kerry told an audience in Peterborough, N.H., that President Bush had lost the trust of many international leaders with his handling of the Iraq conflict and that those relations could not be restored while Bush remained in office, according to a report in The Boston Globe yesterday.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Decades of autocratic rule by Middle East leaders have failed the Arab world, bringing poverty and hopelessness to one of the world's most volatile regions, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said yesterday. In a shift that could reshape this country's relations with some of its closest Arab partners, Powell specifically rejected the long-term U.S. policy of ignoring political repression in oil-rich Persian Gulf states in exchange for reliable supplies of cheap crude oil. "I no longer think that is affordable and sustainable," Powell said in a major speech he said was meant to lay out a new U.S. orientation to promote democratic and economic reform across the region.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush's spokesman bluntly suggested yesterday that the people of Iraq rise up and remove Saddam Hussein from power, even if it means killing him. "The cost of one bullet," said White House press secretary Ari Fleischer, would spare the United States the billions of dollars it would cost to wage war against Iraq. Fleischer also suggested that a forced exile of Hussein would be far cheaper than war. Bush has long supported "regime change" in Iraq. But Fleischer's comments were the bluntest call yet for Iraqi citizens to forcibly remove their leader.
NEWS
By Scott Ritter | February 22, 2005
NORTH KOREA'S dramatic public revelation that it possesses nuclear weapons represents a stark challenge for the Bush administration. The North Korean claim, if true, underscores the failure of President Bush's nonproliferation policies that since the beginning of his first term had been subordinated to a grander vision of regime change. That policy was intended to transform strategically vital regions of the world into Western-style democracies supportive of the United States and the Bush administration's vision of American global dominance.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | June 7, 2012
What happens when a brutal regime gets replaced by an alternative and largely unknown entity? Exhibit A: Libya. Shortly after Moammar Gadhafi bumped his head on a bullet, the "rebels" took over and promptly declared Sharia law. It's a start -- I guess. Though a start of what, no one's really quite sure. This week, a new set of Libyan "rebels" has emerged to replace the old ones, seizing control of Tripoli airport and diverting flights. It's just like the game Whac-a-Mole: Knock one down, and five more pop up. They may sort themselves out and gradually get the hang of democracy, or they may just remain a set of tribal factions fighting for supremacy from now until eternity.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 2, 2012
Gino Gradkowski grew up following his hometown Pittsburgh Steelers, but after the rival Ravens took him early in the fourth round of the 2012 NFL draft, the Delaware interior lineman couldn't have sounded more pumped about joining the Ravens in a Saturday conference call with Baltimore media. An example: “I'm elated right now because Baltimore plays football the way it's meant to be played.” And another: “I was hoping that Baltimore would be one of the places that I would end up.” And one more for the road: “I'm really excited to meet [veteran center Matt Birk]
NEWS
December 30, 2011
There is no dispute that Iraq used chemical weapons against its own people in the 1980s and in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War, when Saddam Hussein was most threatened with regime change. But has letter writer Michael DeCicco, who accused The Sun of hiding this fact, forgotten that some of those weapons were bought from the U.S. ("Iraq's chemical weapons stocks were well documented," Dec. 28)? None other than Donald Rumsfeld flew to Iraq to seal that deal in 1985. Your critic contends The Sun was "pants on fire" when it claimed Iraq did not have weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | June 9, 2011
I was watching Charlie Rose the other night. He was talking via satellite with veteran war reporter John Burns of The New York Times, who was standing atop a five-star hotel in Tripoli. They were talking about NATO's stepped-up bombing campaign designed to kill Moammar Ghadafi, the Mad Hatter longtime ruler of Libya. War planes are bombing the heck out of targets in the Libyan capital in the hope that they can either kill the crazed colonel or somehow force a regime change. Maybe his inner circle will turn on him. Maybe he'll cut and run - or maybe not. He says he'd rather be a martyr to the European crusaders than to flee.
NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | May 11, 2011
As the wave of revolution continues to sweep through the Arab world, the Syrian regime of Bashar Assad could be its next victim. While many in the United States and Israel appear hesitant to support Syria's anti-regime forces - basing their thinking on the old maxim that the devil you know is better than the one you don't - this viewpoint overlooks the major benefits both for the United States and for Israel if the Assad regime is ousted....
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 25, 2011
How are Americans to reconcile the Barack Obama who says Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi must go with the one who drags his heels on providing the military means to achieve his departure? The president's schizophrenia on the Libya crisis has been revealed again by his decision, under pressure from his British and French allies, to start deploying unmanned drone aircraft in the North African civil war, under the guise of merely providing additional civilian protection. The decision may technically adhere to President Obama's pledge that he will put no "boots on the ground" in Libya, meaning no uniformed American combat troops fighting side by side with the rebels.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Now that John M. Poindexter, he of the screwy scheme for selling "war futures," has been bounced from the State Department and the idea with him, an even more bizarre notion has surfaced from the academic sector. Michael McFaul, a Stanford political science professor and Hoover Insitution research fellow, has recently written that to cope with the fiasco following the ouster of Saddam Hussein and President Bush's efforts to bring democracy to the Middle East, yet another Cabinet department is needed.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | September 6, 2008
No wonder both presidential candidates are promising change. Even the stupid don't need to be reminded that, yet again, it really is the economy that will dominate voters' concerns. Especially the last couple of days. After a fortnight of diverting political froth in Denver and St. Paul, the economy has yanked our attention back to the world as it is. There are bright spots, and I'll get to those below. But many (including Wall Street economists, who are unlikely to be Democratic shills seeking regime change)
NEWS
By Reza Aslan and Reza Aslan,Los Angeles Times | June 15, 2007
Finally, after three decades of mutual animosity, outright threats and puerile name-calling, the United States and Iran late last month engaged in a constructive dialogue about their common concerns in the Middle East. Already the optimism that followed those talks has given way to the usual tit-for-tat accusations. Still, one can't help but wonder: After all these years, could the U.S. and Iran slowly be moving toward a more diplomatic relationship or even - dare I say it - rapprochement?
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