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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A California agency that oversees $3 billion in stem cell research funding Wednesday named former Osiris Therapeutics head C. Randal Mills to replace its outgoing CEO. Mills, a Bethesda native and Baltimore resident, stepped down in December after almost 10 years at Osiris, citing personal reasons. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine's governing board selected Mills from seven finalists after interviews in April, spokesman Kevin McCormack said. He will make $550,000 in his new position and a start date has not been determined, McCormack said.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A California agency that oversees $3 billion in stem cell research funding Wednesday named former Osiris Therapeutics head C. Randal Mills to replace its outgoing CEO. Mills, a Bethesda native and Baltimore resident, stepped down in December after almost 10 years at Osiris, citing personal reasons. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine's governing board selected Mills from seven finalists after interviews in April, spokesman Kevin McCormack said. He will make $550,000 in his new position and a start date has not been determined, McCormack said.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
The University of Maryland, Baltimore on Thursday announced a public-private partnership with two companies to offer stem cells for research and clinical testing. The university's Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine will work with Paragon Bioservices Inc., based in the university's BioPark, to offer stem cell services, such as the production and storage of various types of stem cells. The second company, California-based Life Technologies Inc., will provide training for research scientists who perform work for the partnership.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
The University of Maryland, Baltimore on Thursday announced a public-private partnership with two companies to offer stem cells for research and clinical testing. The university's Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine will work with Paragon Bioservices Inc., based in the university's BioPark, to offer stem cell services, such as the production and storage of various types of stem cells. The second company, California-based Life Technologies Inc., will provide training for research scientists who perform work for the partnership.
NEWS
By Curt I. Civin and E. Albert Reece | February 20, 2009
In the near future, President Barack Obama is widely expected to lift the ban on federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research, which has been in place since 2001 and has limited federal funding to only 21 existing lines. Lifting the ban is an important first step - but it is mostly symbolic. Unless it leads to a significant increase in funding for rebuilding the infrastructure this field needs to mature, it is likely to have little tangible effect. This would be very unfortunate, because the field of regenerative medicine - which utilizes stem cells, among other tools, to understand disease processes and to repair damaged organs - is ripe for development.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
With the financial backing of the Vatican, University of Maryland researchers will lead an international group of scientists to study adult stem cells from the intestines with the hope of discovering treatments for diseases while bypassing the ethical debates that have embroiled such research for a decade. The partnership, known as the International Intestinal Stem Cell Consortium, brings together researchers from the Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the University of Maryland; the University of Salerno, Bambino Gesu — an Italian children's hospital; and the Istituto Superiore di Sanita — the Italian equivalent of the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 22, 2009
Against the backdrop of the 2009 World Stem Cell Summit in Baltimore, Maryland authorities on Monday signed a first-ever bicoastal agreement with the state of California to enable hundreds of scientists funded by agencies in each state to pool their scientific talents and hundreds of millions of dollars in research grants. "By forging collaborations with California, we can create together intellectual powerhouse teams to accelerate the search for cures and ... therapies for the benefit of people across the country and around the world," said Gov. Martin O'Malley, who witnessed the agreement signed by the Maryland Technology Development Corp.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Doctors and researchers involved in embryonic-stem-cell experiments in Maryland and nationwide fear that potentially life-saving discoveries are being jeopardized by a judge who has blocked federal funding for such research. Grants from a state fund for stem-cell research are not affected, but federal research funds that flow to institutions such as the University of Maryland and the Johns Hopkins University would be cut off. That could affect a $500,000 experiment conducted by researchers in labs at both universities.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1999
A team of scientists at a small Baltimore biotechnology company has made a breakthrough in the effort to develop revolutionary new treatments to regenerate bone, cartilage, fat and other structural and connective tissues damaged by injury or disease.The team at Osiris Therapeutics Inc. has shown for the first time that progenitor, or "master" cells, which give rise to all other cells in the body, can be prodded in the laboratory into becoming replacement bone, cartilage, fat and other cells.
NEWS
By Megan Garvey and Megan Garvey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2004
LOS ANGELES - As California moves quickly toward setting up a $3 billion embryonic stem cell research agency, other states are scrambling to prevent their top researchers from being raided. The lure is clear: $300 million a year for embryonic stem cell research in California for the next decade, more than 10 times the yearly federal funding available and free of the Bush administration's tight restrictions on what research can be conducted with federal money. Since the passage of Proposition 71 in California, which established the California Center for Regenerative Medicine, "Everyone I talk to wants to move to California," said Kevin Wilson, director of public policy for the American Society of Cell Biologists.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Doctors and researchers involved in embryonic-stem-cell experiments in Maryland and nationwide fear that potentially life-saving discoveries are being jeopardized by a judge who has blocked federal funding for such research. Grants from a state fund for stem-cell research are not affected, but federal research funds that flow to institutions such as the University of Maryland and the Johns Hopkins University would be cut off. That could affect a $500,000 experiment conducted by researchers in labs at both universities.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
With the financial backing of the Vatican, University of Maryland researchers will lead an international group of scientists to study adult stem cells from the intestines with the hope of discovering treatments for diseases while bypassing the ethical debates that have embroiled such research for a decade. The partnership, known as the International Intestinal Stem Cell Consortium, brings together researchers from the Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the University of Maryland; the University of Salerno, Bambino Gesu — an Italian children's hospital; and the Istituto Superiore di Sanita — the Italian equivalent of the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 22, 2009
Against the backdrop of the 2009 World Stem Cell Summit in Baltimore, Maryland authorities on Monday signed a first-ever bicoastal agreement with the state of California to enable hundreds of scientists funded by agencies in each state to pool their scientific talents and hundreds of millions of dollars in research grants. "By forging collaborations with California, we can create together intellectual powerhouse teams to accelerate the search for cures and ... therapies for the benefit of people across the country and around the world," said Gov. Martin O'Malley, who witnessed the agreement signed by the Maryland Technology Development Corp.
NEWS
By Curt I. Civin and E. Albert Reece | February 20, 2009
In the near future, President Barack Obama is widely expected to lift the ban on federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research, which has been in place since 2001 and has limited federal funding to only 21 existing lines. Lifting the ban is an important first step - but it is mostly symbolic. Unless it leads to a significant increase in funding for rebuilding the infrastructure this field needs to mature, it is likely to have little tangible effect. This would be very unfortunate, because the field of regenerative medicine - which utilizes stem cells, among other tools, to understand disease processes and to repair damaged organs - is ripe for development.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1999
A team of scientists at a small Baltimore biotechnology company has made a breakthrough in the effort to develop revolutionary new treatments to regenerate bone, cartilage, fat and other structural and connective tissues damaged by injury or disease.The team at Osiris Therapeutics Inc. has shown for the first time that progenitor, or "master" cells, which give rise to all other cells in the body, can be prodded in the laboratory into becoming replacement bone, cartilage, fat and other cells.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Reporter | January 14, 2007
Stem cells are a hot topic among biotech businesses and on Capital Hill ? where the new Congress is again considering a bill to lift restrictions on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. But there?s still a lot of confusion among the public about what the cells are, what they can do and from where they come. ?I don?t think most people understand the science ? there?s an awful lot we don?t understand yet,? said Dale Carlson, spokesman for the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, which was created to help administer $3 billion in stem cell funding for the state?
NEWS
March 10, 2009
President Barack Obama's decision to lift the ban on federal funding of embryonic stem cell research affords U.S. scientists a chance to expand this potentially ground-breaking, disease-curing work and make up ground lost to researchers elsewhere whose hands weren't similarly tied. A memo also signed by the president yesterday would return science to its rightful place in government policymaking - above politics. The stem cell decision has been anxiously awaited by American researchers who have been limited in their work on embryonic stem cells since 2001, when President Bush restricted the use of federal funds to research involving a relatively small number of existing embryonic stem cell lines.
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