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By Bruce Britt and Bruce Britt,Contributing Writer | July 10, 1993
In its infancy the Caribbean pop sound known as reggae was the soundtrack of revolution. Inspired by God and the violent political realities of Jamaica circa 1975, reggae pioneers like Bob Marley, Burning Spear and Peter Tosh set prophetic, apocalyptic lyrics against a tropical beat.Twenty-odd years later reggae is still causing a revolution, but this time it's at the cash register. Reggae's international popularity is booming, as evidenced by Billboard magazine's introduction today of a chart to monitor sales of the music.
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NEWS
June 21, 2013
Sunday, June 23 Juneteenth The Howard County Center of African American Culture Inc. presents "From Slavery to Freedom: The Trials and Tribulations of James Too" at 3 p.m. at the Bain Center, 5470 Ruth Keeton Way in Columbia. Free event include dance performances, singing, light refreshments and audience participation. Information: 410-715-1921. Tuesday, June 25 'Power Foods for the Brain' A lecture with Dr. Neal Barnard will be held at 7 p.m. at Howard County Library's Miller branch, 9421 Frederick Road in Ellicott City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2003
July 4 Here's where reggae is rockin' Local legend Danny Dread will perform an Independence Day set tomorrow at the Belvedere Hotel's 13th Floor. The music is scheduled to start around 9:30 p.m. The Belvedere Hotel is at 1 E. Chase St. For more information, call 410-347-0888. July 5 Fertile Ground will warm up the crowd for the Midnite Band at the Black Cat in Washington. Tickets are $15. The Black Cat is at 1811 14th St. N.W., Washington. For more information, call 202-667-7960 or visit www.blackcatdc.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
The melody is instantly familiar but the other sounds are not - horns boldly announce their arrival, the patient tempo crawls along and the voice is more Maryland than Liverpool. When the plea to stay kicks in - "Believe me when I beg you, don't ever leave me alone," he sings - the song's identity becomes clear. It's "Oh! Darling," the Lennon/McCartney classic, but this bouncing version comes courtesy of Yellow Dubmarine, a Rockville eight-piece that plays reggae versions of Beatles songs.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | May 12, 1993
They raced nine days earlier in a $30,600 allowance race and Argentine-bred Reggae defeated the fast-closing Rebuff by half a length for the victory.Yesterday's $35,000 Bald Eagle Stakes at Pimlico Race Cours was practically a rerun of that meeting.Reggae, with Mario Pino aboard, took the lead in mid-stretch an held off Rebuff by a neck to record his second straight turf victory over a 1 3/8 -mile distance.The early pacesetter, Master Dreamer, finished third behin Rebuff, who was second for the fifth straight time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 8, 1994
Most performers wouldn't consider a coast-to-coast package tour an ideal way to relax, but for Maxi Priest, playing the 10th Anniversary Reggae Sunsplash Festival is virtually a summer vacation."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 28, 2002
Stepping Razor: Red X, the Canadian Academy Award-nominated documentary from 1992 that combines a portrait of reggae great Peter Tosh with an investigation into his September 1987 murder, receives a rare screening tomorrow at 8 p.m. at the Heritage Cinema House, 19 E. North Ave. (between Charles and St. Paul streets), followed by a reggae dance party with Junior Marvin (former lead guitarist with Bob Marley and the Wailers) and Strykers Posse at 10 p.m. Americans have used reggae as good-time music for so long that it's useful to remember its pungent youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
The melody is instantly familiar but the other sounds are not - horns boldly announce their arrival, the patient tempo crawls along and the voice is more Maryland than Liverpool. When the plea to stay kicks in - "Believe me when I beg you, don't ever leave me alone," he sings - the song's identity becomes clear. It's "Oh! Darling," the Lennon/McCartney classic, but this bouncing version comes courtesy of Yellow Dubmarine, a Rockville eight-piece that plays reggae versions of Beatles songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 1, 2005
The Jamaica he takes us through isn't the one seen in travel brochures and TV commercials - a golden paradise of smiling natives, fun beaches and crystal-blue water. In the lilting, hip-hop-suffused title track of Welcome to Jamrock, the latest album by Damian "Jr. Gong" Marley, the reggae star exposes the raggedy edges and warped mentality of ghetto life on the island. A ghetto education's basic / And most of the youths dem waste it / And when dem waste it, that's when dem tek the guns replace it A radio and club smash this summer, "Welcome to Jamrock" is perhaps one of the more gripping songs to come out of the genre in years.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | September 18, 2009
TREVOR RHONE, 69 Caribbean playwright, screenwriter Trevor Rhone, a leading Caribbean playwright and screenwriter who co-wrote the 1972 film "The Harder They Come," which helped introduce reggae music and urban Jamaican culture to international audiences, died Tuesday in a hospital in Kingston, Jamaica, after suffering a heart attack. "The Harder They Come" starred reggae performer Jimmy Cliff as an aspiring singer who becomes a hero to the poor after killing a police officer. The film, co-written with director Perry Henzell, was drawn from the story of a Jamaican criminal killed by police in 1948.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | sam.sessa@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 26, 2009
Keeping a band together for more than a decade is no easy feat - especially if the band is full time. But for the past 15 years, the members of Baltimore reggae group Jah Works have made a living by grinding out gigs around the region and recording with other local groups. They have released 10 albums, which have sold close to 100,000 copies altogether, and performed more than 2,500 shows. Tomorrow, they'll play Rams Head Live. Along the way, they have become fixtures in the area.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | September 18, 2009
TREVOR RHONE, 69 Caribbean playwright, screenwriter Trevor Rhone, a leading Caribbean playwright and screenwriter who co-wrote the 1972 film "The Harder They Come," which helped introduce reggae music and urban Jamaican culture to international audiences, died Tuesday in a hospital in Kingston, Jamaica, after suffering a heart attack. "The Harder They Come" starred reggae performer Jimmy Cliff as an aspiring singer who becomes a hero to the poor after killing a police officer. The film, co-written with director Perry Henzell, was drawn from the story of a Jamaican criminal killed by police in 1948.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | August 18, 2008
BEIJING - The Olympic sprints are officially Jamaica's world, and we're all just spectators at a rollicking party. Shelly-Ann Fraser, Sherone Simpson and Kerron Stewart ran off with an unprecedented sweep of the women's 100-meter dash yesterday, an exhilarating victory that withstood American officials' protest that the field should have been called back after Torri Edwards' admitted false start. It was the first time since 1976 that no American woman finished in the top three in the 100 at a fully attended Olympics.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2008
UP WHERE YOU BELONG With four decades of music-making under its belt, the Steve Miller Band is at it again this summer. A jam band at heart (it was formed in the '60s after all), the group's music touches on notes of everything, from blues to classic rock. During this summer's 37-city tour, the band is getting by with a little help from its friend, Joe Cocker, whose soulful voice was also first heard in the free love era. These two '60s legends will join forces tonight at Merriweather Post Pavilion.
NEWS
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 4, 2007
For a decade, Fertile Ground, the self-contained, Baltimore-based soul-fusion band, has been an illuminating presence on the underground indie scene. With a stirring musical approach that braids elements of Afro-Cuban jazz, alt-rock, reggae and '70s soul, the seven-piece outfit regularly tours the country, Japan and Europe. Lead singer Navasha Daya dazzles with her full-throttle vocals, modern dance moves and ceremonial-style costumes accented with feathers. Fertile Ground is rooted in Daya's husband, James Collins, the band's visionary, keyboardist and chief songwriter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | December 7, 2006
It's hard for the average rock band to earn a living if it doesn't break big. All the album and ticket sales have to be split four or five ways. With that in mind, consider how tough it is for eight-piece ska/soul group the Pietasters to make enough money just to cover their costs. There are 10 people on the road if you count the tour manager and merchandise guy. "Anything divided by 10 is nothing," vocalist Stephen Jackson said. "I think one of the reasons we have survived as long as we have is that there are 10 of us and there is strength in numbers."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2008
UP WHERE YOU BELONG With four decades of music-making under its belt, the Steve Miller Band is at it again this summer. A jam band at heart (it was formed in the '60s after all), the group's music touches on notes of everything, from blues to classic rock. During this summer's 37-city tour, the band is getting by with a little help from its friend, Joe Cocker, whose soulful voice was also first heard in the free love era. These two '60s legends will join forces tonight at Merriweather Post Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart | April 21, 2005
Bob Marley's sons come to the Funk Box Damian "Jr. Gong" Marley, son of reggae icon Bob Marley, brings his Grammy Award-winning sound to the Funk Box tomorrow as part of a national tour to support his new hit single "Welcome to Jamrock." Stephen Marley, Damian's brother, will also make an appearance at the show, where they will celebrate their Jamaican roots. Jah Works, a local reggae band infused with elements of hip-hop, R&B and rock, will open for the Marley brothers. Doors open at 8 p.m., and the show begins at 9 p.m. tomorrow at the Funk Box, 10 E. Cross St. Tickets are $20. Call 410-625-2000 or visit www.the funkbox.
NEWS
August 21, 2006
Joseph Hill, 57, lead vocalist and songwriter for the traditional roots reggae group Culture, died Saturday after falling ill in Berlin while the group was in the middle of a European tour. One of reggae's most enduring bands, Culture was led by Mr. Hill for three decades. He penned the group's best known songs, including "Two Sevens Clash," "Natty Never Get Weary" and "I'm Not Ashamed." Born in the rural Jamaican parish of St. Catherine, he began his musical career in the late 1960s as a percussionist.
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